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My problem is best outlined with this schematic/image which outlines how I want it to look:

http://i51.tinypic.com/28thuh0.jpg!

I have a background image and 2 divs for text over the top of it (headline, and intro-text). I also have 2 divs on either side of the headline - these are for the white horizontal stripes.

My issue is that the headline is changeable in a CMS, and I want the horizontal white stripes to automatically fill up the space to the left and to the right of it, regardless of the headline's width.

I can't figure out how to make those 2 horizontal white stripes resize automatically.

Here's my HTML:

<div id="masthead">
<div id="headline-container">   
    <div id="left-stripe">&nbsp;</div><div id="headline">{headline}</div><div id="right-stripe">&nbsp;</div>
</div>
<div class="clear-both">&nbsp;</div>
<div id="intro-text">{intro_text}</div>
</div>

And here's my CSS - ignore the widths specified for the left-stripe and right-stripe - they're just placeholders:

#masthead {
    height: 260px;
}

div#headline-container {
    width:960px;
    padding:none;
}
div#left-stripe{
    float: left;
    background-color:#fff;
    height: 3px;
    width:500px;
    display: inline;
}
div#right-stripe{
    float: right;
    background-color:#fff;
    height: 3px;
    width:100px;
    display: inline;
}
div#headline {
    text-align:right;
    color: #fff;
    font-size: 200%;
    float: left;
    display: inline;    
}
div#intro-text {
    text-align: left;
    float: right;
    width: 300px;
    color: #fff;
}

Ideas? Please let me know if I can provide more detail.

share|improve this question
    
Your question is a bit vague. For stuff like this it's good to find a live example and not just a screen –  Derek Adair Nov 30 '10 at 17:43
    
Maybe a rewording of my actual question then: How do I make the 2 white stripes fill up any remaining space to the left and the right of the headline div, regardless of the headline text's width (which will change). –  k00k Nov 30 '10 at 17:45
    
(change the actual question) =P –  Derek Adair Nov 30 '10 at 17:56

3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

I'm a bit too busy to actually test this, but this might give you some direction. i'm not sure the exact effect you're trying to achieve (see comment about finding a live demo someone made).

Regardless, this kind of fluid layout is a bit difficult to achieve reliably with straight CSS. To make it easier I would suggest making the right-stripe a static width.

This CSS solution MIGHT work... no promises.

markup

<div class="container">
  <div class="headline-container">
   <div class="left-stripe"></div>
   <div class="headline">Headline goes here</div>
   <div class="right-stripe></div>
  </div>
  <div class="content"></div>
</div>

CSS

//static width for right stripe
.right-stripe { width: 20px; }
.headline { width: auto; }
.left-stripe { width: auto; }

Using javascript would make it really easy though... here's how i would do it with jQuery. Again, I would make the right-stripe a static width to achieve this effect.

(same markup...)

..

js

var totalWidth = $("#container").width();
var leftWidth = totalWidth - ($("headline").width() + $("right-stripe").width());
$("left-stripe").width(leftWidth);
share|improve this answer
    
Tried the CSS-only one, no go. I started that way. I've decided to use the jQuery method after-all. I think it's the simplest and allows me to move on, amen! –  k00k Nov 30 '10 at 18:20
    
yea... sometimes css just can't get the job done. Although, with CSS 3/html5 i think it could be done if you wanted to put the time... but it'd be a wasteland in x-browser-land –  Derek Adair Nov 30 '10 at 21:19

You can do this dynamically, with jQuery, for example. You take the full width of the 3 div's, drop the size of the inner div and assign dynamically the widths of the 2 outer div's in which the bar should repeat horizontally.

Basically, you will need: $("#whole-div").width() - $("#inner-div").width() for the outer div's total width. Then, depending on your positioning of the inner-div, you assign values for the outer div's. For example: whole div has 1000px, inner div has 200px and inner div is positioned 600px left. You will then assign 600px to the left div ($("#whole-div").width() - $("#inner-div").css('left')) and 200px for the right div ($("#whole-div").width() - $("#inner-div").css('left') - $("#inner-div").width()). Of course, you will then set a background-repeat property on the outer div so that the image repeats.

Hope that helps!

share|improve this answer

UPDATE CSS only fluid solution: http://jsfiddle.net/SebastianPataneMasuelli/XnvYw/1/

it uses the same background image twice, on #masthead and on #headline-container. except ton headline container the background is offset to match its left position relative to its parent element. then we only need one div.line behind it, which gets covered by the background image under the headline and copy, giving the illusion of a seamless image.

do you mean like this?: http://jsfiddle.net/SebastianPataneMasuelli/XnvYw/

share|improve this answer
    
I believe he is looking for a way to do this "fluidly" –  Derek Adair Nov 30 '10 at 17:54
    
Indeed, "fluidly" is the key. –  k00k Nov 30 '10 at 18:03
    
check the updated answer, please. –  Sebastian Patane Masuelli Nov 30 '10 at 18:06
    
@Sebastian That doesn't quite do what I need. If you change the headline to something longer or shorter, you have problems. See this update: jsfiddle.net/XnvYw/8 –  k00k Nov 30 '10 at 18:10
    
Of course, if oyu have a headline that goes over the edge of the parent container, and its all oneword ussing camelcase, and it stretches the line, it will look weird, but if you simply put a space in your headline, it will fold under and work. –  Sebastian Patane Masuelli Nov 30 '10 at 18:18

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