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For the life of me I can't figure out why this is not working. Basically, I created the pipe with the inherit bit set to true, and created two child processes, and used the STARTUPINFO structure to set the input and output handles as one would need, but the pipe seems broken (the second process writes no output to the console, even though output is expected)

I know the problem does not lie in my test program (BitTwiddler.exe) because I performed the same operation using CMD.exe, and everything works as expected.

Below is a minimal reproduction of what I have. What have I done incorrectly?

#include "windows.h"

int main()
{
    PROCESS_INFORMATION piSource, piDest;
    HANDLE hPipeIn, hPipeOut;
    HANDLE hIn = GetStdHandle(STD_INPUT_HANDLE);
    HANDLE hOut = GetStdHandle(STD_OUTPUT_HANDLE);
    STARTUPINFOW suSource, suDest;
    ZeroMemory(&suSource, sizeof(suSource));
    ZeroMemory(&suDest, sizeof(suDest));
    suSource.cb = suDest.cb = sizeof(STARTUPINFOW);
    suSource.dwFlags = suDest.dwFlags = STARTF_USESTDHANDLES;
    SECURITY_ATTRIBUTES sa;
    sa.nLength = sizeof(sa);
    sa.lpSecurityDescriptor = 0;
    sa.bInheritHandle = TRUE;
    if (CreatePipe(&hPipeIn, &hPipeOut, &sa, 0) == 0)
    {
        return GetLastError();
    }
    suSource.hStdInput = hIn;
    suSource.hStdError = suSource.hStdOutput = hPipeIn;
    suDest.hStdInput = hPipeOut;
    suDest.hStdError = suDest.hStdOutput = hOut;
    std::wstring cmdLineA(L"BitTwiddler 1"), cmdLineB(L"BitTwiddler 0");
    cmdLineA.push_back(0); cmdLineB.push_back(0);
    if (CreateProcessW(0, &cmdLineA[0], 0, 0, TRUE, 0, 0, 0, &suSource, &piSource) == 0)
    {
        return GetLastError();
    }
    CloseHandle(piSource.hThread);
    if (CreateProcessW(0, &cmdLineB[0], 0, 0, TRUE, 0, 0, 0, &suDest, &piDest) == 0)
    {
        return GetLastError();
    }
    CloseHandle(piDest.hThread);
    HANDLE hArray[2];
    hArray[0] = piSource.hProcess;
    hArray[1] = piDest.hProcess;
    WaitForMultipleObjects(2, hArray, TRUE, INFINITE);
    CloseHandle(hArray[0]);
    CloseHandle(hArray[1]);
    return 0;
}

(In case anyone's interested, BitTwiddler is:

#include <windows.h>
#include <sstream>
#include <iostream>
#include <string>

int main(int argc, char *argv[])
{
    std::size_t opt = 0;
    argc--; argv++;
    if (argc == 0)
    {
        return 0;
    }
    else
    {
        std::istringstream converter(*argv);
        converter >> opt;
    }
    switch(opt)
    {
    case 0:
        {
            std::wstring currentLine;
            while(std::getline(std::wcin, currentLine))
            {
                std::wcout << "Got somepin: " << currentLine << std::endl;
            }
        }
        break;
    case 1:
        for (;;)
        {
            std::wcout << L"Hello World!" << std::endl;
            Sleep(1000);
        }
        break;
    case 2:
        return -1;
    default:
        std::wcout << "Unknown option.";
        return 0;
    }
    return 0;
}

), but I really don't think that matters.

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1 Answer

up vote 5 down vote accepted

You misplaced the read and write ends :)

CreatePipe has the prototype

BOOL CreatePipe(
  PHANDLE hReadPipe,  // can only read from this
  PHANDLE hWritePipe,  // can only write to this
  LPSECURITY_ATTRIBUTES lpPipeAttributes,
  DWORD nSize
);

You can't call ReadFile (or in your case std::getline) from a Write-only handle, and vice versa. If you replaced your std::getline calls with a simple ReadFile call, you'd get an ACCESS_DENIED error, confirming this fact, since your STD_INPUT_HANDLE in the child process was not opened for GENERIC_READ.

The fix is as follows:

suSource.hStdError = suSource.hStdOutput = hPipeOut;  // must be the write pipe!
suDest.hStdInput = hPipeIn;  // must be the read pipe.

Perhaps the names you assigned are confusing. If you called them as per the formal parameters, the error would be clearer:

suSource.hStdError = suSource.hStdOutput = hReadPipe;  // clearly wrong.
suDest.hStdInput = hWritePipe;  // as above -- expects a read-handle.
share|improve this answer
    
Lol -- I conceptually screwed up that one good. I was thinking from the prospective of the pipe... i.e. "The pipe reads from here and writes to here"... but the perspective in the docs are from the prospective of the programs, i.e. "You read from the pipe here and write to the pipe here". :sigh: Thanks :) –  Billy ONeal Nov 30 '10 at 15:24
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