Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free.

What is the best to use global variables outside of a callback function?

    var icon; 
    $(function(){

      $.get('data.xml', function(xml){

           icon = xml.documentElement.getElementsByTagName("icon");
           //this outputs a value
           console.log(icon);
       });
       //this is null
       //How can this maintain the value set above?
       console.log(icon);
    });
share|improve this question
1  
.... Say what? O_o –  Vilx- Nov 29 '10 at 20:33
    
What are you trying to archieve? –  thejh Nov 29 '10 at 20:34
    
how can it maintain what value? you need to be more clear. –  Ben Lee Nov 29 '10 at 20:34
    
there is no best way you just use them –  stevebot Nov 29 '10 at 20:35
    
It just needs to hold the value of the xml element. –  Mike Nov 29 '10 at 20:35

4 Answers 4

up vote 4 down vote accepted

The code you have provided is perfectly valid -- and, in fact, icon does "maintain" it's value. The problem, likely, is that get() runs asynchronously -- only calling the anonymous function after 'data.xml' has been fully loaded from the server. So the real-world sequence of execution looks something like this:

  1. call get('data.xml', function(xml){...}) (starts loading data.xml)
  2. call console.log(icon) (icon is still null at this point)
  3. (data.xml finished loading) now the anonymous function is called, which assigns the value to icon: icon = xml.documentElement.getElementsByTagName("icon").

If you want to do something with the value of icon, after the 'data.xml' has been fetched, then you'll need to do it inside the anonymous callback function. Like this:

var icon; 
$(function(){

  $.get('data.xml', function(xml){
       icon = xml.documentElement.getElementsByTagName("icon");
       console.log(icon);
   });
});

good luck!


Note: you can still use icon from code that is outside the anonymous function, but you'll need to wait to access it, until after the anonymous function has been run. The best way to do this is to put the dependent code into its own function, and then call that function from within the callback function:

var icon; 
$(function(){

  $.get('data.xml', function(xml){
       icon = xml.documentElement.getElementsByTagName("icon");
       loadIcon();
   });

   function loadIcon() {
       console.log(icon);
       // ... do whatever you need to do with icon here
   }
});
share|improve this answer
    
I was trying to avoid your second solution. But it looks like this is the only way to go. To make matters worse I had to add a setTimeout function in order to make it work. AH! –  Mike Nov 29 '10 at 20:59
1  
@Mike, if you'll post a little more about what you're doing (or maybe open another question), we can help you avoid having to use a timer. (please let us help you avoid that -- the timer is almost certainly not required here). –  Lee Nov 29 '10 at 21:03
    
here is a pastie with more details pastie.org/1333534 –  Mike Nov 29 '10 at 21:10
    
@Mike: Your issues arise from google maps not being fully initialized at the point when you call your addMarkers() function. As shown in their tutorial, google expects the Map objects to be created in the window (or body) load events -- doing otherwise, will produce "strange behavior". Your use of jQuery $(function(){...}), binds your initialization to the DOM load event, which occurs before the window/body load events. Create a new S.O. question, (post a link here so I see it), and I'll help you sort through it. –  Lee Nov 29 '10 at 21:28
    
@Mike: Check out the jQuery docs for ready(). Also check out the Events Section of the Google Maps v3 API docs -- scroll to the bottom, it shows a google-provided way to hook the window-load event, and call your initialize function: google.maps.event.addDomListener(window, 'load', initialize); This approach should co-exist acceptably with jQuery's various event hooking mechanisms. –  Lee Nov 29 '10 at 21:35

console.log(icon); won't have a value at that point as you're doing asynchronous ajax. Move your entire code that handles the response in the callback function or functions it calls.

$(function(){

  $.get('data.xml', function(xml) {
       var icon = xml.documentElement.getElementsByTagName("icon");
       console.log(icon);
   });
});
share|improve this answer
    
I need to use the variable outside of that callback function. –  Mike Nov 29 '10 at 20:37
    
@Mike: For what? –  thejh Nov 29 '10 at 20:38
1  
@Mike, you can't use it outside the callback function. You can restructure your code so that the callback function in turn calls a custom function you've written. Or you can put the custom code directly into the callback function. But there is no way to directly use it after the ajax call, because as everyone here has been saying it is asynchronous (it is possible to make the call synchronous but this is a very bad idea, because synchronous ajax can lock the browser). –  Ben Lee Nov 29 '10 at 20:47

The problem is that $.get is queuing a request, but does not execute the request synchronously; it returns immediately. JavaScript is not multi-threaded!

You will have to execute console.log(icon) inside the callback function. At the point that line is being executed, the AJAX call has not completed yet.

The global icon variable will be set from the callback; your code is correct in that regard.

share|improve this answer

It can help to visualize the code like this.

    var icon; 
    $(function(){
        $.get('data.xml', callback); // sends ajax request
        // next line happens immediately unless ajax request is set to synchronous
        console.log(icon); // logs undefined
    });
    function callback(xml){ // onsuccess callback happens
        icon = xml.documentElement.getElementsByTagName("icon");
        console.log(icon); // logs Array
    }

I removed the anonymous function and placed the callback after the console.log. Like others have pointed out the ajax callback happens asynchronously, while javascript continues to execute.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.