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I have a class that creates a List<Action<int>> and holds on to them until a later time. This class can add and remove delegates from this list. This works well as long as people don't get too fancy. To combat anonymous function (which can't be removed) I check against the target of the delegate being null. If its null I throw an exception. The problem comes in when there is an anonymous delegate that contains a function. This has a target, but is just as unremovable. The simplified code below illustrates my issues

 public class MyDelegateContainer
 {
    List<Action<int>> m_Container = new List<Action<int>>();

    public void Add(Action<int> del)
    {
        if (del.Target == null) 
        { 
            throw new Exception("No static handlers"); 
        }
        m_Container.Add(del);
    }

    public bool Remove(Action<int> del)
    {
        if (m_Container.Contains(del))
        {
            m_Container.Remove(del);
            return true;
        }

        return false;
    }
}

public class MyFakeActionClass
{
    public void Test(int temp) { }
}

class Program
{
    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        bool removed = false;
        int counter = 0;
        MyDelegateContainer container = new MyDelegateContainer();
        MyFakeActionClass fake = new MyFakeActionClass();
        //container.Add(p => { }); //Throws, this is what I want to happen
        container.Add(fake.Test); //Works, this is the use case
        removed = container.Remove(fake.Test); //Works, this is the use case
        Debug.Assert(removed);
        container.Add(p => { fake.Test(p); counter++; }); //Works but I would like it not to
        removed = container.Remove(p => { fake.Test(p); counter++; }); //doesn't work
        Debug.Assert(removed);
    }
}

I need some way to identify

   p => { fake.Test(p); counter++; }

is an anonymous function so I can throw if someone tries it. Thanks for any help

EDIT: I should note that I could use an Action<int> variable for the anonymous function and everything would work, but the Add and Remove are never in the same scope in practice.

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If it's identified, it's not anonymous. Are you looking for a closure, instead?k –  Michael Paulukonis Nov 30 '10 at 19:45
    
I need some way to detect that its an anonymous function –  Steve Nov 30 '10 at 19:46
    
@Steve -- 28 questions with no accepted answer out of 83?! O_O And I'm only saying that coz you have a good score =) –  BeemerGuy Nov 30 '10 at 19:48
    
Why do you want the caller to prevent from adding unremovable delegates? Nothing stops the caller from not removing removable delegates. –  dtb Nov 30 '10 at 19:48
    
Could you could keep a Dictionary<string, Action<int>> instead and use a key? What's the use case for this? –  jonnii Nov 30 '10 at 19:49
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5 Answers

up vote 3 down vote accepted

There is no way to reliably determine whether a function is "anonymous" because all functions have names to the CLR. It's only anonymous within the language that generates it, and that's compiler-dependent. You may be able to determine the algorithm used by Microsoft's current C# compiler, only to have it stop working on C# 5 or Mono.

Since you want to prevent users of your type from writing code that uses it wrong, you just need to throw an exception at some point that will make their program crash. What I would do is throw the exception in the Remove function when the target delegate isn't found. At that point your users will still get a crash and the only way to fix it is to write the delegate in some way that it's removable.

As an added bonus, you will catch bugs where somebody tries to remove delegates twice or that were never added in the first place. The code would look like this:

public bool Remove(Action<int> del) 
{ 
    if (m_Container.Contains(del)) 
    { 
        m_Container.Remove(del); 
        return true; 
    } 

    throw new ArgumentException("Attempt to remove nonexistent delegate");
} 
share|improve this answer
    
so far, this seems like the best way to go. –  Steve Nov 30 '10 at 20:02
    
+1 for compiler-dependent explanation. –  Kai Wang Nov 30 '10 at 20:05
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In your example, the caller is responsible from removing the handler. So, if the caller doesn't want to remove the handler, it won't get removed, no matter if the handler is an anonymous delegate/lambda or not.

My suggestion is to change the delegate container to something like this:

public class MyDelegateContainer
{
    List<Action<int>> m_Container = new List<Action<int>>();

    public Action Add(Action<int> del)
    {
        m_Container.Add(del);

        return new Action(() =>
        {
            m_Container.Remove(del);
        });
    }
}

The caller is still responsible for removing the handler, but instead of passing the handler again to the container, it receives a "token" that it can save and use later to remove the handler.

share|improve this answer
1  
This is probably the way I'd go if faced with this problem. –  jonnii Nov 30 '10 at 19:55
    
Unfortunately, this is a very long lived class and I'm OK with people not removing them. I just need to be able to remove handlers dynamically from time to time. –  Steve Nov 30 '10 at 19:59
2  
This seems a bit pointless. Why bother storing the token when you could just store the original delegate in the first place? –  Gabe Nov 30 '10 at 20:10
    
Indeed, this answer is almost the same as Albin's: stackoverflow.com/questions/4317769/… –  Gabe Nov 30 '10 at 21:59
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I would use introspection to check the names of the methods.

Anonymous methods typically have very predictable names. (I don't remember the exact format, but run some tests, and it should be obvious).

The drawback would be that if anyone created a non-anonymous method, but decided to name it anonMethod123 (or whatever the format is...) It would be falsely rejected.

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3  
That works fine, up until the compiler changes. –  Gabe Nov 30 '10 at 20:19
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Of course you can remove an anonymous method, you just need to have a reference to the same anonymous method.

var myAnonymousMethod = p => { fake.Test(p); counter++; };
container.Add(myAnonymousMethod);
removed = container.Remove(myAnonymousMethod);
share|improve this answer
    
sorry, my edit stated that these things won't happen in the same scope typically, and I just want to prevent it completely –  Steve Nov 30 '10 at 19:47
    
@Steve, you should have really strong reasons to restrict the use of parts of the language. Look at events for example, you can subscribe an anonymous method if you don't plan to unsubscribe later, that is up to the user. Try to find another way around it, like give a method to search for existing delegates that you want to remove. –  Albin Sunnanbo Nov 30 '10 at 19:51
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As jonnii suggested in a comment, another way you could implement it is with a dictionary:

public class MyDelegateContainer 
{ 
    Dictionary<string, Action<int>> m_Container =
        new Dictionary<string, Action<int>>(); 

    public void Add(string key, Action<int> del) 
    { 
        m_Container.Add(key, del);
    } 

    public bool Remove(string key) 
    { 
        return m_Container.Remove(key); 
    } 
}

Then you could easily remove a known delegate at some arbitrary point in your code just by knowing what name was used to add it:

    container.Add("fake.Test", fake.Test);
    removed = container.Remove("fake.Test");
    Debug.Assert(removed);   
    container.Add("anon", p => { fake.Test(p); counter++; });
    removed = container.Remove("anon"); // works!
    Debug.Assert(removed);   
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