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Please what wrong in this code:

#include <iostream>
#include <vector>


unsigned __int32 ConvertToChars(std::vector<int> container, char** pChars)
{
    *pChars = (char*)&container[0];

    return container.size() * sizeof(int);
}


void ConvertToIntegers(char* chars, short size, std::vector<int>& container)
{
    int count = size / sizeof(int);

    int* pIntegers = (int*)chars;

    for(int i=0; i < count; ++i)
    {
        container.push_back(*(pIntegers++));
    }
}


void Print(const std::vector<int>& container)
{
    for(int i=0; i < container.size(); ++i)
    {
        std::cout << container[i] << std::endl;
    }
}


void main()
{
    std::vector<int> vec1;

    vec1.push_back(1);
    vec1.push_back(2);
    vec1.push_back(3);

    char* buffer = 0;

    short bufferSize = ConvertToChars(vec1, &buffer);

    std::vector<int> vec2;

    ConvertToIntegers(buffer, bufferSize, vec2);

    Print(vec2);

    char c;

    std::cin >> c;
}

function Print prints values:

  • -572662307
  • -842150451
  • -572662307

Thank you!!!

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2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

You're copying the container when you pass it to ConvertToChars, then taking a pointer to one of its elements, then seeing the copy go out of scope, which invalidates your pointer.

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oh! i spent an hour to find it!!! @sgolodetz you are brilliant! thank you!!! –  vinctr Nov 30 '10 at 17:25
    
@vinctr make sure to accept his answer if he got it right. –  Jimmy Nov 30 '10 at 17:29
    
@Jimmy yes! it seems like i cannot accept it quickly) 1 minute) –  vinctr Nov 30 '10 at 17:33

I don't really understand the point of your program, but part of your problem is in your ConvertToIntegers function, where you make your program interpret a char * as int *.

int* pIntegers = (int*)chars;

for(int i=0; i < count; ++i)
{
    container.push_back(*(pIntegers++));
}

You're interpreting the underlying bytes as int types, which could lead to the numbers you're seeing. I'm surprised you're not running into segmentation faults as this would cause you to overstep the block of the memory pointed to by the original char *.

share|improve this answer
    
thank you for answer! –  vinctr Nov 30 '10 at 17:26

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