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Am I supposed to read each character until it reaches the \n character, join them all together and return or is there a better way? Should I use std::string or char for this?

I tried the following two examples but I need to read them as separate lines

Example 1:

std::string sockread()
{
    std::string s;
    s.resize(DEFAULT_BUFLEN);
    int result = recv(m_socket, &s[0], DEFAULT_BUFLEN, 0);

    if (result > 0) {
        return s;
    } else if (result == 0) {
        connected = false;
    } else {
        std::cout << "recv failed with error " << WSAGetLastError() << "\n";
    }
    throw std::runtime_error("Socket connection failed!");
}

Example 2:

char sockread(void)

  {
    int result;
    char buffer[DEFAULT_BUFLEN];
        result = recv(m_socket, buffer, DEFAULT_BUFLEN, 0);

        if (result > 0) {
             return *buffer;
              }
          else if (result == 0)
              {
             connected = false;
                 return *buffer;
              }
          else {
         printf("recv failed with error: %d\n", WSAGetLastError());
         return *buffer;
        }

   }
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2 Answers 2

You have a few options, depending on how the rest of your socket code is laid out.

The simpliest approach, from a coding perspective, is to just read 1 char at a time until you encounter the char you are looking for. This is not the best approach from a performance perspective, though you can use a local buffer to help you avoid fragmenting memory at least, eg:

std::string sockread(void) 
{ 
    char buffer[DEFAULT_BUFLEN]; 
    int buflen = 0;
    char c;
    std::string s;

    do
    {
        int result = recv(m_socket, &c, 1, 0); 
        if (result > 0)
        { 
            if (c == '\n')
                break;

            if (buflen == DEFAULT_BUFLEN)
            {
                s += std::string(buffer, buflen);
                buflen = 0;
            }

            buffer[buflen] = c;
            ++buflen;

            continue;
        } 

        if (result == SOCKET_ERROR) 
        {
            if (WSAGetLastError() == WSAEWOULDBLOCK)
                continue;

            std::cout << "recv failed with error " << WSAGetLastError() << "\n";
        }
        else
            connected = false; 

        throw std::runtime_error("Socket connection failed!");
    }
    while (true);

    if (buflen > 0)
        s += std::string(buffer, buflen);

    return s;
}

On the other hand, reading the raw socket data into an intermediate buffer that the rest of your reading functions access when needed allows for more efficient reading of the socket so the data is gotten out of the socket's buffers quicker (causing less blocking on the other side), eg:

std::vector<unsigned char> buffer;

std::string sockread(void) 
{ 
    unsigned char buf[DEFAULT_BUFLEN];
    int result;
    std:vector<unsigned char>::iterator it;

    do
    {
        it = std::find(buffer.begin(), buffer.end(), '\n');
        if (it != buffer.end())
            break;

        result = recv(m_socket, buf, DEFAULT_BUFLEN, 0); 
        if (result > 0)
        { 
            std::vector<unsigned char>::size_type pos = buffer.size();
            buffer.resize(pos + result);
            memcpy(&buffer[pos], buf, result);
            continue;
        } 

        if (result == SOCKET_ERROR) 
        {
            if (WSAGetLastError() == WSAEWOULDBLOCK)
                continue;

            std::cout << "recv failed with error " << WSAGetLastError() << "\n";
        }
        else
            connected = false; 

        throw std::runtime_error("Socket connection failed!");
    }
    while (true);

    std::string s((char*)&buffer[0], std::distance(buffer.begin(), it));
    buffer.erase(buffer.begin(), it);
    return s;
}
share|improve this answer
    
Using the second method, I'm getting this error - error C2664: 'recv' : cannot convert parameter 2 from 'unsigned char [512]' to 'char *' Types pointed to are unrelated; conversion requires reinterpret_cast, C-style cast or function-style cast –  thorvald Nov 29 '10 at 21:30
    
and if I change it to buf[DEFAULT_BUFLEN] (not sure if I that's bad) then it works but only the first line is returned and the rest are empty strings. –  thorvald Nov 29 '10 at 22:09
    
Like the error message says, use a type-cast: result = recv(m_socket, (char*)buf, DEFAULT_BUFLEN, 0); –  Remy Lebeau Dec 1 '10 at 21:06

Use Boost.ASIO - line-based operations covered here.

Many commonly-used internet protocols are line-based, which means that they have protocol elements that are delimited by the character sequence "\r\n". Examples include HTTP, SMTP and FTP. To more easily permit the implementation of line-based protocols, as well as other protocols that use delimiters, Boost.Asio includes the functions read_until() and async_read_until().

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the suggestion. I'll give that a try as well. –  thorvald Nov 29 '10 at 21:33
    
It's likely to be a bit more work to get to grips with the library but less work once you are up and running, since the library code is stable. –  Steve Townsend Nov 29 '10 at 23:06

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