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I am trying to find a way to use C++ classes in D.

http://www.digitalmars.com/d/2.0/cpp_interface.html

D cannot call C++ special member functions, and vice versa. These include constructors, destructors, conversion operators, operator overloading, and allocators.

So, I am attempting to dumb down these C++ functions to C style function calls. Here is the proof I am working with.

helper.h

class someClass {
    public:
        someClass();
        char *whatSayYou();
};

extern "C"
{
    someClass *hearMeOut();
}

helper.cpp

#include "helper.h"

someClass::someClass()
{

}

char *someClass::whatSayYou()
{
    return "Everything is gravy";
}


someClass *hearMeOut()
{
    return new someClass;
}

main.d

import std.stdio;

int main(string[] args)
{
    someClass *awesomeExample = hearMeOut();
    char *shoutoutToTheWorld = awesomeExample.whatSayYou();
    writefln(std.string.toString(shoutoutToTheWorld));
    return 0;
}


extern (C++)
{
    interface someClass
    {
        char *whatSayYou();
    }

    someClass *hearMeOut();
}

And here is how I complied it.

g++-4.3 -c -I code/dg3d_helper -I /usr/local/include/ -o code/dg3d_helper/helper.o code/dg3d_helper/helper.cpp
code/dg3d_helper/helper.cpp: In member function ‘char* someClass::whatSayYou()’:
code/dg3d_helper/helper.cpp:19: warning: deprecated conversion from string constant to ‘char*’
gdc-4.3 -g -c -I code/ -o code/main.o code/main.d
gdc-4.3 -g -I code/ -o main code/dg3d_helper/helper.o code/main.o -lstdc++

And I get a segmentation fault as soon as the method is called.

Program received signal SIGSEGV, Segmentation fault.
0x0000000000402fa0 in _Dmain (args=...) at code/main.d:7
7       char *shoutoutToTheWorld = awesomeExample.whatSayYou();
(gdb) bt
#0  0x0000000000402fa0 in _Dmain (args=...) at code/main.d:7
#1  0x000000000041b1aa in _D9dgccmain211_d_run_mainUiPPaPUAAaZiZi2goMFZv ()
#2  0x000000000041b235 in _d_run_main ()
#3  0x00002aaaab8cfc4d in __libc_start_main () from /lib/libc.so.6
#4  0x0000000000402d59 in _start ()
share|improve this question
    
Will GDB work with D? At least that [or something like it] would tell you where to start looking. Debuggers FTW –  Chris Nov 29 '10 at 21:42
    
You can also build the latest SWIG from SVN and use it (it supports D thanks to klickverbot's work). I'm trying to learn to use it myself to wrap Irrlicht (in my spare time). –  jcao219 Nov 29 '10 at 23:43
    
I am very overwhelmed with all the options in gdb. All I know how to do at this point is backtrace. I am not sure what else it can do to help me figure out the problem. –  Jacks_Gulch Nov 30 '10 at 14:34
    
I get the segmentation fault compiling the example from the D documentation. I think you have a compiler bug here. Best to report it. –  Winston Ewert Nov 30 '10 at 15:25
    
Also, regarding GDB, try using print variableName –  Winston Ewert Nov 30 '10 at 15:25

3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

You've not exposed a C interface. You still have your function returning a C++ class rather than something recognizable by C. Expose your class as void *s instead. For example:

class MyClass
{
//private members
public:
//public members
    int MyMethod(int argument) const;
    virtual float MyVirtualMethod();
    virtual ~MyClass() {}
};

class MySecondClass : public MyClass
{
public:
    virtual float MyVirtualMethod();
    int MyMethod2(int argument) const;
};

extern "C" {
    void * CreateMyClass()
    {
        return static_cast<void *>(new(std::nothrow) MyClass);
    }

    void * CreateMySecondClass()
    {
        //Note the cast to the base class first (This is needed
        //because it might actually change the position of the pointer,
        //which would not be automatically adjusted later)
        return static_cast<void *>(static_cast<MyClass *>(new(std::nothrow) MySecondClass));
    }

    int CallMyClassMethod(void * thisMember, int argument)
    {
        return static_cast<MyClass *>(thisMember)->MyMethod(argument);
    }

