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I have a method named 'PersonsMeeting' that gets as parameter ObservableCollection of Person. Can I somehow deliver it an ObservableCollection of Employee ? what casting do I need ?

p.s - I don't want to get rid of the ObservableCollection type in the method since I'm using it's functionality.

public partial class MainWindow : Window
{
    public ObservableCollection<Employee> Emp { get; set; }

    public MainWindow()
    {
        Emp = new ObservableCollection<Employee>();

        InitializeComponent();
        PersonsMeeting(Emp); // How Do I Cast this ?!?!?!??
    }

    private void PersonsMeeting(ObservableCollection<Person> persons)
    {
        // ....
    }
}

public class Person{}
public class Employee : Person{}
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if you do not need functionality of ObservableCollection<T> in your PersonsMeeting function, maybe you could use a more generic interface for your prototype like IList<Person> or even IEnumerable<Person>. –  Joachim Kerschbaumer Nov 30 '10 at 16:05
    
@Joachim Kerschbaumer - unfortunately I do need it. –  Erez Nov 30 '10 at 16:21

4 Answers 4

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Since you already know that every Employee is a Person, you can simply use Enumerable.Cast to cast the elements to the type needed:

PersonsMeeting(Emp.Cast());

PersonsMeeting(new ObservableCollection<Person>(Emp.Cast<Person>()));

But this will most likely not produce the results you expect since you're really creating a new ObservableCollection rather than utilizing the existing one.

Update 2

I notice that the PersonsMeeting method is private and that you're only ever calling it with an ObservableCollection<Employee>.

If that's the case, then you're trying to use an unnecessary abstraction in your private method. You can safely get rid of that and simply modify PersonsMeeting to take an ObservableCollection<Employee>.

The other option is to change the way your class is exposing its data. If you want to keep the abstraction, make your class look like:

public partial class MainWindow : Window
{
    private ReadOnlyObservableCollection<Person> _readOnlyEmp = null;
    private ObservableCollection<Person> _emp = new ObservableCollection<Person>;

    public ReadOnlyObservableCollection<Person> Emp
    {
        if(_readOnlyEmp = null)
            _readOnlyEmp = new ReadOnlyObservableCollection<Person>(_emp);

        return _readOnlyEmp;
    }

    public void AddEmployee(Employee e)
    {
        _emp.Add(e);
    }

    public void RemoveEmployee(Employee e)
    { 
        _emp.Remove(e);
    }
}
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thanks but after doing what you've suggested I'm getting compilation errors: The best overloaded method match for 'WpfApplication1.MainWindow.PersonsMeeting(System.Collections.ObjectModel.Observ‌​ableCollection<WpfApplication1.Person>)' has some invalid arguments ---------- cannot convert from 'System.Collections.Generic.IEnumerable<WpfApplication1.Person>' to 'System.Collections.ObjectModel.ObservableCollection<WpfApplication1.Person>' –  Erez Nov 30 '10 at 16:24
    
@Erez - Correct. That's a mistake on my part reading your code. What portion of the ObservableCollection functionality do you need inside of PersonsMeeting? –  Justin Niessner Nov 30 '10 at 16:29
    
I need the collection to notify that it changed (items been remvoed/add). –  Erez Nov 30 '10 at 16:31
    
@Erez - I just posted a bunch of updates...hopefully something makes sense. –  Justin Niessner Nov 30 '10 at 16:49
PersonsMeeting(Emp.OfType<Person>);

or

PersonsMeeting(Emp.Cast<Person>);
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thanks but not passing compilation , see my comments to Justin Niessner –  Erez Nov 30 '10 at 16:35
    
if PersonsMeeting takes an ObservableCollection as parameter, using any of your methods will fail as you wont have an ObservableCollection after calling OfType<Person> or Cast<Person> –  furier Dec 19 '13 at 13:53

Considering that the class should be ObservableCollection, try this:

class Program
{
    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        var employees = new ObservableCollection<Employee>();
        var persons = employees.OfType<Person>();

        Test(new ObservableCollection<Person>(persons));
    }

    static void Test(ObservableCollection<Person> persons)
    {
        // Do something
    }
}

public class Person { }
public class Employee : Person { }
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1  
Only in .Net 4 though :) –  cwap Nov 30 '10 at 16:09
    
+1 for suggestion, thanks cwap. –  as-cii Nov 30 '10 at 16:11
    
In addition, there are certain behaviors of classes that could break generic covariance/contravariance even in .NET 4.0 (it's tricky). –  Justin Niessner Nov 30 '10 at 16:20
    
Cant do that, I need it as ObservableCollection –  Erez Nov 30 '10 at 16:24
    
Modified answer. –  as-cii Nov 30 '10 at 16:35

If you don't mind generics:

private void PersonsMeeting<T>(ObservableCollection<T> persons) where T: Person
{
    // ....
}
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