Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have two variables (x and y) that have a somewhat sigmoidal relationship with each other, and I need to find some sort of prediction equation that will enable me to predict the value of y, given any value of x. My prediction equation needs to show the somewhat sigmoidal relationship between the two variables. Therefore, I cannot settle for a linear regression equation that produces a line. I need to see the gradual, curvilinear change in slope that occurs at both the right and left of the graph of the two variables.

I started using numpy.polyfit after googling curvilinear regression and python, but that gave me the awful results you can see if you run the code below. Can anyone show me how to re-write the code below to get the type of sigmoidal regression equation that I want?

If you run the code below, you can see that it gives a downward facing parabola, which is not what the relationship between my variables should look like. Instead, there should be more of a sigmoidal relationship between my two variables, but with a tight fit with the data that I am using in the code below. The data in the code below are means from a large-sample research study, so they pack more statistical power than their five data points might suggest. I do not have the actual data from the large-sample research study, but I do have the means below and their standard deviations(which I am not showing). I would prefer to just plot a simple function with the mean data listed below, but the code could get more complex if complexity would offer substantial improvements.

How can I change my code to show a best fit of a sigmoidal function, preferably using scipy, numpy, and python? Here is the current version of my code, which needs to be fixed:

import numpy as np
import matplotlib.pyplot as plt

# Create numpy data arrays
x = np.array([821,576,473,377,326])
y = np.array([255,235,208,166,157])

# Use polyfit and poly1d to create the regression equation
z = np.polyfit(x, y, 3)
p = np.poly1d(z)
xp = np.linspace(100, 1600, 1500)
pxp=p(xp)

# Plot the results
plt.plot(x, y, '.', xp, pxp, '-')
plt.ylim(140,310)
plt.xlabel('x')
plt.ylabel('y')
plt.grid(True)
plt.show()

EDIT BELOW: (Re-framed the question)

Your response, and its speed, are very impressive. Thank you, unutbu. But, in order to produce more valid results, I need to re-frame my data values. This means re-casting x values as a percentage of the max x value, while re-casting y values as a percentage of the x-values in the original data. I tried to do this with your code, and came up with the following:

import numpy as np 
import matplotlib.pyplot as plt 
import scipy.optimize 

# Create numpy data arrays 
'''
# Comment out original data
#x = np.array([821,576,473,377,326]) 
#y = np.array([255,235,208,166,157]) 
'''

# Re-calculate x values as a percentage of the first (maximum)
# original x value above
x = np.array([1.000,0.702,0.576,0.459,0.397])

# Recalculate y values as a percentage of their respective x values
# from original data above
y = np.array([0.311,0.408,0.440,0.440,0.482])

def sigmoid(p,x): 
    x0,y0,c,k=p 
    y = c / (1 + np.exp(-k*(x-x0))) + y0 
    return y 

def residuals(p,x,y): 
    return y - sigmoid(p,x) 

p_guess=(600,200,100,0.01) 
(p,  
 cov,  
 infodict,  
 mesg,  
 ier)=scipy.optimize.leastsq(residuals,p_guess,args=(x,y),full_output=1,warning=True)  

'''
# comment out original xp to allow for better scaling of
# new values
#xp = np.linspace(100, 1600, 1500) 
'''

xp = np.linspace(0, 1.1, 1100) 
pxp=sigmoid(p,xp) 

x0,y0,c,k=p 
print('''\ 
x0 = {x0}
y0 = {y0}
c = {c}
k = {k}
'''.format(x0=x0,y0=y0,c=c,k=k)) 

# Plot the results 
plt.plot(x, y, '.', xp, pxp, '-') 
plt.ylim(0,1) 
plt.xlabel('x') 
plt.ylabel('y') 
plt.grid(True) 
plt.show()

Can you show me how to fix this revised code?
NOTE: By re-casting the data, I have essentially rotated the 2d (x,y) sigmoid about the z-axis by 180 degrees. Also, the 1.000 is not really a maximum of the x values. Instead, 1.000 is a mean of the range of values from different test participants in a maximum test condition.


SECOND EDIT BELOW:

Thank you, ubuntu. I carefully read through your code and looked aspects of it up in the scipy documentation. Since your name seems to pop up as a writer of the scipy documentation, I am hoping you can answer the following questions:

1.) Does leastsq() call residuals(), which then returns the difference between the input y-vector and the y-vector returned by the sigmoid() function? If so, how does it account for the difference in the lengths of the input y-vector and the y-vector returned by the sigmoid() function?

