Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Is this code correct? It runs as expected, but is this code correctly using the pointers and dot notation for the struct?

struct someStruct {
 unsigned int total;
};

int test(struct someStruct* state) {
 state->total = 4;
}

int main () {
 struct someStruct s;
 s.total = 5;
 test(&s);
 printf("\ns.total = %d\n", s.total);
}
share|improve this question
    
why is test supposed to return an int ? actually there is not return there. –  GeorgeAl Nov 30 '10 at 16:59
    
C does have references? Suprised ... –  Benjamin Bannier Nov 30 '10 at 17:01
1  
@honk: not in the C++ sense, but before C++ was invented, pointers were a kind of "reference" (because they have a "referand"). Now they have a "pointee" or some such nonsense. Since someStruct has value semantics, "pass-by-reference" (which C doesn't do in C++ terms) is exactly the same thing as "passing a reference by value" (which it does, the "reference" in question being a pointer). –  Steve Jessop Nov 30 '10 at 17:41
    
c++ references (declared with the ampersand token) are superior in that: 1) It is less likely to write a bug with a c++ reference, and 2) code written with c++ references is more likely to enable the compiler to make aliasing optimizations. Since aliasing is impossible in fortran, unoptimized pointer routines in c can cause embarassment. –  mda Nov 10 '12 at 22:19

4 Answers 4

That's correct usage of the struct. There are questions about your return values.

Also, because you are printfing a unsigned int, you should use %u instead of %d.

share|improve this answer

Your use of pointer and dot notation is good. The compiler should give you errors and/or warnings if there was a problem.

Here is a copy of your code with some additional notes and things to think about so far as the use of structs and pointers and functions and scope of variables.

struct someStruct {
 unsigned int total;
};

int test(struct someStruct* state) {
 state->total = 4;    // modifies the struct that exists in the calling function
 return 0;
}

int test2(struct someStruct state) {
 state.total = 8;     // modifies the local copy of the struct, the original in the calling function is not modified.
  return 0;
}

int test3 (struct someStruct *state) {
    struct someStruct  stateCopy;
    stateCopy = *state;    // make a local copy of the struct
    stateCopy.total = 12;  // modify the local copy of the struct
    *state = stateCopy;    // copy the local copy back to the original in the calling function.
    return 0;
}

int main () {
 struct someStruct s;

 // set the value then call a function that will change the value
 s.total = 5;
 test(&s);
 printf("\nafter test(): s.total = %d\n", s.total);

 // set the value then call a function that will change its local copy but not this one
 s.total = 5;
 test2(s);
 printf("\nafter test2(): s.total = %d\n", s.total);

 // call a function that will make a copy, change the copy, then put the copy into this one
 test3(&s);
 printf("\nafter test3(): s.total = %d\n", s.total);
 return 0;
}
share|improve this answer

Yes, that's right. It makes a struct s, sets its total to 5, passes a pointer to it to a function that uses the pointer to set the total to 4, then prints it out. -> is for members of pointers to structs and . is for members of structs. Just like you used them.

The return values are different though. test should probably be void, and main needs a return 0 at its end.

share|improve this answer

Yep. It's correct. If it wasn't (from the . / -> point of view), your compiler would yell.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.