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I'm writing a class which serves as base class for a series of singleton objects. In each singleton objects, there will be vals representing certain properties, and I want to write a method which, for each singleton object, only accepts objects created by it.

So I have the following:

class Obj[M <: Maker]

class Maker {
  implicit val me: this.type = this
  def make[M <: Maker](implicit maker: M) = new Obj[M]
  def accept(obj: Obj[this.type]) = {...}
}

So far, so good. Then I want to declare one of these singleton objects:

object M extends Maker {
  val a = make
}

But then, if I try this:

M.accept(M.a)

then I get a compile-time error:

type mismatch; found : com.test.Obj[object com.test.M] required: com.test.Obj[com.test.M.type]

My questions:

  1. What's the type object com.test.M, and how is it different from com.test.M.type?
  2. How can I do this in a smarter way?
share|improve this question
    
for point 2: there's always the possibility to make Obj a nested class of Maker and to remove the type parameter, but I don't want that, since I need to pass around Obj instances to objects outside the classes in my example and I need to filter on the type parameter. –  Jean-Philippe Pellet Nov 30 '10 at 16:06
1  
Could you please provide a compilable example? Something I can copy&paste into a REPL? –  Daniel C. Sobral Nov 30 '10 at 18:59
    
Great question: I ran into the same problem when implementing a HList and the type of HNil was inferred as object HNil and not HNil.type. Upgraded to 2.9 nightly build and all is fine now. –  raichoo Mar 5 '11 at 13:43
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4 Answers

up vote 6 down vote accepted

Get with the times, my good man! I fixed this over 24 hours ago. Next I expect to see velociraptors chasing dodos, furiously cracking their buggy whips while looking up stock quotes on their pointcast screensavers.

The commit in question is: http://lampsvn.epfl.ch/trac/scala/changeset/23622

// 1130.scala
class Obj[M <: Maker]

class Maker {
  implicit val me: this.type = this
  def make[M <: Maker](implicit maker: M) = new Obj[M]
  def accept(obj: Obj[this.type]) = ()
}

object M extends Maker {
  val a = make
}

object Test {
  def main(args: Array[String]): Unit = {
    M.accept(M.a)
  }
}

// too old
% /scala/inst/scala-2.9.0.r23619/bin/scalac ./1130.scala 
./1130.scala:15: error: type mismatch;
 found   : Obj[object M]
 required: Obj[M.type]
    M.accept(M.a)
               ^
one error found

// fresh enough
% /scala/inst/scala-2.9.0.r23624/bin/scalac ./1130.scala 
%
share|improve this answer
    
Nice! So I assume it was definitely a compiler bug rather than a problem with my mental representation of the types in play. –  Jean-Philippe Pellet Dec 1 '10 at 7:11
    
Well, nobody said it was a bug. It was an undesirable behavior, but it was as specified. –  extempore Dec 1 '10 at 8:03
    
Fair enough, but in this case, can you explain to me the difference between type object M and type M.type? –  Jean-Philippe Pellet Dec 1 '10 at 9:30
    
Not in a way that will make much sense outside of the implementation. As of r23624 I don't know where you're even going to encounter "object M" anymore: it's not a type you can express, so if it's not inferred then it has become the type behind the curtain. –  extempore Dec 1 '10 at 9:46
    
Fine, I'm happy with that. –  Jean-Philippe Pellet Dec 1 '10 at 10:42
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Use this.type instead of M. This simplified example should work:

class Obj[M <: Maker]

class Maker {
  def make() = new Obj[this.type]
  def accept(obj: Obj[this.type]) = println(obj)
}

object M extends Maker

object N extends Maker

M.accept(M.make()) //works!
M.accept(N.make()) //error! type mismatch!
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, this works fine. But why doesn't my example work, what's wrong with my reasoning? What's exactly the difference between object com.text.M and com.text.M.type? –  Jean-Philippe Pellet Nov 30 '10 at 23:21
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This works:

class Obj[M <: Maker]

class Maker {
  implicit val me: this.type = this
  def make[M <: Maker](implicit maker: M) = new Obj[M]
  def accept(obj: Obj[this.type]) = ()
}

object M extends Maker {
  val a = make[M.type]
}

M.accept(M.a)

The secret "sauce" is using make[M.type] inside the singleton object.

@retronym deserves the credit for explaining this: How to correctly type-annotate this HList?

share|improve this answer
    
The implicit is redundant here: it will only ever force M to be this.type ... in which case we might as well use this.type directly, getting us Michel Krämer's solution. –  Miles Sabin Nov 30 '10 at 22:25
    
Actually I'm trying hard to avoid the explicit [M.type] when calling make from M... –  Jean-Philippe Pellet Nov 30 '10 at 23:22
    
@Miles: I just assumed that he has trivialized his real case for the post but that in actual code he requires it –  IttayD Dec 1 '10 at 4:33
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Your first question, "What's the type object com.test.M, and how is it different from com.test.M.type?", still hasn't been answered. I haven't found it documented in the spec, but it seems that the object M type is the internal type representing the class that is implicitly created when you define an object M. Of course, M is the only instance of that class so one would expect the object M type to be equivalent to M.type, but the compiler apparently does not see it that way.

The problem you're running into, as @retronym explained, is that the singleton type M.type is not inferred for the type parameter when you invoke your make method. This is for the same reason that String is inferred rather than v.type in the session below:

scala> val v = "asdf"                      
v: java.lang.String = asdf

scala> identity(v)
res0: java.lang.String  = asdf

where identity is defined as

def identity[T](v: T) = v
share|improve this answer
    
Makes sense. But it looks like extempore fixed this behavior in 2.9, so either object M is really M.type and there was a bug, or the type inference has slightly changed. –  Jean-Philippe Pellet Dec 1 '10 at 7:16
    
What also puzzled me if that when you write val v = "string", v as type String, and when you write val singleton = M, then singleton has type M.type and not object M, so I expected my initial example to work. Glad it will in 2.9 –  Jean-Philippe Pellet Dec 1 '10 at 7:17
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