Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

can somebody explain why is the following trivial code (implementation of Euclid's algorithm to find greatest common denominator) about 3 times slower then equivalent code in Ruby ?

contents of iter_gcd.py:

from sys import argv,stderr

def gcd(m, n):
    if n > m:
        m, n = n, m
    while n != 0:
        rem = m % n
        m = n
        n = rem
    return m

# in Python3 code there is xrange replaced with range function
def main(a1, a2):
    comp = 0
    for j in xrange(a1, 1, -1):
        for i in xrange(1, a2):
            comp += gcd(i,j)

    print(comp)

if __name__ == '__main__':
    if len(argv) != 3:
        stderr.write('usage: {0:s} num1 num2\n'.format(argv[0]))
        exit(1)
    else:
        main(int(argv[1]), int(argv[2]))

contents of iter_gcd.rb:

def gcd(m, n)
    while n != 0
        rem = m % n
        m = n
        n = rem
    end
    return m
end

def main(a1, a2)
    comp = 0
    a1.downto 2 do
        |j|
        1.upto (a2 - 1) do
            |i|
            comp += gcd(i,j)
        end
    end
    puts comp
end

 if __FILE__ == $0
    if ARGV.length != 2
        $stderr.puts('usage: %s num1 num2' % $0)
        exit(1)
    else
        main(ARGV[0].to_i, ARGV[1].to_i)
    end
end

Execution times measurements:

$ time python iter_gcd.py 4000 3000
61356305

real    0m22.890s
user    0m22.867s
sys     0m0.006s

$ python -V
Python 2.6.4


$ time python3 iter_gcd.py 4000 3000
61356305

real    0m18.634s
user    0m18.615s
sys     0m0.009s

$ python3 -V
Python 3.1.2


$ time ruby iter_gcd.rb 4000 3000
61356305

real    0m7.619s
user    0m7.616s
sys     0m0.003s

$ ruby -v
ruby 1.9.2p0 (2010-08-18 revision 29036) [x86_64-linux]

Just curious why I got such results. I considered CPython to be faster in most cases then MRI and even the new Ruby 1.9 on YARV but this "microbenchmark" did really surprised me.

Btw, I know I can use specialised library function like fractions.gcd but I'd like to compare implementations of such basic and trivial language constructs.

Did I miss something or is the implementation of the next Ruby generation so much improved in area of sheer speed ?

share|improve this question
    
Pls correctly format/highlight your code samples. –  helpermethod Nov 29 '10 at 16:03
2  
2  
For whatever it's worth, using your code above, python (2.6) is considerably faster than ruby (1.8) on my machine... 11.7 seconds for python vs. 46.7 seconds for ruby. Of course, I'm comparing to ruby 1.8 instead of 1.9, which wasn't quite your question... –  Joe Kington Nov 29 '10 at 16:25
2  
The Python gcd swaps m and n if n>m. The Ruby gcd doesn't. This probably doesn't account for all the difference, but it would be better to compare apples with apples. –  unutbu Nov 29 '10 at 17:47
2  
@EOL: Ruby does appear to handle bignums transparently. –  Russell Borogove Nov 29 '10 at 19:36
show 8 more comments

4 Answers

up vote 33 down vote accepted
+50

Summary

"Because the function call overhead in Python is much larger than in Ruby."

Details

Being a microbenchmark, this really doesn't say much about the performance of either language in proper use. Likely you would want to rewrite the program to take advantage of the strenghts of Python and Ruby, but this does illustrate one of the weak points of Python at the moment. The root cause of the speed differences come from function call overhead. I made a few tests to illustrate. See below for code and more details. For the Python tests, I used 2000 for both gcd parameters.

Interpreter: Python 2.6.6
Program type: gcd using function call
Total CPU time: 29.336 seconds

Interpreter: Python 2.6.6
Program type: gcd using inline code
Total CPU time: 13.194 seconds

Interpreter: Python 2.6.6
Program type: gcd using inline code, with dummy function call
Total CPU  time: 30.672 seconds

This tells us that it's not the calculation made by the gcd function that contributes most to the time difference, it's the function call itself. With Python 3.1, the difference is similar:

Interpreter: Python 3.1.3rc1
Program type: gcd using function call
Total CPU time: 30.920 seconds

Interpreter: Python 3.1.3rc1
Program type: gcd using inline code
Total CPU time: 15.185 seconds

Interpreter: Python 3.1.3rc1
Program type: gcd using inline code, with dummy function call
Total CPU time: 33.739 seconds

Again, the actual calculation is not biggest contributor, it's the function call itself. In Ruby, the function call overhead is much smaller. (Note: I had to use smaller parameters (200) for the Ruby version of the programs because the Ruby profiler really slows down real-time performance. That doesn't affect CPU time performance, though.)

