Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I am writing a script to make chunks of a text and send it via SMS. Earlier today i was reviewing some code to split the string in chunks and i saw something I've never seen before. I'm talking about the ";" right after the "}" at the en of the snippet.

Why this colon? i know it works but i don't know if it adds some semantics or some instruction to the interpreter, anybody know what is this for?

while(1)
{
    $length = (strlen($output)+strlen($words[$i]));
    if($length>$new_max)
    {
        if(count($words) > 0)
        {
            $out_array[] = $output;
            $output = '';

        }
        else
        {
            break;    
        }
    }
    else
    {
        $output = $output." ".$words[$i];
        ++$i;
    };
};

EDIT: Looks clear that the semicolons as well as multiple semicolons together has no effect over the result, but, do you know if it has some effect to the interpreter? is it doing some task (internally) when it parses it?

share|improve this question
    
This raises a good question that nobody has touched on other than a "best guess". What happens at the compiler level when you have an empty statement like that? –  Steve Buzonas Feb 11 at 23:01

4 Answers 4

up vote 10 down vote accepted

I think that those 2 semicolons do nothing here. It is probably being interpreted as an empty expression immediately following the if/while.

share|improve this answer
    
I think it is meamingless but i want to make sure :) thanks. –  SubniC Nov 30 '10 at 15:38
    
Evan is correct. The extra semicolon is pointless. –  DampeS8N Nov 30 '10 at 15:41
    
Correct, absolutely nothing is happening where the two semicolons are. –  BoltClock Nov 30 '10 at 15:41
    
+1 so fast and right ;) –  SubniC Nov 30 '10 at 15:44
1  
Its just like ;;. –  KingCrunch Nov 30 '10 at 15:49

These are unnecessary. They don't hurt the script, just unnecessary. The programmer probably had a habit of adding semicolons to end of every statement. Maybe he got this habit from another programming language, maybe his IDE was showing errors without semicolons or maybe he is just a beginner. In any event, there neither hurt nor help. Also the fact that programmer uses while(1) tells me that he is either extremely lazy, because usually a programmer would write while(true), the only reason to type while 1 is because it's less typing to do. A programmer with any type of formal training will not not write while(1) instead of while(true). This is just my opinion, but it's based on over 10 years of programming in 3 languages.

share|improve this answer
    
+1 I agree with most of your answer. I have less experience but i see normal the while(1) it is not more dificult to understand than while(true). The thing i will point out is the "++$i;" why not "$output = $output." ".$words[++$i];" and you use one less line. –  SubniC Nov 30 '10 at 16:08
    
a common reason why someone would write while(1) is if they are originally a c developer :-P. –  Evan Teran Nov 30 '10 at 18:10
    
Also, a reason why not to write $words[++$i] is because it is easier to mess up. For example, what you write is incorrect, it should be: $words[$i++]. the difference being that the later uses the original $i as the index and your version uses the new $i. –  Evan Teran Nov 30 '10 at 22:12
1  
I am amused at the suggestion that anything remotely resembling rigor exists among PHP developers, such that the choice of while(1) over while(true), especially in code which looks to have been pretty directly transliterated from C, may reliably be taken to indicate laziness -- I mean, how would you tell? –  Aaron Miller May 24 '13 at 20:00

Some people use //endwhile or //endif to signal where it came from. Others put semi-colons after the braces. Both techniques are harmless and just comes down to the developer.

I'd hazard a guess that this programmer doesn't trust their own coding, also is coding in a text-book way without style - the brace positions, the inconsistent spacing, and the while(1) is just ... recommend not doing that.

share|improve this answer
    
hi @Mark Mayo, I understand the use of //endwhile or //endif because it tell you where the sentence finish, but the ; is just like put nothing i mean is no semantics on there. –  SubniC Nov 30 '10 at 16:09
    
in that case it's possibly just that they have a mentality of having to end programming statements with a semi-colon, so they finish everything with one. It does nothing - indeed you could have ;;;;;;; on the end of one of your statements, to no effect. Semi-colons simply separate statements (as do curly brace pairs), so all you'll have is a set of empty statements, which are then optimized out by the compiler at compile time. –  Mark Mayo Nov 30 '10 at 16:12
    
Curly brackets are not like in C? they declare scopes. –  SubniC Nov 30 '10 at 16:16

In some cases you need to have a semicolon after a closing curly bracket!

Example:

if(1==1):
    if(true){ echo "it's true"; } //no semicolon here => syntax error!
else:
    echo "no never ever";
endif;

Of course you would't use alternative syntax for control structures if there is only php code.

But if you have a mix of HTML and PHP code you could use the alternative syntax for control structures (alternate syntax makes the code only clearer and easyer to read), but the problem then is that in some cases a plugin or for example a tag parser of a cms could produce an if statement with curly brackets (without a "closing semicolon") just before the "else:" and this would lead to a syntax error in the resulting php file.

The above code would work like this:

if(1==1):
    if(true){ echo "it's true"; }; 
else:
    echo "no never ever";
endif;
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.