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I was surprised to find today that I couldn't track down any simple way to write the contents of an InputStream to an OutputStream in Java. Obviously, the byte buffer code isn't difficult to write, but I suspect I'm just missing something which would make my life easier (and the code clearer).

So, given an InputStream in and an OutputStream out, is there a simpler way to write the following?

byte[] buffer = new byte[1024];
int len = in.read(buffer);
while (len != -1) {
    out.write(buffer, 0, len);
    len = in.read(buffer);
}
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12 Answers 12

up vote 168 down vote accepted

As WMR mentioned, org.apache.commons.io.IOUtils from Apache has a method called copy(InputStream,OutputStream) which does exactly what you're looking for.

So, you have:

InputStream in;
OutputStream out;
IOUtils.copy(in,out);

...in your code.

Is there a reason you're avoiding IOUtils?

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34  
I'm avoiding it for this mobile app I'm building cause it'd quintuple the size of the app to save a measly 5 lines of code. –  fiXedd Aug 29 '13 at 15:42
12  
it's maybe worth to mention that in and out must be closed at the end of the code in a finally block –  basZero Oct 4 '13 at 9:51
2  
@basZero Or using a try with resources block. –  Warren Dew May 17 at 6:31
    
Or you could just write your own copy(in, out) wrapper ... (in less time to takes to ...) –  Michael.M Jun 23 at 7:48
    
it was removed ?? –  Eduardo Dennis Jul 7 at 18:56

If you are using Java7, Files is the best one (No extra library require):

/* You can get Path from file also: file.toPath() */
Files.copy(InputStream in, Path target)
Files.copy(Path source, OutputStream out)

EDIT: Of course it's just usefull when you create one of InputStream or OutputStream from file. Use file.toPath() to get path from file.

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1  
I don't think this actually solves the problem since one end is a path. While you can get a path for a file, as far as I am aware you can't get one for any generic stream (e.g. one over the network). –  Matt Sheppard Oct 7 '13 at 13:15
    
+1 still turned out to be useful in my case though, as I have a real file on the output side! –  Erik Allik Apr 9 at 0:29
    
As far as I'm concerned, te first method you say is not available with that signature. You have to add the CopyOptions parameter. –  Xtreme Biker Jul 5 at 13:11
1  
CopyOptions is arbitrary! You can put it here if you want it. –  user1079877 Jul 7 at 2:15

I think this will work, but make sure to test it... minor "improvement", but it might be a bit of a cost at readability.

byte[] buffer = new byte[1024];
int len;
while ((len = in.read(buffer)) != -1) {
    out.write(buffer, 0, len);
}
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8  
I suggest a buffer of at least 10KB to 100KB. That's not much and can speed up copying large amounts of data tremendously. –  Aaron Digulla Dec 13 '08 at 9:24
    
This did the trick for me when writing a file. I did not realize I needed to get the actual length readd from the input stream and use that to output to a file. –  Kevin Sep 9 '11 at 18:28

There's no way to do this a lot easier with JDK methods, but as Apocalisp has already noted, you're not the only one with this idea: You could use IOUtils from Jakarta Commons IO, it also has a lot of other useful things, that IMO should actually be part of the JDK...

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PipedInputStream and PipedOutputStream should only be used when you have multiple threads, as noted by the javadoc.

Also note that input streams and output streams do not wrap any thread interruptions with IOExceptions... So you should consider incorporating an interruption policy to your code:

byte[] buffer = new byte[1024];
int len = in.read(buffer);
while (len != -1) {
    out.write(buffer, 0, len);
    len = in.read(buffer);
    if (Thread.interrupted()) {
        throw new InterruptedException();
    }
}

This would be an useful addition if you expect to use this API for copying large volumes of data, or data from streams that get stuck for an intolerably long time.

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If you only need this for say writing an inputstream to a file you can use this

private void copy(InputStream in, File file) {
    try {
        OutputStream out = new FileOutputStream(file);
        byte[] buf = new byte[1024];
        int len;
        while((len=in.read(buf))>0){
            out.write(buf,0,len);
        }
        out.close();
        in.close();
    } catch (Exception e) {
        e.printStackTrace();
    }
}
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Using Guava library:

ByteStreams.copy(inputStream, outputStream);
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Another possible candidate are the Guava I/O utilities:

http://code.google.com/p/guava-libraries/wiki/IOExplained

I thought I'd use these since Guava is already immensely useful in my project, rather than adding yet another library for one function.

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There are copy and toByteArray methods in docs.guava-libraries.googlecode.com/git-history/release/javadoc/… (guava calls input/output streams as "byte streams" and readers/writers as "char streams") –  Raekye Aug 6 '13 at 16:21

I think it's better to use a large buffer, because most of the files are greater than 1024 bytes. Also it's a good practice to check the number of read bytes to be positive.

byte[] buffer = new byte[4096];
int n;
while ((n = in.read(buffer)) > 0) {
    out.write(buffer, 0, n);
}
out.close();
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1  
Using a large buffer is indeed a good idea but not because files are mostly > 1k, it is to amortize the cost of system calls. –  EJP Oct 30 '13 at 8:06

Use Commons Net's Util class:

import org.apache.commons.net.io.Util;
...
Util.copyStream(in, out);
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PipedInputStream and PipedOutputStream may be of some use, as you can connect one to the other.

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This is not good for single-threaded code as it could deadlock; see this question stackoverflow.com/questions/484119/… –  Raekye Aug 6 '13 at 16:20
1  
May be of some use how? He already has an input stream and an output stream. How will adding another one of each help exactly? –  EJP Oct 30 '13 at 8:05

you can use this method

public static void copyStream(InputStream is, OutputStream os)
 {
     final int buffer_size=1024;
     try
     {
         byte[] bytes=new byte[buffer_size];
         for(;;)
         {
           int count=is.read(bytes, 0, buffer_size);
           if(count==-1)
               break;
           os.write(bytes, 0, count);
         }
     }
     catch(Exception ex){}
 }
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