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I am using SQL Server Express 2008 w/ AdventureWorksLT2008 DB to understand the different between Read committed & Read uncommitted.

According to Wikipedia: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Isolation_%28database_systems%29

READ COMMITTED

Data records retrieved by a query are not prevented from modification by some other transactions.

Assume there is a table named SalesLT.Address and a column AddressLine2 which all rows has blank value

alt text

Then i run this query :

SET TRANSACTION ISOLATION LEVEL READ COMMITTED

BEGIN TRANSACTION   
    update SalesLT.Address set AddressLine2 = 'new value'   

        BEGIN TRANSACTION
            select AddressLine2 from SalesLT.Address 

--Break Here 
/*      
        COMMIT TRANSACTION
COMMIT TRANSACTION
*/ 

So, you can see the first transaction haven't commited yet, and the second one start to query the data.

It resulting:

alt text

So why the second transaction can be retrieved the phantom data even the 1st transaction still not committed?

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1 Answer 1

up vote 5 down vote accepted

When data is read inside a transaction, any changes that have been made by that transaction are visible - within that tranasction only (although READ UNCOMMITTED changes this). So above, even though you've started a second, nested, transaction, you're still in scope of the first transaction and can thus read changed data and get 'the changed values'.

Another transaction, on a separate SPID for example, would block if it was using READ COMMITTED and attempted to read this data.

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1  
To add to this- open up a new SQL query window (this actually establishes a new connection) and attempt to query your table while your other connection has it modified within a transaction, and you'll see what you're expecting here- your table will be locked. –  Mike M. Nov 30 '10 at 14:13

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