    float CallMyVirtualMethod(void * thisMember)
    {
        return static_cast<MyClass *>(thisMember)->MyVirtualMethod();
    }

    int CallMyMethod2(void thisMember, int argument)
    {
        MyClass * convertedToMyClass = static_cast<MyClass *>(thisMember);
        MySecondClass * asSecondClass = dynamic_cast<MySecondClass *>(convertedToMyClass);
        if (!asSecondClass)
        {
            //Return error (thisMember not an instance of MySecondClass)
        }
        else
        {
            return asSecondClass->MyMethod2(argument);
        }
    }

    void DestroyMyClass(void * classMember)
    {
        delete static_cast<MyClass *>(classMember);
    }
}

This will make your class usable by D, but also by C (and every other language that binds to C) as well.

share|improve this answer
    
Unlike every other programming language out there, D doesn't actually need a pure C interface. D allows for partial C++ compatibility. See the page he linked at the top of the question. –  Ken Bloom Nov 29 '10 at 21:47
    
@Ken: Yes, but if one is going to take the time to expose it as a C interface, one should probably expose a C interface. ;). D does know how to turn void * into whatever the OP wants, right? (Not sure, never programmed in D before) –  Billy ONeal Nov 29 '10 at 21:50
    
@Billy: Using a void* is probably not that smart, I'd much rather just use a direct MyClass*- it doesn't matter once you export from a DLL but helps maintain safety and sanity in the C++ world. –  Puppy Nov 29 '10 at 22:07
    
@DeadMG: Err.. I don't understand. You'd not be able to compile the C header if you used some class pointer because the class wouldn't exist in C. :/ –  Billy ONeal Nov 29 '10 at 22:19
    
@Billy ONeal: it takes a fraction of the work to expose the interface if the only thing you have to wrap is the constructor. –  Ken Bloom Nov 30 '10 at 0:30

Your C++ version returns by value.

Your D version expects it to return by reference.

Essentially, your C++ version sticks a copy of someClass on the stack. D thinks that C++ will have put a pointer on the stack. It tries to interpret the copy of someClass as a pointer, and bad things happen.

The problem is that in D, classes and interfaces are always returned by reference. C++ returns everything by value unless you indicate that its either a reference or a pointer.

Thus you need this:

someClass * hearMeOut() { return new someClass; }

Don't forget to delete it later.

share|improve this answer
    
+1 because this answer maintains compatibility with virtual functions, which my answer makes difficult. –  Billy ONeal Nov 29 '10 at 21:54
    
Nope. Still the same result. Program received signal SIGSEGV, Segmentation fault. 0x0000000000402fa4 in _Dmain (args=...) at code/main.d:7 7 char *shoutoutToTheWorld = awesomeExample.whatSayYou(); –  Jacks_Gulch Nov 30 '10 at 13:51
    
@Jacks_Depression, you can only call virtual functions this way. –  Winston Ewert Nov 30 '10 at 15:14
    
@Winston: Most of the functions I am trying to call are virtual. But if I need to call some that are not. Is there a solution different than that of Billy ONeal? –  Jacks_Gulch Nov 30 '10 at 15:31
    
@Jacks_Depression, I don't believe D has support for calling the non-virtual methods. You'd probably have to use Billy's method. (If it were me, I'd use gccxml to parse my C++ header file, use the resulting xml file to generate a C wrapper on the C++ and a D wrapper class on the C wrappers. Then I could just use my C++ class in D naturally. But that may be more effort then is worthwhile.) –  Winston Ewert Nov 30 '10 at 15:46

D can only call virtual C++ methods with the interface trick.

Furthermore you tell D hearMeOut() used C++ calling convention and C++ it has C calling conv. Correct me if I'm wrong, but this should yield problems too.

Imo interfacing with C++ this way is practically limited to calling simple functions since in most C++ libraries you always have non-virtual methods, operators and whatever else in classes, not to mention namespaces which D can't cope with as well.

D SFML does it the way Billy described. It's a tedious job to maintain the C wrapper plus the D wrapper. Some (semi-)automatic approach like SWIG should be used, then you also get nice cross-language polymorphism.

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