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I'm doing a recursive copy of files and like xcopy /D I only want to copy newer files destination files (I cannot use xcopy directly since I need to alter some files in the copy process).

In java I use lastModified() to check if the destination file is older than the source file and it's very slow.

  • Can I speed up the process (maybe using JNI??)?
  • Are there any other copy scripts that can do the job better (copy new files + regexp change some text files)?

Copying files anyways is not an option since that will take more time than checking last modified date (copying over the network).

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4 Answers 4

up vote 3 down vote accepted

You need to determine why it is so slow.

When you are running the progrma what is the CPU utilisation of your process. If it more than 50% user, then you should be able to optmise your program, if its less than 20% there isn't so much you can do.

Usually this method is slow because the file you are examining is on disk rather than in memory. If this is the case you need to speed up how you access your disk, or get a faster drive. e.g. SSD can be 10-100x faster at doing this.

A bulk query might help. You can do this by using multiple threads to check the lastModified date. e.g. have a fixed size thread pool and add a task for each file. The size of the thread pool determines the number of files polled at once.

This allows the OS to re-order the requests to suit the layout on the disk. Note: This is fine in theory, but you have to test whether this makes things faster on your OS/hardware as its just as likely to make things slower. ;)

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I used the thread pool method. Much faster! –  dacwe Dec 7 '10 at 9:09
    
When this approach works well the OS can re-order the requests to minimise the head movement. A common algo used is the en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Elevator_algorithm . BTW, Its not possible for a Java program to know what would be the best order to access the file in. –  Peter Lawrey Dec 7 '10 at 11:35

Did you check you check this method?

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I just update the link. –  Özhan Düz Nov 29 '10 at 16:07
    
It's getting lastModified() that is slow and that see that FileUtils does that for me (copying files that has the same last modified date is not an option - that's even slower). –  dacwe Nov 29 '10 at 16:13

Unfortunately the way Java handles looking up lastModified is slow (basically it queries the underlying file system for each file as you request the information, there is no bulk loading of this data on listFiles or similar).

You could potentially invoke a more efficient native program to do this in bulk, but any such solution would be closely tied to the platform you deploy to.

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I imagine you are doing this over the network, otherwise there would be little point in the copy. Network directory operations are slow, bad luck. You could always just copy the file below a certain size threshold, whatever makes the total operation take least time.

I disagree with Kris here: there's nothing startlingly inefficient in the way Java does it, and in any case it really has to do it that way because you want the latest value.

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Yes, you were right, network... But Peter Lawrey seem to be right! –  dacwe Nov 30 '10 at 22:24

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