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I'm new to regex and javascript and I was wondering if anyone knew what the regex would be for detecting whether or not a input field contained the following type of format:

  • At least one alphanumeric tag which can contain spaces (e.g "Test Tag" but not "Test@Tag")

  • Each tag seperated by a single comma (e.g "Cars, Vehicle, Large Dog, Bed" but not "Cars,, Vehicle, Tiger)

An example of what I mean is this, these would be valid tags:

boy, man,girl, woman,tyrannosaurus rex, lion

And these would be invalid tags:

hat, cat, rat, c3po, @gmail

Because there are invalid characters in "@gmail".

It should also be able to accept just a single tag, as long as the characters are alphanumeric.

Thanks.

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are you validating the input or trying to extract the tag names from the string? if you're just validating the input, it will be a much simpler regex. –  Brandon Montgomery Nov 30 '10 at 17:48
    
Just validating the input for now, the extracting part will be done later. –  ThunderLegs Nov 30 '10 at 17:51
1  
Are _'s invalid? –  Sean Vieira Nov 30 '10 at 17:55
    
Do you want to allow extra spaces at the beginning or at the end? –  Alin Purcaru Nov 30 '10 at 18:00
    
_'s should be invalid and extra spaces are allowed as that stuff will be filtered server-side. –  ThunderLegs Nov 30 '10 at 18:02

4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Assuming you want to allow _ and not allow whitespace at the beginning or the end this would be the shortest solution:

/^\w(\s*,?\s*\w)*$/

Introducing whitespace at the ends:

/^\s*\w(\s*,?\s*\w)*\s*$/

Removing _ from the allowed characters:

/^\s*[a-z0-9](\s*,?\s*[a-z0-9])*\s*$/

This is the brute-force regex I initially posted. It translates your requirements to regex syntax. I would like to leave it here for reference.

/^\s*([a-z0-9]+(\s[a-z0-9]+)*)(\s*,\s*([a-z0-9]+(\s[a-z0-9]+)*))*\s*$/
share|improve this answer
    
One more thing, if your don't mind, how would I allow just a single space inside a tag and no more? So something like this is vaid "Car, tyrannosaurus rex" but "Car, Tyran nosaurus rex, Bike" is invalid? –  ThunderLegs Nov 30 '10 at 18:27
    
@ThunderLegs None of the solutions you received take into account a situation like that so altering one of them is out of the question. –  Alin Purcaru Nov 30 '10 at 18:44
    
@ThunderLegs I added another answer with a separate regex for allowing at most two words. –  Alin Purcaru Nov 30 '10 at 18:52

Try something like this:

var re = /^(\w+,? ?)+$/;
var str1 = "boy, man,girl, woman,tyrannosaurus rex, lion";
var str2 = "hat, cat, rat, c3po, @gmail";
alert(str1.test(re));  // true
alert(str2.test(re));  // false

Breaking it down... \w matches word characters, \w+ matches 1 or more word characters. ,? ? matches optional comma and space. (Two commas would be rejected.) The ()+ around everything says one or more times. Lastly ^ and $ anchors it to the beginning and end of the string to make sure everything is matched.

share|improve this answer
    
bah,, true, not ,, ok true. It's too permissive. Also I don't know if he wants to allow _. –  Alin Purcaru Nov 30 '10 at 17:57
    
No, both of those evaluate to false. Only 1 comma is allowed with ",?". You are correct that \w allows the underscore character. He could use [a-zA-Z] if he wants to disallow it. Overall he might want to make it more permissive by allowing multiple spaces after the comma or spaces before the comma, but the regexp works as requested. –  James Kovacs Nov 30 '10 at 18:04
    
Thanks, this works well and is the cleanest of all the regex posted. Out of curiosity, how would I allow multiple spaces as you have described? –  ThunderLegs Nov 30 '10 at 18:07
    
When specifying multiplicity... ? allows zero or one. * allows zero or more. + allows one or more. So you could change it to var re = /^(\w+,? *)+$/; –  James Kovacs Nov 30 '10 at 18:09
    
@James I thought you had \w* instead of \w+. There is still the problem that it allows something,. @ThunderLegs See my post for allowing spaces and not allowing _. –  Alin Purcaru Nov 30 '10 at 18:12

Assuming that underscores (_) are not invalid:

/^(\w+\s?[\w\s]*)(,\s*\w+\s?[\w\s]*)*$/

Assert position at the beginning of a line (at beginning of the string or after a line break character) «^»
Match the regular expression below and capture its match into backreference number 1 «(\w+\s?[\w\s]*)»
   Match a single character that is a “word character” (letters, digits, and underscores) «\w+»
      Between one and unlimited times, as many times as possible, giving back as needed (greedy) «+»
   Match a single character that is a “whitespace character” (spaces, tabs, and line breaks) «\s?»
      Between zero and one times, as many times as possible, giving back as needed (greedy) «?»
   Match a single character present in the list below «[\w\s]*»
      Between zero and unlimited times, as many times as possible, giving back as needed (greedy) «*»
      A word character (letters, digits, and underscores) «\w»
      A whitespace character (spaces, tabs, and line breaks) «\s»
Match the regular expression below and capture its match into backreference number 2 «(,\s*\w+\s?[\w\s]*)*»
   Between zero and unlimited times, as many times as possible, giving back as needed (greedy) «*»
   Note: You repeated the capturing group itself.
   The group will capture only the last iteration.
   Put a capturing group around the repeated group to capture all iterations. «*»
   Match the character “,” literally «,»
   Match a single character that is a “whitespace character” (spaces, tabs, and line breaks) «\s*»
      Between zero and unlimited times, as many times as possible, giving back as needed (greedy) «*»
   Match a single character that is a “word character” (letters, digits, and underscores) «\w+»
      Between one and unlimited times, as many times as possible, giving back as needed (greedy) «+»
   Match a single character that is a “whitespace character” (spaces, tabs, and line breaks) «\s?»
      Between zero and one times, as many times as possible, giving back as needed (greedy) «?»
   Match a single character present in the list below «[\w\s]*»
      Between zero and unlimited times, as many times as possible, giving back as needed (greedy) «*»
      A word character (letters, digits, and underscores) «\w»
      A whitespace character (spaces, tabs, and line breaks) «\s»
Assert position at the end of a line (at the end of the string or before a line break character) «$»


Created with RegexBuddy
share|improve this answer
    
[\w] is pointless, \w should be enough. –  Alin Purcaru Nov 30 '10 at 17:59
    
@Alin -- Licit point. Thanks! –  Sean Vieira Nov 30 '10 at 18:01

A separate question is being answered here. How to do the same thing but allow tags with at most two words?

/^\s*[a-z0-9]+(\s+[a-z0-9]+)?(\s*,\s*[a-z0-9]+(\s+[a-z0-9]+)?)*\s*$/

Tested.

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