Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I am trying to find the distance between two longitude and latitude points. I am trying ot use the great circle distance. This is the formula: alt text

I am not sure why but my program is not working. This is the result I am getting:

Change Angle: 0.00016244370761414
Earth Radius: 6371

RESULTS: 
Correct  Distance: 24.883 km
Computed Distance: 1.0349288612097

Source:

$latStart = 44.638;
$longStart = -63.587;

$latFinish = 44.644;
$longFinish = -63.597;


# Convert Input to Radians
$latStart = deg2Rad($latStart);
$longStart = deg2Rad($longStart);

$latFinish = deg2Rad($latFinish);
$longFinish = deg2Rad($longFinish);

# Because the Earth is not perfectly spherical, no single value serves as its 
# natural radius. Distances from points on the surface to the center range from 
# 6,353 km to 6,384 km (≈3,947–3,968 mi). Several different ways of modeling the 
# Earth as a sphere each yield a convenient mean radius of 6371 km (≈3,959 mi).
# http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Earth_radius
$earthRadius = 6371;

# difference in Long/Lat
$latChange = $latFinish - $latStart;
$longChange = $longFinish - $longStart;



# haversine formula 
# numerically stable for small distances
# http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Great-circle_distance
$changeAngle = 2 * asin(
                sqrt(
                        pow(sin($latChange/2),2) +
                        cos($latStart) * cos($latFinish) * pow(sin($longChange/2),2)
                )
        );



echo "Change Angle: $changeAngle\n";
echo "Earth Radius: $earthRadius\n";
share|improve this question

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Let's do a back-of-the-envelope check using a planar approximation. The difference in latitude is 0.006°, and the difference in longitude is 0.01°, but multiply by cosine of latitude to get 0.0075°. Apply Pythagoras:

>>> sqrt(0.006 ** 2 + 0.0075 ** 2)
0.0096046863561492727

which is about 0.000167 radians, pretty close to your computation. (Even more back-of-the-envelope check: a degree is about 69 miles, which is a bit over 100 km, so 0.01° should be a bit over 1 km.)

So I think it's your alleged "Correct distance" that's wrong, not your computation.

share|improve this answer
    
Yepp. I had wrong input. –  sixtyfootersdude Nov 30 '10 at 19:58

Your approach is loosely based on Pythagoras' Theorem -- I've always done it the hard way, i.e. something like (In reality, I pre-calculate the values for the axis and store them in the database alongside the data):

$startXAxis   = cos(deg2Rad($latStart)) * cos(deg2Rad($longStart));
$startYAxis   = cos(deg2Rad($latStart)) * sin(deg2Rad($longStart));
$startZAxis   = sin(deg2Rad($latStart));
$finishXAxis   = cos(deg2Rad($latFinish)) * cos(deg2Rad($longFinish));
$finishYAxis   = cos(deg2Rad($latFinish)) * sin(deg2Rad($longFinish));
$finishZAxis   = sin(deg2Rad($latFinish));

$changeAngle = acos($startXAxis * $finishXAxis + $startYAxis * $finishYAxis + $startZAxis * $finishZAxis);
share|improve this answer

Your formula looks different to my implementation. However mine's in .NET but I've unit tested it and it works well.

It's a slightly rewritten version of this: http://megocode3.wordpress.com/2008/02/05/haversine-formula-in-c/

/// <summary>
/// Implementation of the Haversine formula
/// For calculating the distance between 2 points on a sphere
/// http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Haversine_formula
/// </summary>
public class Haversine
{
    /// <summary>
    /// Calculate the distance between 2 points in miles or kilometers
    /// http://megocode3.wordpress.com/2008/02/05/haversine-formula-in-c/
    /// 
    /// This assumes sea level
    /// </summary>
    public double Distance(LatLon pos1, LatLon pos2, DistanceType type)
    {
        const double RADIUS_OF_EARTH_IN_MILES = 3963.1676;
        const double RADIUS_OF_EARTH_IN_KILOMETERS = 6378.1;

        //radius of the earth
        double R = (type == DistanceType.Miles) ? RADIUS_OF_EARTH_IN_MILES : RADIUS_OF_EARTH_IN_KILOMETERS;

        //Deltas
        double dLat = ToRadian(pos2.Lat - pos1.Lat);
        double dLon = ToRadian(pos2.Lon - pos1.Lon);

        double a = Math.Sin(dLat/2)*Math.Sin(dLat/2) + Math.Cos(ToRadian(pos1.Lat))*Math.Cos(ToRadian(pos2.Lat)) * Math.Sin(dLon / 2) * Math.Sin(dLon / 2);
        double c = 2 * Math.Asin(Math.Min(1, Math.Sqrt(a)));

        double d = R*c;
        return d;
    }

    /// <summary>
    /// Convert to Radians.
    /// </summary>
    private double ToRadian(double val)
    {
        return (Math.PI / 180) * val;
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, that is very helpful. I used your code to check mine. Turns out that I had mis-typed one of my input values. I swear that I had tripple checked that but I guess not. –  sixtyfootersdude Nov 30 '10 at 19:58

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.