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gcc 4.5.1 c89

I have written this source code for my better understanding of malloc and calloc.

I understand, but just have a few questions.

dev = malloc(number * sizeof *devices);

is equal to this calloc. I am not concerned about clearing the memory.

dev = calloc(number, sizeof *devices);

What is that exactly, compared to doing this 5 times in a while loop:

dev = malloc(sizeof *devices);

I guess the first one and the second is creating a pointer to 5 struct device. And the third is creating a single pointer to a struct device?

My program illustrates this 3 different methods compiled and ran with valgrind --leak-check=full.

Many thanks for any advice.

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>

struct Devices {
#define MAX_NAME_SIZE 80
    size_t id;
    char name[MAX_NAME_SIZE];
};

struct Devices* create_device(struct Devices *dev);
void destroy_device(struct Devices *dev);

int main(void)
{
    size_t num_devices = 5;
    size_t i = 0;
    struct Devices *device = NULL;
    struct Devices *dev_malloc = NULL;
    struct Devices *dev_calloc = NULL;

    for(i = 0; i < num_devices; i++) {
        device = create_device(device);
        /* Assign values */
        device->id = i + 1;
        sprintf(device->name, "Device%zu", device->id);
        /* Print values */
        printf("ID ----- [ %zu ]\n", device->id);
        printf("Name --- [ %s ]\n", device->name);
        /* Test free */
        destroy_device(device);
    }

    printf("\n");
    dev_malloc = malloc(num_devices * sizeof *dev_malloc);
    for(i = 0; i < num_devices; i++) {
        /* Assign values */
        dev_malloc->id = i + 1;
        sprintf(dev_malloc->name, "dev_malloc%zu", dev_malloc->id);
        /* Print values */
        printf("ID ----- [ %zu ]\n", dev_malloc->id);
        printf("Name --- [ %s ]\n", dev_malloc->name);
    }
    /* Test free */
    destroy_device(dev_malloc);

    printf("\n");
    dev_calloc = calloc(num_devices, sizeof *dev_calloc);
    for(i = 0; i < num_devices; i++) {
        /* Assign values */
        dev_calloc->id = i + 1;
        sprintf(dev_calloc->name, "dev_calloc%zu", dev_calloc->id);
        /* Print values */
        printf("ID ----- [ %zu ]\n", dev_calloc->id);
        printf("Name --- [ %s ]\n", dev_calloc->name);
    }
    /* Test free */
    destroy_device(dev_calloc);

    return 0;
}

struct Devices* create_device(struct Devices *dev)
{
    /* Not checking for memory error - just simple test */
    return dev = malloc(sizeof *dev);
}

void destroy_device(struct Devices *dev)
{
    if(dev != NULL) {
        free(dev);
    }
}
share|improve this question
    
You don't use calloc in your code sample. Is this deliberate? –  Charles Bailey Nov 30 '10 at 17:45
    
Sorry, that was a mistake. I have now corrected and tested the code. It now uses calloc. I did a quick copy and paste and forgot to change it. –  ant2009 Nov 30 '10 at 18:02

7 Answers 7

up vote 2 down vote accepted

edited for clarity

  • I guess the first one and the second is creating a pointer to 5 struct device. And the third is creating a single pointer to a struct device?

The first one malloc(number * sizeof(*devices)) would allocate enough memory to store number of Devices. As others have mentioned, you can treat this block like an array of Device. The pointer you get back will point to the beginning of the block.

int number = 5;
Device *ptr = malloc(number * sizeof(*ptr));
/* stuff */
free(ptr);

The second one that uses calloc does the same thing, while also initializing the memory to 0. Again, you can use treat the block like an array of Device.

int number = 5;
Device *ptr = calloc(number, sizeof(*ptr));
/* stuff */
free(ptr);

The third one, looping 5 times, would result in 5 different pointers to 5 different blocks large enough to store one Device each. This also means each of the 5 pointers has to be free'ed individually.

Device *ptrs[5];
for(int i = 0; i < 5; ++i)
{
    ptrs[i] = malloc(sizeof(*ptrs[i]));
}
/* stuff */
for(int i = 0; i < 5; ++i)
{
    free(ptrs[i]);
}
share|improve this answer
    
@birryee, reference to aix's answer. The malloc and calloc allocate enough memory to store 5 struct devices? And only returns a single pointer. That pointer will point to the first struct device in memory. By incrementing that pointer you can point to the second struct device, etc. And one call to free by passing that pointer will free all memory that the 5 struct devices have been allocated. Thanks. –  ant2009 Nov 30 '10 at 18:14
    
@ant2009 - reference what from aix? –  birryree Nov 30 '10 at 18:15
    
@Birryee, Sorry, Just updated my comment above. –  ant2009 Nov 30 '10 at 18:18
    
@ant2009 - I edited my answer to clarify, but yes, for the case where you malloc (or calloc) a big block at once, you can treat it like an array, and a single free call to the pointer they return will free the allocated block. –  birryree Nov 30 '10 at 18:25

malloc(n) allocates n bytes plus padding and overhead.

calloc(m, n) allocates m*n bytes plus padding and overhead, and then zero's the memory.

