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I have a lot of txt files like this:

Title 1
Text 1(more then 1 line)

And I would like to make one csv file from all of them that it will look like this:

Title 1,Text 1
Title 2,Text 2
Title 3,Text 3
etc

How could I do it? I think that awk is good for it but don't know how to realize it.

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1  
It would help if you formatted your code in a readable manner and showed some example input data and what you'd like the output data to look like. You say "bash", but the only "bash" is the for loop and the redirection. The bulk of it is AWK. –  Dennis Williamson Nov 30 '10 at 16:29

3 Answers 3

May I suggest:

paste -d, file1 file2 file3

To handle large numbers of files, max 40 per output file (untested, but close):

xargs -n40 files... echo >tempfile
num=1
for line in $(<tempfile)
do
    paste -d, $line >outfile.$num
    let num=num+1
done
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This is approximately what you posted with some improvements.

for text in *
do
    awk 'BEGIN {q="\""; print q}
         NR==1 {
                gsub(" "," ")    # why?
                gsub("Title: *","")
                print
               }
         NR>1  {
                gsub(" "," ")    # why?
                gsub("Content: *","")
                gsub(q,q q)
                print
               }

         END {print q}' "$text" >> ../final
done

Edit:

If you have a bunch of files that consist of only two lines, try this:

sed 'N;s/\n/,/' file*.txt

If the files contain more than two lines each then it will put each pair of lines on the same line separated by a comma.

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Yes, but it doesn't work. In result I get one column, not two columns. –  llokely Dec 1 '10 at 9:39
1  
@llokely: does it work better if you change the first print to printf $0? It would really help a lot if you included some examples in your question. –  Dennis Williamson Dec 1 '10 at 17:37
    
No, nothing changed –  llokely Dec 1 '10 at 21:04
    
@llokely: Well, if you don't provide more information then there's really nothing more I can do. I can't read your mind and at this point I'm doing little more than guessing. –  Dennis Williamson Dec 1 '10 at 22:37
    
I have files in one directory and I need to make one csv file from them and I need that first row will go to the first column and other content will go to the second column. I had such script to make it but I lost it and script which I provided was a alpha version of it and it doesn't work but I think that it could help in way to make a good one. –  llokely Dec 2 '10 at 10:37

Given 3 files containing the following data:

file1.txt

Heading 1
Text 1
Text 2

file2.txt

Heading 2
Text 1

file3.txt

Heading 3
Text 1
text 2
Text 3

The expected results are:

Heading 1,Text 1,Text 2 
Heading 2,Text1 
Heading 3,Text 1,text 2,Text 3

This is accomplished using the program createcsv.awk below invoked as

gawk -f createcsv.awk file1.txt file2.txt file3.txt

createcsv.awk

{
  if (1 == FNR) {
     # It is the first line of a new file
     if (csvline != "") {
       # First file or empty files we can ignore
       print csvline;
     }
     csvline = "";
     delimiter = "";
  }
  csvline = csvline delimiter $0;
  if ("" == delimiter) { delimiter="," }
}
END{
 print csvline;
}
share|improve this answer
    
Or invoke as gawk -f createcsv.awk file*.txt –  jgreep Dec 7 '10 at 20:13

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