Interpreter: ruby 1.9.2p0 (2010-08-18 revision 29036) [i486-linux]
Program type: gcd using function call
Total CPU time: 21.66 seconds

Interpreter: ruby 1.9.2p0 (2010-08-18 revision 29036) [i486-linux]
Program type: gcd using inline code
Total CPU time: 21.31 seconds

Interpreter: ruby 1.8.7 (2010-08-16 patchlevel 302) [i486-linux]
Program type: gcd using function call
Total CPU time: 27.00 seconds

Interpreter: ruby 1.8.7 (2010-08-16 patchlevel 302) [i486-linux]
Program type: gcd using inline code
Total CPU time: 24.83 seconds

Notice how neither Ruby 1.8 nor 1.9 suffer greatly from the gcd function call – the function call vs. inline version are more or less equal. Ruby 1.9 seems to be a little better with less difference between the function call and inline versions.

So the answer to the question is: "because the function call overhead in Python is much larger than in Ruby".

Code

# iter_gcd -- Python 2.x version, with gcd function call
#             Python 3.x version uses range instead of xrange
from sys import argv,stderr

def gcd(m, n):
    if n > m:
        m, n = n, m
    while n != 0:
        rem = m % n
        m = n
        n = rem
    return m

def main(a1, a2):
    comp = 0
    for j in xrange(a1, 1, -1):
        for i in xrange(1, a2):
            comp += gcd(i,j)
    print(comp)

if __name__ == '__main__':
    if len(argv) != 3:
        stderr.write('usage: {0:s} num1 num2\n'.format(argv[0]))
        exit(1)
    else:
        main(int(argv[1]), int(argv[2]))

# iter_gcd -- Python 2.x version, inline calculation
#             Python 3.x version uses range instead of xrange
from sys import argv,stderr

def main(a1, a2):
    comp = 0
    for j in xrange(a1, 1, -1):
        for i in xrange(1, a2):
            if i < j:
                m, n = j, i
            else:
                m, n = i, j
            while n != 0:
                rem = m % n
                m = n
                n = rem
            comp += m
    print(comp)

if __name__ == '__main__':
    if len(argv) != 3:
        stderr.write('usage: {0:s} num1 num2\n'.format(argv[0]))
        exit(1)
    else:
        main(int(argv[1]), int(argv[2]))

# iter_gcd -- Python 2.x version, inline calculation, dummy function call
#             Python 3.x version uses range instead of xrange
from sys import argv,stderr

def dummyfunc(n, m):
    a = n + m

def main(a1, a2):
    comp = 0
    for j in xrange(a1, 1, -1):
        for i in xrange(1, a2):
            if i < j:
                m, n = j, i
            else:
                m, n = i, j
            while n != 0:
                rem = m % n
                m = n
                n = rem
            comp += m
            dummyfunc(i, j)
    print(comp)

if __name__ == '__main__':
    if len(argv) != 3:
        stderr.write('usage: {0:s} num1 num2\n'.format(argv[0]))
        exit(1)
    else:
        main(int(argv[1]), int(argv[2]))

# iter_gcd -- Ruby version, with gcd function call

def gcd(m, n)
    if n > m
        m, n = n, m
    end
    while n != 0
        rem = m % n
        m = n
        n = rem
    end
    return m
end

def main(a1, a2)
    comp = 0
    a1.downto 2 do
        |j|
        1.upto a2-1 do
            |i|
            comp += gcd(i,j)
        end
    end
    puts comp
end

 if __FILE__ == $0
    if ARGV.length != 2
        $stderr.puts('usage: %s num1 num2' % $0)
        exit(1)
    else
        main(ARGV[0].to_i, ARGV[1].to_i)
    end
end

# iter_gcd -- Ruby version, with inline gcd

def main(a1, a2)
    comp = 0
    a1.downto 2 do |j|
        1.upto a2-1 do |i|
            m, n = i, j
            if n > m
                m, n = n, m
            end
            while n != 0
                rem = m % n
                m = n
                n = rem
            end
            comp += m
        end
    end
    puts comp
end

 if __FILE__ == $0
    if ARGV.length != 2
        $stderr.puts('usage: %s num1 num2' % $0)
        exit(1)
    else
        main(ARGV[0].to_i, ARGV[1].to_i)
    end
end

Test runs

Finally, the commands used to run Python and Ruby with profiling to get the numbers for comparison were pythonX.X -m cProfile iter_gcdX.py 2000 2000 for Python and rubyX.X -rprofile iter_gcdX.rb 200 200 for Ruby. The reason for the difference is that the Ruby profiler adds a lot of overhead. The results are still valid because I'm comparing the difference between a function call and inline code, not the difference between Python and Ruby as such.