2.) It looks like I can call leastsq() for any math equation, as long as I access that math equation through a residuals function, which in turn calls the math function. Is this true?

3.) Also, I notice that p_guess has the same number of elements as p. Does this mean that the four elements of p_guess correspond in order, respectively, with the values returned by x0,y0,c, and k?

4.) Is the p that is sent as an argument to the residuals() and sigmoid() functions the same p that will be output by leastsq(), and the leastsq() function is using that p internally before returning it?

5.) Can p and p_guess have any number of elements, depending on the complexity of the equation being used as a model, as long as the number of elements in p is equal to the number of elements in p_guess?

share|improve this question
    
@MedicalMath: I am confused. As x --> 0 from the right is y supposed to go to ? And as x --> ∞ does y go to -∞? or 0? I'm not sure what function this new data is supposed to be fit to. –  unutbu Nov 30 '10 at 1:03
    
No, I still want to try logistic regression, only with the sign of the exponent of e reversed in order to rotate the graph. (Sorry, I did not figure that out until after I revised my code above.) The function would still have two horizontal asymptotes. The problem is that my code still gives a flat line for the best fit line, and I think the problem might be that I do not see how you got the values for p_guess. Can you tell me how to get the values for p_guess? Or maybe there is a deeper problem. –  MedicalMath Nov 30 '10 at 1:30
    
The new function to be fitted is: y = c / (1 + np.exp(k*(x-x0))) + y0. Note the change of sign in the exponent. –  MedicalMath Nov 30 '10 at 1:32
    
@MedicalMath: I think the problem is that after you've transformed the x and y, the data no longer looks very much like a sigmoid. With p_guess = (0.5, 0.5, 1, 0.5) I get this: imgur.com/isWB6.png. Obviously that's wrong, but I haven't been able to do better. If your data fits your model well, usually any reasonable p_guess value will do. (All roads lead to Rome.) But when the data doesn't fit the model well, then you get a strange fit (like the one above). Are you sure you want to divide the original y by x? That transforms very sigmoid-like data into very unsigmoid-like data. –  unutbu Nov 30 '10 at 4:09
    
The problem is that the domain of the sigmoidal function needs to stretch or shrink for any given test participant whose data will be plotted. So I cannot just use the equation output by your script. Instead, I would need to wrap the equation into a function that takes upper and lower bounds for domain x as parameters. Do you have any suggestion as to how I can manipulate the start, end, and width of the domain without destroying the sigmoidal relationship? –  MedicalMath Nov 30 '10 at 5:23

3 Answers 3

Using scipy.optimize.leastsq:

import numpy as np
import matplotlib.pyplot as plt
import scipy.optimize

def sigmoid(p,x):
    x0,y0,c,k=p
    y = c / (1 + np.exp(-k*(x-x0))) + y0
    return y

def residuals(p,x,y):
    return y - sigmoid(p,x)

def resize(arr,lower=0.0,upper=1.0):
    arr=arr.copy()
    if lower>upper: lower,upper=upper,lower
    arr -= arr.min()
    arr *= (upper-lower)/arr.max()
    arr += lower
    return arr

# raw data
x = np.array([821,576,473,377,326],dtype='float')
y = np.array([255,235,208,166,157],dtype='float')

x=resize(-x,lower=0.3)
y=resize(y,lower=0.3)
print(x)
print(y)
p_guess=(np.median(x),np.median(y),1.0,1.0)
p, cov, infodict, mesg, ier = scipy.optimize.leastsq(
    residuals,p_guess,args=(x,y),full_output=1,warning=True)  

x0,y0,c,k=p
print('''\
x0 = {x0}
y0 = {y0}
c = {c}
k = {k}
'''.format(x0=x0,y0=y0,c=c,k=k))

xp = np.linspace(0, 1.1, 1500)
pxp=sigmoid(p,xp)

# Plot the results
plt.plot(x, y, '.', xp, pxp, '-')
plt.xlabel('x')
plt.ylabel('y',rotation='horizontal') 
plt.grid(True)
plt.show()

yields

alt text

with sigmoid parameters

x0 = 0.826964424481
y0 = 0.151506745435
c = 0.848564826467
k = -9.54442292022

Note that for newer versions of scipy (e.g. 0.9) there is also the scipy.optimize.curve_fit function which is easier to use than leastsq. A relevant discussion of fitting sigmoids using curve_fit can be found here.

