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Taken from wikipedia:

In object-oriented computer programming, a factory is an object for creating other objects. It is an abstraction of a constructor, and can be used to implement various allocation schemes.

Could anyone please explain when a factory class is required or beneficial?

I am currently working on a project where I have a class and use the constructor to initialize an object (duh!) but it can fail and not initialize at all. I have a Success property to check if it was created properly. Is this a good example for when a factory class should be implemented? This way the Create() method can return null and I can get rid of the Success property. Do I have the right idea?

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factory class or factory method? –  Bozho Nov 30 '10 at 10:00

4 Answers 4

up vote 7 down vote accepted

The textbook example for a Factory situation is when you have an interface and several implementations, but you don't want to expose the implementations. You implement a factory (method or class) that produces instances of different implementations based on the parameters you pass it; however, since it returns them by the interface type, the caller will not be burdened with implementation details.

Real-world example: Suppose you have defined an interface for a stream reader, and implementations to read from a local file, a network resource, and stdin. You then write a factory method that takes a single parameter (the URI), and returns a suitable reader. The caller doesn't need to know about implementation details. The best part is, when you decide you want to support another input method, say, data: URIs, you just add another implementation and add it to the factory - you won't need to change anything in the calling code.

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... and thats what OCP is all about :) Nice answer. –  Marcus Nov 30 '10 at 13:47
    
thank you, that does make sense –  Marlon Nov 30 '10 at 18:30

A factory's purpose is to determine, at run-time and hence potentially and often with data unavailable when the program was compiled, which of many classes, all derived from a specific class with virtual methods, should capture that data for your program.

The point is that polymorphic language features allow you to work with different types of data (sharing a common base class), invoking the type-appropriate behaviours. To benefit from this, you need to have objects of different derived types. When learning about this in a Comp Sci course, you probably hard-code creation of a few of each of the Derived types and play with them through pointers to the base class. In complex real-world problems, rather than hard-coding creation it is often driven off data arriving from the programs input, such as database tables, files, and sockets. Depending on what exactly you see at each point, you want to create an appropriately-typed object to represent it, but you'll probably need to keep a record of it using a compile-time known type: the pointer to base class. Then, not only can you preform the operations that the base class promises - some of which may involve dynamic dispatch to the derived class's implementation, but you can also - if necessary - determine exactly what the real type of the data is and invoke actions accordingly.

For example, say you read the following file, which shows how you've collected different types of data for each:

elephant name Tip-Toes partner Mega
mule name Dare-You mane_length 132

You have the following class heirarchy to represent these:

struct Animal
{
    Animal(const std::string& name) : name_(name) { }

    virtual void eat_from(Supplies&) = 0; // animals must do in their own way...
    virtual bool can_jump() { return false; } // some animals might, assume not...

    std::string name_;
};

struct Elephant : Animal
{
    Elephant(const std::string& name, const std::string& partner)
      : Animal(name), partner_(partner)
    { }

    std::string partner_;

    virtual void eat_from(Supplies&) { supplies.consume(Tofu, 10 * kg); }
    void swing_trunk(); // something specific to elephants
};

struct Mule : Animal
{
    Mule(const std::string& name, double kgs) : Animal(name), kilograms_(kgs) { }
    double kilograms_;

    virtual void eat_from(Supplies&) { supplies.consume(Grass, 2 * kg); }
    virtual bool can_jump() { return true; }
};

The factory method's job is to distinguish elephant from mule and return a new object of the appropriate type (derived from - but not simply - Animal):

Animal* factory(std::istringstream& input)
{
    std::string what, name;
    if (input >> what && input >> name)
    {
        if (what == "elephant")
        {
            std::string partner;
            if (input >> partner)
                return new Elephant(name, partner);
        }
        else if (what == "mule")
        {
            double mane_length;
            if (input >> mane_length)
                return new Mule(name, mane_length);
        }
    }
    // can only reach here on unparsable input...
    throw runtime_error("can't parse input");
}

You can then store Animal*s and perform operations on them:

std::vector<Animal*> animals;
// we expect 30 animals...
for (int i = 0; i < 30; ++i) animals.push_back(factory(std::cin));

// do things to each animal...
for (int i = 0; i < 30; ++i)
{
    Animal* p_unknown = animals[i];

    std::cout << p_unknown->name() << '\n';

    if (Elephant* p = dynamic_cast<Elephant*>(p_unknown))
        p->swing_trunk();
}

Returning to your question:

I am currently working on a project where I have a class and use the constructor to initialize an object (duh!) but it can fail and not initialize at all. I have a Success property to check if it was created properly. Is this a good example for when a factory class should be implemented? This way the Create() method can return null and I can get rid of the Success property. Do I have the right idea?

