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I am having a problem with a very simple regular expression.

I want to restrict the entry in a multi-line TextBox to just integers. The regular expression I have works fine in single line mode (for a single line TextBox, not using multiline option), but allows alpha characters to creep in when in multiline mode, but only once a new line has been entered.

My code (C#) is something like:

Regex regExpr = new Regex("^(\d*)$", RegexOptions.Multiline)
return regExpr.IsMatch(testString);

I want the following examples to be valid:

1

1\n

1\n2\n3

I want the following to be invalid

A

A1\n2

1\n2\nA3

Thanks in advance.

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3 Answers 3

up vote 0 down vote accepted

What about

(\d?\\n*)?
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That doesn't seem to restrict my input at all. Is it missing start and end markers? –  Darren Nov 30 '10 at 14:23
    
You're right, sorry for my mistake. Try this : ^(\\d+\\n*)+$ –  Nicolas Nov 30 '10 at 14:55
    
That doesn't fix the issue unfortunately. It matches "A1\n2\n3", which is the same problem as my original expression. I think the issue is very much a multi-line issue. I am not very experienced in regular expressions at all, but my theory is that because one of the lines in the above is valid, there is a match. –  Darren Nov 30 '10 at 15:06
    
I have just tried it without the RegexOptions.Multiline and I think it works. I will do a little more checking to see if I can implement a full solution. –  Darren Nov 30 '10 at 15:12
    
Thanks to the suggestions from Andrew and Nicolas, I have solved the problem by dropping the RegexOptions.Multiline and instead "wrapping" my one-line expression with "(" ... ""\n?)*". So the integer expression becomes "^((\d*)\n?)*$" and appears to work perfectly. –  Darren Nov 30 '10 at 15:40
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Do you want to destructively remove the alphas or just send it back for the user to re-enter the info?

to remove just do a search replace with with an empty result.

[^\d\n]

To check to see if there's anything other than a number and \n do the same thing only on the first occurrence error the page submit and send back to the user.

Since I don't know which .Net lang you're using I can only give general principles.

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I am using C# in a WPF application. I just want to return the result of the IsMatch call. I have edited my question accordingly. –  Darren Nov 30 '10 at 14:28
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You can match digits and newlines with:

Regex regExpr = new Regex("[\d\n]*", RegexOptions.Multiline)

This will match any number of digits and newlines. If you just want to make sure that the entered text doesn't have a NON digit, then use

Regex regExpr = new Regex("[\D\S]", RegexOptions.Multiline)

and if it matches, then you have an illegal entry.

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Hi Andrew, I'm afraid neither of these achieve what I want to achieve. The first allows "A1\n2\n3" through, the second doesn't allow the valid "1\n2\n3" through. I would prefer it to be a positive match rather than a "non match" because my question details a part of what I need, in some cases the regex is different (e.g. validating decimal entry or IP Address entry). –  Darren Nov 30 '10 at 14:53
    
The first regex is trying to capture the digits and newlines part of the text box. If you want to ensure that you only ever accept valid input, then do the following: Change RegexOptions to RegexOptions.Singleline and change the regex to "^[\d\n]*$" like you showed in your example. This will parse the entire string at once, and the ^ and $ will match the beginning and the end of the string. –  Andrew Nov 30 '10 at 15:07
    
Thanks to the suggestions from Andrew and Nicolas, I have solved the problem by dropping the RegexOptions.Multiline and instead "wrapping" my one-line expression with "(" ... ""\n?)*". So the integer expression becomes "^((\d*)\n?)*$" and appears to work perfectly. –  Darren Nov 30 '10 at 15:45
    
The Singleline modifier alters the behavior of the . (dot) metacharacter, allowing it to match linefeeds as well as all other characters. Multiline affects the anchors, ^ and $, allowing them to match at line boundaries in addition to their default behavior of matching at the beginning and end of the text. Singleline has no effect on the anchors, and Multiline doesn't affect the dot; they're completely independent. –  Alan Moore Nov 30 '10 at 23:49
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