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Microsoft SQL Server seems to check column name validity, but not table name validity when defining stored procedures. If it detects that a referenced table name exists currently, it validates the column names in a statement against the columns in that table. So, for example, this will run OK:

CREATE PROCEDURE [dbo].[MyProcedure]
AS
BEGIN
    SELECT
        Col1, Col2, Col3
    FROM
        NonExistentTable
END
GO

... as will this:

CREATE PROCEDURE [dbo].[MyProcedure]
AS
BEGIN
    SELECT
        ExistentCol1, ExistentCol2, ExistentCol3
    FROM
        ExistentTable
END
GO

... but this fails, with 'Invalid column name':

CREATE PROCEDURE [dbo].[MyProcedure]
AS
BEGIN
    SELECT
        NonExistentCol1, NonExistentCol2, NonExistentCol3
    FROM
        ExistentTable
END
GO

Why does SQL Server check columns, but not tables, for existence? Surely it's inconsistent; it should do both, or neither. It's useful for us to be able to define SPs which may refer to tables AND/OR columns which don't exist in the schema yet, so is there a way to turn off SQL Server's checking of column existence in tables which currently exist?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 5 down vote accepted

This is called deferred name resolution.

There is no way of turning it off. You can use dynamic SQL or (a nasty hack!) add a reference to a non existent table so that compilation of that statement is deferred.

CREATE PROCEDURE [dbo].[MyProcedure]
AS
BEGIN

CREATE TABLE #Dummy (c int)

    SELECT
        NonExistantCol1, NonExistantCol2, NonExistantCol3
    FROM
        ExistantTable 
    WHERE NOT EXISTS(SELECT * FROM #Dummy)    


DROP TABLE #Dummy

END
GO
share|improve this answer
    
Which is; the non-checking of tables, or the checking of columns? –  Jez Nov 30 '10 at 16:17
    
The non checking of tables. If all tables used in a statement exist then it is not deferred. –  Martin Smith Nov 30 '10 at 16:30
    
Thanks for the explanation; why did you need to DROP TABLE #Dummy? Aren't temp tables auto-dropped once the stored proc finishes? –  Jez Nov 30 '10 at 16:47
    
@Jez - Yes they are. Just habit! –  Martin Smith Nov 30 '10 at 16:48
    
And for that matter, why create the Dummy table at all? –  Jez Nov 30 '10 at 16:48

This article in MSDN should answer your question.

share|improve this answer
    
OK, that answers the 'how' but not the 'why'... as in, what is MS's justification for doing this? It would be more useful if they did deferred name resolution on column names too (or that option were available). –  Jez Nov 30 '10 at 16:24
    
Well SQL Server is taking validation as far as it can, right? If the table exists, check its columns. Otherwise, if the table doesn't exist yet, there's no way to check it's columns. –  bitxwise Nov 30 '10 at 16:28
    
No... SQL Server could say, 'error. table does not exist.' It doesn't have to allow deferred name resolution at all. On the other hand, it could realize that a column doesn't yet exist but defer resolution on it because you might go on to change the schema later. Deferring table name resolution but not column name resolution just seems irritatingly inconsistent. –  Jez Nov 30 '10 at 16:30
2  
@Jez - You can get consistent behaviour by using WITH SCHEMABINDING this makes it consistent in the stricter direction though. –  Martin Smith Nov 30 '10 at 16:32
    
Yeah...it'd be nice to have the option, but as Martin said, we're SOL. Microsoft has said they'd consider putting the feature (or misfeature for that matter) up for requirements discussion since SQL Server 2000...progress...? =T –  bitxwise Nov 30 '10 at 16:41

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