See also

Why is python slower compared to Ruby even with this very simple “test”?

Is there something wrong with this python code, why does it run so slow compared to ruby?

The Computer Language Benchmarks Game

Google Search: ruby python function call faster

share|improve this answer
    
+1 for "this really doesn't say much about the performance" –  Aaron Digulla Dec 8 '10 at 17:01
    
The function call overhead do not dominates the execution time on my machine gist.github.com/733555 –  J.F. Sebastian Dec 8 '10 at 17:07
1  
@J.F. Sebastian: I consistently get slightly better performance from the inline version. The mean over 20 runs differs by around .4 in favour of the inline version. But this just shows the problems of this kind of question: our Python versions could be different, run on different architectures, yours could be compiled with a different compiler, etc. I tried on another machine and results were in the same direction but the difference was larger. The fact remains that Python has quite a large function call overhead and that this question is impossible to answer without defining it more exactly. –  Fabian Fagerholm Dec 8 '10 at 21:44
    
@Fabian Fagerholm: I've added variant that only calls dummyfunc(). It takes 0.8 seconds vs. 4.5 for the inline variant gist.github.com/733555 It says that the calculation time is much larger than the time due to the call overhead in this case. What is the ratio iter_gcd_dummy.py time / iter_gcd_inline.py time on your machine? –  J.F. Sebastian Dec 9 '10 at 0:40
    
@J.F. Sebastian: The ratio is 0.65 vs 3.81 on a Xeon 2.83 GHz with Python 2.6.5 and 2.98 vs 10.65 on a Pentium M 1.2 GHz with Python 2.6.6. But this is completely obvious, since iter_gcd_inline.py runs an extra loop. It apples and oranges. A more proper comparison would be to inline the dummy function (ie. move the dummyfunc() addition into the main() function) and compare the "dummy function version" vs. "dummy inline version". In this case, I get the expected difference: moving the addition inline speeds up execution by 40-60%. –  Fabian Fagerholm Dec 9 '10 at 6:16
show 1 more comment

I can confirm that ruby1.9 is faster than CPython for this "microbenchmark" on my machine:

| Interpreter                     | Time, s | Ratio |
|---------------------------------+---------+-------|
| python-2.6 (cython_gcd.gcd_int) |     2.8 |  0.33 |
| pypy-1.4                        |     3.5 |  0.41 |
| jython-2.5 (java "1.6.0_20")    |     4.7 |  0.55 |
| python-2.6 (cython_gcd.gcd)     |     5.6 |  0.65 |
| ruby-1.9                        |     8.6 |  1.00 |
| jython-2.5                      |     8.9 |  1.03 |
| python-3.2                      |    11.0 |  1.28 |
| python-2.6                      |    15.9 |  1.85 |
| ruby-1.8                        |    42.6 |  4.95 |
#+TBLFM: $3=$2/@6$2;%.2f

Profiler (python -mcProfile iter_gcd.py 4000 3000) shows that 80% of the time spent calling gcd() function, so indeed the difference is in the gcd() function.

I wrote cython_gcd extension for Python using Cython, cython_gcd.pyx:

def gcd(m, n):
    while n:
        n, m = m % n, n
    return m

def gcd_int(int m, int n):
    while n:
        n, m = m % n, n
    return m

It is used in the iter_gcd.py as follows from cython_gcd import gcd, gcd_int.