Edit: A resize function was added so that the raw data could be rescaled and shifted to fit any desired bounding box.


"your name seems to pop up as a writer of the scipy documentation"

DISCLAIMER: I am not a writer of scipy documentation. I am just a user, and a novice at that. Much of what I know about leastsq comes from reading this tutorial, written by Travis Oliphant.

1.) Does leastsq() call residuals(), which then returns the difference between the input y-vector and the y-vector returned by the sigmoid() function?

Yes! exactly.

If so, how does it account for the difference in the lengths of the input y-vector and the y-vector returned by the sigmoid() function?

The lengths are the same:

In [138]: x
Out[138]: array([821, 576, 473, 377, 326])

In [139]: y
Out[139]: array([255, 235, 208, 166, 157])

In [140]: p=(600,200,100,0.01)

In [141]: sigmoid(p,x)
Out[141]: 
array([ 290.11439268,  244.02863507,  221.92572521,  209.7088641 ,
        206.06539033])

One of the wonderful things about Numpy is that it allows you to write "vector" equations that operate on entire arrays.

y = c / (1 + np.exp(-k*(x-x0))) + y0

might look like it works on floats (indeed it would) but if you make x a numpy array, and c,k,x0,y0 floats, then the equation defines y to be a numpy array of the same shape as x. So sigmoid(p,x) returns a numpy array. There is a more complete explanation of how this works in the numpybook (required reading for serious users of numpy).

2.) It looks like I can call leastsq() for any math equation, as long as I access that math equation through a residuals function, which in turn calls the math function. Is this true?

True. leastsq attempts to minimize the sum of the squares of the residuals (differences). It searches the parameter-space (all possible values of p) looking for the p which minimizes that sum of squares. The x and y sent to residuals, are your raw data values. They are fixed. They don't change. It's the ps (the parameters in the sigmoid function) that leastsq tries to minimize.

3.) Also, I notice that p_guess has the same number of elements as p. Does this mean that the four elements of p_guess correspond in order, respectively, with the values returned by x0,y0,c, and k?

Exactly so! Like Newton's method, leastsq needs an initial guess for p. You supply it as p_guess. When you see

scipy.optimize.leastsq(residuals,p_guess,args=(x,y))

you can think that as part of the leastsq algorithm (really the Levenburg-Marquardt algorithm) as a first pass, leastsq calls residuals(p_guess,x,y). Notice the visual similarity between

(residuals,p_guess,args=(x,y))

and

residuals(p_guess,x,y)

It may help you remember the order and meaning of the arguments to leastsq.

residuals, like sigmoid returns a numpy array. The values in the array are squared, and then summed. This is the number to beat. p_guess is then varied as leastsq looks for a set of values which minimizes residuals(p_guess,x,y).

4.) Is the p that is sent as an argument to the residuals() and sigmoid() functions the same p that will be output by leastsq(), and the leastsq() function is using that p internally before returning it?

Well, not exactly. As you know by now, p_guess is varied as leastsq searches for the p value that minimizes residuals(p,x,y). The p (er, p_guess) that is sent to leastsq has the same shape as the p that is returned by leastsq. Obviously the values should be different unless you are a hell of a guesser :)

5.) Can p and p_guess have any number of elements, depending on the complexity of the equation being used as a model, as long as the number of elements in p is equal to the number of elements in p_guess?

Yes. I haven't stress-tested leastsq for very large numbers of parameters, but it is a thrillingly powerful tool.

share|improve this answer
    
+1 Beat me to it! Nice example, too. –  Joe Kington Nov 29 '10 at 22:11
    
Thanks, @Joe Kington :) –  unutbu Nov 29 '10 at 22:17

I don't think you're going to get good results with a polynomial fit of any degree -- since all polynomials go to infinity for sufficiently large and small X, but a sigmoid curve will asymptotically approach some finite value in each direction.

I'm not a Python programmer, so I don't know if numpy has a more general curve fitting routine. If you have to roll your own, perhaps this article on Logistic regression will give you some ideas.

share|improve this answer
    
The sigmoid is really just a special case of the logistic function. +1 for pointing it out that a polynomial won't do the trick. –  Chris Nov 29 '10 at 21:51

For logistic regression in Python, the scikits-learn exposes high-performance fitting code:

http://scikit-learn.sourceforge.net/modules/linear_model.html#logistic-regression

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.