That's it.

share|improve this answer
    
Right, except that calloc does not need to explicitly zero if it got fresh pages from the OS (I expect this to be true for most allocations of a page or more, but didn't check GNU libc, only BSD omalloc, in which it is). –  mirabilos Mar 31 '14 at 20:42

calloc(a,b) and malloc(a*b) are equivalent except for the possibility of arithmetic overflow or type issues, and the fact that calloc ensures the memory is zero-byte-filled. Either allocated memory that can be used for an array of a elements each of size b (or vice versa). On the other hand, calling malloc(b) a times will results in a individual objects of size b which can be freed independently and which are not in an array (though you could store their addresses in an array of pointers).

Hope this helps.

share|improve this answer

The first two create an array of 5 devices in contiguous memory. The last malloc, done five times, will create 5 individual devices which are not guaranteed to be in contiguous memory.

share|improve this answer
    
Devices, I took from the project I am currently working on. –  ant2009 Nov 30 '10 at 18:05

All three loops in your program use only one struct Devices object at a time. The later ones allocate extra memory as though they are going to use multiple objects, but then keep overwriting the beginning of that memory. If you tried to use the object with ID 1 after setting up the object with ID 2, you would find there is no longer any object with ID 1.

Instead, you could do something like this to treat the allocated memory as an array of structs:

dev_malloc = malloc(num_devices * sizeof *dev_malloc);
for (i=0; i<num_devices; i++) {
    /* Assign values */   
    dev_malloc[i].id = i + 1;   
    sprintf(dev_malloc[i].name, "dev_malloc%zu", dev_malloc[i].id);   
    /* Print values */   
    printf("ID ----- [ %zu ]\n", dev_malloc[i].id);   
    printf("Name --- [ %s ]\n", dev_malloc[i].name);
}
free(dev_malloc);
share|improve this answer
    
Your correct. I used the arrow operator, but forgot to increment the pointer to the next pointer in the allocated memory block. –  ant2009 Nov 30 '10 at 18:09

Look at an implementation of calloc to see the differences. It's probably something like this:

// SIZE_MAX is defined in stdint.h from C99
void *calloc( size_t N, size_t S)
{
    void *ret;
    size_t NBYTES;

    // check for overflow of size_t type
    if (N > SIZE_MAX / S) return NULL;

    NBYTES = N * S;
    ret = malloc( NBYTES);
    if (ret != NULL)
    {
        memset( ret, 0, NBYTES);
    }

    return ret;
}
share|improve this answer
    
That's an extremely primitive implementation of a calloc not making use of the fact that the result of memory allocation is already zeroed in many cases. (But good for explaining.) –  mirabilos Mar 31 '14 at 20:43
    
@mirabilos, can you cite documentation indicating that memory allocation is zeroed? Do modern OSes zero out memory for security reasons? The C Standard won't guarantee that memory allocated with malloc() is zeroed, so if you need it zeroed you need to call calloc(). The C library may execute the same code path for both malloc() and calloc() on some platforms, so it's much more efficient for your program to call calloc() instead of manually zeroing any memory allocated with malloc(). –  tomlogic Apr 1 '14 at 20:24
    
An implementation of malloc/calloc can use the mmap system call to get anonymous memory from the kernel, which is generally better than the old sbrk method. Memory freshly gotten from the kernel is guaranteed (by POSIX) to be zero'd. –  mirabilos Apr 2 '14 at 15:58

As you point out, calloc zeroes out the memory is allocates, while malloc doesn't.

Your examples 1 & 2 each allocate a single contiguous block of five structs (and returns a pointer to that block), whereas example 3 allocates five separate blocks of one struct each (and gives you five pointers unrelated to one another.)

share|improve this answer
    
OP said this is not what the question is about. –  R.. Nov 30 '10 at 17:45
    
Yeah, accidentally posted a partial response, hence the confusion. –  NPE Nov 30 '10 at 17:51
    
@ax. When you say a contiguous block of 5 pointers. Is it not returning a single pointer to where the 5 struct devices are located in memory? I am not sure that 5 pointers is correct? –  ant2009 Nov 30 '10 at 18:13
    
You're right, I've corrected the answer. –  NPE Nov 30 '10 at 18:16

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