To try the extension, run: python setup.py build_ext --inplace, where setup.py:

from distutils.core import setup
from distutils.extension import Extension
from Cython.Distutils import build_ext

ext_modules = [Extension("cython_gcd", ["cython_gcd.pyx"])]

setup(
  name = 'Hello world app',
  cmdclass = {'build_ext': build_ext},
  ext_modules = ext_modules
)

To install the extension globally, run python setup.py install.

share|improve this answer
    
+1 Cool bit of cython-ery. –  hughdbrown Dec 7 '10 at 19:06
    
Nice answer, and cool example of cython. However, I think you're misinterpreting the benchmarks (or you were not exact with your words ;). Of course the program spends most of its time in the gcd() function – because it's called thousands of times even when the parameters are quite small. So the difference is not in the function, it's in the fact that the function is called. Maybe this is what you meant? –  Fabian Fagerholm Dec 7 '10 at 21:14
    
@Fabian Fagerholm: if gcd = lambda a,b:0 it takes 7% percent of the original time for the gcd() function. The fact that gcd_int() provides a much better performance could tell us by itself that the call overhead is small. –  J.F. Sebastian Dec 8 '10 at 10:45
    
@J.F. Sebastian: Using cython definitely makes the loop faster, but you also reduce the function call overhead. Your lambda example shows that the calculation contributes greatly to the time used in the Python program, but it doesn't explain the difference between Python and Ruby. –  Fabian Fagerholm Dec 8 '10 at 21:16
1  
@J.F. Sebastian: In my answer I showed that inlining the gcd calculation can make the Python version faster than the Ruby version. So something else than the calculation has to explain why Python is slower than Ruby in the gcd function case. I also showed that the difference between function gcd and inline gcd is much larger in Python than in Ruby, pointing to function call overhead in Python. But tests on different machines indicates that these findings vary considerably, so we're back to what I wrote in my answer: this doesn't say much. For an exact answer we'd need to profile much deeper. –  Fabian Fagerholm Dec 9 '10 at 6:38
show 1 more comment

I seem to remember that ruby handles integers differently than Python, so my guess would be it is simply that Python is spending a lot of time allocating memory while Ruby just mutates the integers in place.

For what it is worth, using Pypy 1.4 reduces the runtime for the Python version on my system from about 15 seconds to under 3 seconds.

share|improve this answer
    
I'd believe it has something to do with implementation of numbers storing/handling. On the other hand for above calculations sizes of integer and longint for the result are sufficient and I don't expect Python stores them ineffectively as arbitrary numbers, f.e. –  David Unric Nov 29 '10 at 16:45
    
OT: I did have a look at Pypy and it looks promising, although faster then CPython not in all cases. Can we expect where it would be "production ready" ? –  David Unric Nov 29 '10 at 16:47
    
@David Unric: It passes a wide variety of tests right now. If it's not good enough for you now, it probably will never be. –  bukzor Nov 29 '10 at 18:08
    
it's not quite there yet codespeak.net/pypy/dist/pypy/doc/cpython_differences.html –  dan_waterworth Nov 29 '10 at 19:40
2  
pypy.org/compat.html this is the newest version of pypy compatibility. Some stuff like refcounting won't change –  fijal Dec 2 '10 at 7:05
add comment

I can't replicate your result. The python code appears to be 4 times faster than the ruby code:

2010-12-07 13:49:55:~/tmp$ time python  iter_gcd.py 4000 3000
61356305

real    0m14.655s
user    0m14.633s
sys 0m0.012s

2010-12-07 13:43:26:~/tmp$ time ruby iter_gcd.rb 4000 3000
iter_gcd.rb:14: warning: don't put space before argument parentheses
61356305

real    0m54.298s
user    0m53.955s
sys 0m0.028s

Versions:

2010-12-07 13:50:12:~/tmp$ ruby --version
ruby 1.8.7 (2010-06-23 patchlevel 299) [i686-linux]
2010-12-07 13:51:52:~/tmp$ python --version
Python 2.6.6

Also, the python code can be made 8% faster:

def gcd(m, n):
    if n > m:
        m, n = n, m
    while n:
        n, m = m % n, n
    return m

def main(a1, a2):
    print sum(
        gcd(i,j)
        for j in xrange(a1, 1, -1)
        for i in xrange(1, a2)
    )

if __name__ == '__main__':
    from sys import argv
    main(int(argv[1]), int(argv[2]))

Later: when I install and use ruby 1.9.1, the ruby code is way faster:

2010-12-07 14:01:08:~/tmp$ ruby1.9.1 --version
ruby 1.9.2p0 (2010-08-18 revision 29036) [i686-linux]
2010-12-07 14:01:30:~/tmp$ time ruby1.9.1 iter_gcd.rb 4000 3000
61356305

real    0m12.137s
user    0m12.037s
sys 0m0.020s

I think your question is really, "Why is ruby 1.9.x so much faster than ruby 1.8.x?"

share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.