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int[] alist = new int [3];
alist.add("apple");
alist.add("banana");
alist.add("orange");

Say that I want to use the second item in the ArrayList. What is the coding in order to get the following output?

output:

banana

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5  
Your code will not compile: alist it an array, but you use it like an List -- this is impossible and alist is of type integer - you are not able to assign Strings to it. –  Ralph Nov 30 '10 at 12:03
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7 Answers

up vote 38 down vote accepted

You have ArrayList all wrong,

  • You can't have an integer array and assign a string value.
  • You cannot do a add() method in an array

Rather do this:

List<String> alist = new ArrayList<String>();
alist.add("apple");
alist.add("banana");
alist.add("orange");

String value = alist.get(1); //returns the 2nd item from list, in this case "banana"

Indexing is counted from 0 to N-1 where N is size() of list.

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Read more about Array and ArrayList

List<String> aList = new ArrayList<String>();
aList.add("apple");   
aList.add("banana");   
aList.add("orange");   
String result = alist.get(1);  //this will retrieve banana

Note: Index starts from 0 i.e. Zero

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Using an Array:

String[] fruits = new String[];
fruits[0]="apple";
fruits[1]="banana";
fruits[3]="orange";
System.out.println(fruits[1]);

Using an List

ArrayList<String> fruits = new ArrayList<String>();
fruits.add("apple");
fruits.add("banana");
fruits.add("orange");
System.out.println(fruits.get(1));
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In order to store Strings in an dynamic array (add-method) you can't define it as an array of integers ( int[3] ). You should declare it like this:

ArrayList<String> alist = new ArrayList<String>();
alist.add("apple"); 
alist.add("banana"); 
alist.add("orange"); 

System.out.println( alist.get(1) );
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Exactly as arrays in all C-like languages. The indexes start from 0. So, apple is 0, banana is 1, orange is 2 etc.

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Here is how I would write it.

String[] fruit = "apple banana orange".split(" ");
System.out.println(fruit[1]);
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You had to be fancy , lol. –  Buhake Sindi Nov 30 '10 at 13:24
2  
You are not serious, are you? Why not write your first line as String[] fruit = "applesbananasorange".replace('s', ' ').split(" ");? The CPU should be used, if there is already one. –  Mot Dec 1 '10 at 19:23
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The big difference between primitive arrays & object-based collections (e.g., ArrayList) is that the latter can grow (or shrink) dynamically. Primitive arrays are fixed in size: Once you create them, their size doesn't change (though the contents can).

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