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I'm very sorry for my previous miswording. So I rephrased this question as follows:

The simplest C++0x code below should be not valid:

#include <functional>

template<class T_>
void f(T_ obj) 
{
    Obj++; // OK that is as expected.
    static_cast<int&>(obj) = 2; // Though ugly, this is still OK.

    obj = 2; // However, this line will generate a compiler error
}

int main()
{
    int i = 1;
    f(std::tr1::ref(i));
}

Who can tell me the exact semantics of ref?

share|improve this question
6  
What is ref? Please post a complete, compilable program. – James McNellis Nov 30 '10 at 8:00
    
This is not valid C++.. – Simone Nov 30 '10 at 8:01
2  
-1 incomplete code, undefined terms, assertion of subjective belief about the undefined thing – Cheers and hth. - Alf Nov 30 '10 at 8:04
1  
I like this one. Maybe it'll be the start of a new trend. Post example of construct doing what it's supposed to do and then bitch about it's inability to do anything. – Crazy Eddie Nov 30 '10 at 8:13
1  
Who the heck closed the question after it was actually fixed? – Let_Me_Be Nov 30 '10 at 8:24
up vote 1 down vote accepted

The cause of the error is that there is no suitable assignment operator to apply. The only candidate is this:

reference_wrapper& operator=(const reference_wrapper<T>& x);

A reference_wrapper acts as a reference with the help of implicit conversion operators:

operator T& () const;

However, an implicit conversion will not happen on the left side of the assignment operator.

If you are expecting this template to support reference_wrapper, perhaps you can work around in ways like this:

#include <functional>
#include <iostream>

template <class T>
T& get(T& value)
{
    return value;
}

template <class T>
T& get(std::reference_wrapper<T>& w)
{
    return w.get();
}


template<class T_>
void f(T_ obj)
{
    //obj = 2;
    get(obj) = 2;
}

int main()
{
    int i = 1;
    f(std::ref(i));
    std::cout << i << '\n';
    f(3.14); //at the same time, we want this also to work
}

As to why reference_wrapper doesn't have an assignment operator for stored type, not sure. Boost's version doesn't have either, and they simply say that this class "usually allows the function templates to work on references unmodified". Guess this is just not one of those cases.

share|improve this answer
    
Your solution works. But that looks not like the most uniform way to treat a real reference and a reference_wrapper. In my opinion, get(obj) = 2; is far from elegant than obj = 2; – xmllmx Nov 30 '10 at 9:06
    
@UncleBens: "As to why reference_wrapper doesn't have an assignment operator for stored type, not sure. Boost's version doesn't have either, and they simply say that this class "usually allows the function templates to work on references unmodified". Guess this is just not one of those cases." – xmllmx Nov 30 '10 at 9:12
    
@UncleBens: Your explanation is convincing. I think this is by design to prevent modify the referenced object implictly. – xmllmx Nov 30 '10 at 9:13
    
Otherwise, it is easy to do that by adding a membe function like T& operator =(const T& obj) { return m_realObj = obj; }.Deliberately not to provide such a member funtion can prevent programmers from misuse. – xmllmx Nov 30 '10 at 9:16
    
@xmllmx reference_wrapper is a wrapper for passing references, if you would allow assignment operator, it would break its semantics. What would the compiler do in this case int x; int &y = x; reference_wrapper<int> z = y; int a = 10; int &b = a; z = b;? Would it store 10 into x or just change the wrapper reference? – Let_Me_Be Nov 30 '10 at 9:18

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