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Is it possible to have something like the following:

class C
{
    public Foo Foos[int i]
    {
        ...
    }

    public Bar Bars[int i]
    {
        ...
    }
}

If not, then are what are some of the ways I can achieve this? I know I could make functions called getFoo(int i) and getBar(int i) but I was hoping to do this with properties.

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7 Answers 7

up vote 11 down vote accepted

Not in C#, no.

However, you can always return collections from properties, as follows:

public IList<Foo> Foos
{
    get { return ...; }
}

public IList<Bar> Bars
{
    get { return ...; }
}

IList<T> has an indexer, so you can write the following:

C whatever = new C();
Foo myFoo = whatever.Foos[13];

On the lines "return ...;" you can return whatever implements IList<T>, but you might what to return a read-only wrapper around your collection, see AsReadOnly() method.

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That's the solution I'm looking for. –  smack0007 Jan 10 '09 at 17:36

This from C# 3.0 spec

"Overloading of indexers permits a class, struct, or interface to declare multiple indexers, provided their signatures are unique within that class, struct, or interface."

public class MultiIndexer : List<string>  
{
    public string this[int i]
    {
        get{
            return this[i];
        }
    }
    public string this[string pValue]
    {
        get
        {
            //Just to demonstrate
            return this.Find(x => x == pValue);  
        }
    }      
}
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Try my IndexProperty class to enable multiple indexers in the same class

http://www.codeproject.com/Tips/319825/Multiple-Indexers-in-Csharp

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If you're trying to do something like this:

var myClass = new MyClass();

Console.WriteLine(myClass.Foos[0]);
Console.WriteLine(myClass.Bars[0]);

then you need to define the indexers on the Foo and Bar classes themselves - i.e. put all the Foo objects inside Foos, and make Foos a type instance that supports indexing directly.

To demonstrate using arrays for the member properties (since they already support indexers):

public class C {
    private string[] foos = new string[] { "foo1", "foo2", "foo3" };
    private string[] bars = new string[] { "bar1", "bar2", "bar3" };
    public string[] Foos { get { return foos; } }
    public string[] Bars { get { return bars; } }
}

would allow you to say:

 C myThing = new C();
 Console.WriteLine(myThing.Foos[1]);
 Console.WriteLine(myThing.Bars[2]);
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The problem is that you can't make them read-only as they're arrays, e.g. myThing.Foos[1] = null; –  Mike Scott Jan 10 '09 at 17:58

There IS a way.. if you define 2 new types to alow the compiler to distinguish the two different signatures...

  public struct EmployeeId
  { 
      public int val;
      public EmployeeId(int employeeId) { val = employeeId; }
  }
  public struct HRId
  { 
      public int val;
      public HRId(int hrId) { val = hrId; }
  }
  public class Employee 
  {
      public int EmployeeId;
      public int HrId;
      // other stuff
  }
  public class Employees: Collection<Employee>
  {
      public Employee this[EmployeeId employeeId]
      {
          get
             {
                foreach (Employee emp in this)
                   if (emp.EmployeeId == employeeId.val)
                      return emp;
                return null;
             }
      }
      public Employee this[HRId hrId]
      {
          get
             {
                foreach (Employee emp in this)
                   if (emp.HRId == hrId.val)
                      return emp;
                return null;
             }
      }
  }

Then to call it you would have to write:

Employee Bob = MyEmployeeCollection[new EmployeeID(34)];

Same thing applies even if the two indexers return different types...

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C# doesn't have return type overloading. You can define multiple indexers if their input parameters are different.

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No you cant do it. Only methods that can have their signatures differ only by return type are conversion operators. Indexers must have different input parameter types to get it to compile.

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