No, not a situation where a factory is useful, as there's still only one type involved. Just stick with what you've got (in an OO sense), but you could choose to throw an exception, abort the program etc. rather than set a flag that the called may or may not bother to check.

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nice answer, is there a difference between factor method and factory class? –  TheIndependentAquarius Jan 28 '12 at 10:02
1  
"method" is just another name for "function", and clearly functions can be put into a class for group any data and support functions they may need - then you have a factory class, but it doesn't really change the way things are working - just encapsulates it better. It gets more interesting - and meaningfully different - when you have an abstract factory class, which means that the factory function (and/or support code) can be virtual, and any of several factory implementations may be invoked. For example, select a "XML-parsing" vs "JSON-parsing" factory once then use afterwards.... –  Tony D Jan 31 '12 at 1:05
    
Thanks Tony. The comment is coloured orange? –  TheIndependentAquarius Jan 31 '12 at 4:34
1  
@Bart Wasn't "discussing" anything. It was just a "fly by" comment. Will delete it soon. –  TheIndependentAquarius Jan 31 '12 at 10:44

My opinion on the Factory pattern has always been somewhat different, but I'll give it anyway.

A Factory is for creating a set of related types. Related does not mean that they necessarily implement the same interface(s) exactly. Related means that if you have one type you need to instantiate, and then you need to create another object and the concrete (implementation) type of the second object depends on the concrete type of the first object, you need a Factory.

A Factory that only creates one type of object (there is no "relatedness") is not a Factory but more like a Strategy.

My above definitions imply that Factory isn't used or needed as much as you would think.

And for objects that fail to initialize, I recommend the fail-fast approach by throwing an exception instead of relying on a status field.

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They key idea of the factory pattern is that you hide away different implementations of similar functionality by providing a unified creation mechanism. Whether you use interfaces, abstract base classes, function pointers, or duck-typing to express the relatedness, is relatively unimportant and depends on the programming language and personal preference. –  tdammers Nov 30 '10 at 13:55
    
"Related means that if you have one type you need to instantiate, and then you need to create another object and the concrete (implementation) type of the second object depends on the concrete type of the first object, you need a Factory." - that's just not right at all. A clone function satisfies your definition of a factory, despite having only one type of object it may create. More crucially, you describe an abstract factory - which is a subset of factories and considerably more limited and complicated than the simple case. –  Tony D Jan 31 '12 at 6:07

I will try a simple answer :)

From Wikipedia.

Use the factory pattern when:

  • The creation of the object precludes reuse without significantly duplicating code.
  • The creation of the object requires access to information or resources not appropriate to contain within the composing object.
  • The lifetime management of created objects needs to be centralised to ensure consistent behavior.

So I think you don't 'need' a factory in your particular case. But I'd say having one does not hurt.

A common use for factories would be if you want to return an interface and hide the implementing class.

For instance:

public final class LoginFactory {

private final static Map<SomeEnum, LoginInterface> IMPLEMENTERS = new HashMap<SomeEnum, LoginInterface>();

static {
    IMPLEMENTERS.put(SomeEnum.QUICK, new QuickerLoginImpl());
    IMPLEMENTERS.put(SomeEnum.SECURE, new SecureLoginImpl());
}

public static LoginInterface getLoginImpl(SomeEnum type) { // my naming is bad ...
    return IMPLEMENTERS.get(type);
}

}

This way you can change your SecureLoginImpl to MoreSecureLoginImpl for example without the user of your API even noticing.

You might also want to have a look at this wiki page Abstract Factory pattern.

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the example is in java btw sorry ... I could give you an example in something else if you need it. –  Simeon Nov 30 '10 at 11:16
    
sorry :) i should have stated the language in the question –  Marlon Nov 30 '10 at 18:29
    
you need it in C++ ? –  Simeon Dec 1 '10 at 8:28

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