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I have the following code (include-guards omitted for simplicity's sake):

= foo.hpp =

struct FOO
{
  int not_used_in_this_sample;
  int not_used_in_this_sample2;
};

= main.cpp =

#include "foo_generator.hpp"
#include "foo.hpp"

int main()
{
  FOO foo = FooGenerator::createFoo(0xDEADBEEF, 0x12345678);

  return 0;
}

= foo_generator.hpp =

struct FOO; // FOO is only forward-declared

class FooGenerator
{
  public:

    // Note: we return a FOO, not a FOO&
    static FOO createFoo(size_t a, size_t b);
};

= foo_generator.cpp =

#include "foo_generator.hpp"
#include "foo.hpp"

FOO FooGenerator::createFoo(size_t a, size_t b)
{
  std::cout << std::hex << a << ", " << b << std::endl;

  return FOO();
}

This code, as it stands, compiles perfectly fine without any warning. If my understanding is correct, it should output:

deadbeef, 12345678

But instead, it randomly displays:

12345678, 32fb23a1

Or just crashes.

If I replace the forward-declaration of FOO in foo_generator.hpp with #include "foo.hpp", then it works.

So here is my question: Does returning a forward-declared structure lead to undefined behavior ? Or what can possibly go wrong ?

Compiler used: MSVC 9.0 and 10.0 (both show the issue)

share|improve this question
    
Why should it output that values if you don't assign them in the constructor? –  Simone Nov 30 '10 at 10:34
    
@Simone: because of the std::cout. The a and b values were just added to demonstrate what is likely to be stack corruption. –  ereOn Nov 30 '10 at 10:37
    
Oh, I see. With g++ v 4.5.0 it displays the correct values. –  Simone Nov 30 '10 at 10:41
    
Your code runs just fine for me using MSVC10 in both Debug and Release mode. The output is deadbeef and 12345678 as expected. –  Nikola Smiljanić Nov 30 '10 at 11:43
    
@Nikola: unfortunately, this behavior seems to occur only under some rare conditions. I have this pattern twice in my project (in the very same files actually) : in one case it always works in the other case it always fails. Really hard to reproduce. –  ereOn Dec 1 '10 at 7:54

3 Answers 3

up vote 7 down vote accepted

That should be fine according to 8.3.5.6: "The type of a parameter or the return type for a function declaration that is not a definition may be an incomplete class type."

share|improve this answer
    
That's what I needed. Thanks ! –  ereOn Dec 1 '10 at 7:57

I guess I got the same problem. It happens with small return value types and the order of headers inclusion matters. To avoid it don't use return value type forward declaration or include headers in the same order.

For a possible explanation look at this:

func.h

struct Foo;
Foo func();

func.cpp

#include "func.h"
#include "foo.h"
Foo func()
{
    return Foo();
}

foo.h

struct Foo
{
    int a;
};

Notice that whole Foo fits in a single CPU register.

func.asm (MSVS 2005)

$T2549 = -4                     ; size = 4
___$ReturnUdt$ = 8                  ; size = 4
?func@@YA?AUFoo@@XZ PROC                ; func

; 5    :     return Foo();

    xor eax, eax
    mov DWORD PTR $T2549[ebp], eax
    mov ecx, DWORD PTR ___$ReturnUdt$[ebp]
    mov edx, DWORD PTR $T2549[ebp]
    mov DWORD PTR [ecx], edx
    mov eax, DWORD PTR ___$ReturnUdt$[ebp]

When func() is declared Foo's size is unknown. It doesn't know how Foo could be returned. So func() expects pointer to return value storage as its parameter. Here it's _$ReturnUdt$. Value of Foo() is copied there.

If we change headers order in func.cpp we get:

func.asm

$T2548 = -4                     ; size = 4
?func@@YA?AUFoo@@XZ PROC                ; func

; 5    :     return Foo();

    xor eax, eax
    mov DWORD PTR $T2548[ebp], eax
    mov eax, DWORD PTR $T2548[ebp]

Now compiler knows that Foo is small enough so it is returned via register and no extra parameter needed.

main.cpp

#include "foo.h"
#include "func.h"
int main()
{
    func();
    return 0;
}

Notice that here Foo's size is known when func() is declared.

main.asm

; 5    :     func();

    call    ?func@@YA?AUFoo@@XZ         ; func
    mov DWORD PTR $T2548[ebp], eax

; 6    :     return 0;

So compiler assumes func() will return value through register. It doesn't pass a pointer to temp location to store return value. But if func() expects the pointer it writes to memory corrupting the stack.

Let's change headers order so func.h goes first.

main.asm

; 5    :     func();

    lea eax, DWORD PTR $T2548[ebp]
    push    eax
    call    ?func@@YA?AUFoo@@XZ         ; func
    add esp, 4

; 6    :     return 0;

Compiler passes the pointer that func() expects so no stack corruption results.

If Foo's size were bigger than 2 integers compiler would always pass the pointer.

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you for the detailed explanation. Here is my +1. –  ereOn Mar 27 '11 at 14:25
    
We came to pretty much the same conclusion when returning a forward-declared SDL_Color struct (32 bits in size) caused MSVC to produce segfaulting binaries. –  AI0867 Jun 18 at 9:36

It works fine for me under GCC. I don't know why it wouldn't, since foo.hpp is included before foo_generator.hpp.

share|improve this answer
    
I reversed the order of the includes, sorry: this was misleading. I have this pattern for several structures in my code, and the "bug" happens only for some of them. However, this structure has nothing special compared to the other. It could be a compiler bug but it is very much more likely that something is wrong in my code. –  ereOn Nov 30 '10 at 10:39

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