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In my WPF app, I have a feedback control that I want to appear after a user action completes (save data, delete...). The visibility is set to Hidden to begin and style set to the animateFadeOut style defined as a resource (see below). Then I want to set the text and control Visibility to visible in my C# code and have the feedback control display the message and fade out after 5 seconds and remain hidden (Visibility.Hidden).

The following XAML works the first time I call control.Visiblity= Visibility.Visible but the control doesn't reappear the second time. I figure that is because the animation is still running, which has control over the feedback control. I then tried to set FillBehavior to "Stop" but that just made the control visible again and I want it hidden. Then, with FillBehavior="Stop", I tried to set a trigger "when Opacity = 0, set the Visibility to Hidden". The trigger didn't seem to fire and I was left with the visible control once more after the animation completed.

Please help point out what I am doing wrong here.

Alternatively, if you can suggest a better way to display a control that fades after 5 seconds and can be called over and over, I would appreciate it.

Thanks!

<Style TargetType="{x:Type FrameworkElement}" x:Key="animateFadeOut">
        <Style.Triggers>
            <Trigger Property="Visibility" Value="Visible">
                <Trigger.EnterActions>
                    <BeginStoryboard >
                        <Storyboard>
                            <DoubleAnimation BeginTime="0:0:5.0" Storyboard.TargetProperty="Opacity"
                         From="1.0" To="0.0" Duration="0:0:0.5"/>
                        </Storyboard>
                    </BeginStoryboard>             
                </Trigger.EnterActions>
            </Trigger>
        </Style.Triggers> 
    </Style>
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I took a slightly different approach to fix the problem... I wrote it in C#. (See post below- the comment section is too small for code posts) –  sondlerd Nov 30 '10 at 20:56

4 Answers 4

up vote 12 down vote accepted

The problem is that after your animation completes your control still has Visibility=Visible, so it cannot be entered again.
I would rather use animation that does the whole thing, first shows the control, then hides it.

<Storyboard x:Key="animate">
    <ObjectAnimationUsingKeyFrames BeginTime="0:0:0" Storyboard.TargetProperty="Visibility">
        <DiscreteObjectKeyFrame KeyTime="0">
            <DiscreteObjectKeyFrame.Value>
                <Visibility>Visible</Visibility>
            </DiscreteObjectKeyFrame.Value>
        </DiscreteObjectKeyFrame>
    </ObjectAnimationUsingKeyFrames>
    <DoubleAnimation BeginTime="0:0:0.0" Storyboard.TargetProperty="Opacity" From="0" To="1" Duration="0:0:0.2"/>
    <DoubleAnimation BeginTime="0:0:5.0" Storyboard.TargetProperty="Opacity" From="1" To="0" Duration="0:0:0.5"/>
    <ObjectAnimationUsingKeyFrames BeginTime="0:0:5.5" Storyboard.TargetProperty="Visibility">
        <DiscreteObjectKeyFrame KeyTime="0">
            <DiscreteObjectKeyFrame.Value>
                <Visibility>Hidden</Visibility>
            </DiscreteObjectKeyFrame.Value>
        </DiscreteObjectKeyFrame>
    </ObjectAnimationUsingKeyFrames>
</Storyboard>

And use it as follows:

((Storyboard)FindResource("animate")).Begin(someControl);
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thanks, Alpha-Mouse. You answered the question I posted below to Liz. Another question, once the animation finishes, does the opacity=0.0 or is that only in the animation? I ask because when I set the FillBehavior to Stop, the opacity returned to 1.0. –  sondlerd Nov 30 '10 at 21:06
    
@sondlerd: when FillBehaviour is Stop then yes, the value of the property returns to it's original value –  alpha-mouse Nov 30 '10 at 22:14

This should fix your storyboard.

However, remember that once the animation is complete, your control is completely opaque - invisible, but your Visibility property is still set to Visible. So you'll have to make sure that the Visibility property is reset to hidden or collapsed somewhere too.

<Style TargetType="{x:Type FrameworkElement}" x:Key="animateFadeOut">
         <Style.Triggers>
            <Trigger Property="Visibility" Value="Visible">
               <Trigger.EnterActions>
                  <BeginStoryboard Name="MyFadeEffect">
                     <Storyboard>
                        <DoubleAnimation BeginTime="0:0:5.0" Storyboard.TargetProperty="Opacity"
                         From="1.0" To="0.0" Duration="0:0:0.5"/>
                     </Storyboard>
                  </BeginStoryboard>
               </Trigger.EnterActions>
               <Trigger.ExitActions>
                  <StopStoryboard BeginStoryboardName="MyFadeEffect"/>
               </Trigger.ExitActions>
            </Trigger>
         </Style.Triggers>
      </Style>
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thanks for the quick reply. can I set the Visibility to Hidden at the end of the storyboard to fix the issue you brought up, "your Visibility property is still set to Visible"? –  sondlerd Nov 30 '10 at 21:02
    
No, I tried that, but you can't change the value of the property that serves as the condition for your trigger. But now you know how to stop your animation. :) –  Liz Nov 30 '10 at 21:10

Liz is correct about Visibility still being Visible. alpha-mouse is also correct that you need to set it back to Hidden at some point. But it won't work if you set it back before the animation is completed like this:

MyControl.Visibility = System.Windows.Visibility.Visible;
MyControl.Visibility = System.Windows.Visibility.Hidden;

because animations take higher precedence (MSDN)

You can set it back to Hidden in Storyboard.Completed event:

private void Show()
    {
        MyControl.Visibility = System.Windows.Visibility.Visible;

        var a = new DoubleAnimation
                    {
                        From = 1.0,
                        To = 0.0,
                        FillBehavior= FillBehavior.Stop,
                        BeginTime = TimeSpan.FromSeconds(2),
                        Duration = new Duration(TimeSpan.FromSeconds(0.5))
                    };
        var storyboard = new Storyboard();

        storyboard.Children.Add(a);
        Storyboard.SetTarget(a, MyControl);
        Storyboard.SetTargetProperty(a, new PropertyPath(OpacityProperty));
        storyboard.Completed += delegate { MyControl.Visibility = System.Windows.Visibility.Hidden; };
        storyboard.Begin();            
    }
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thanks Kai, I seem to keep coming back to C# to get things done in WPF. I'm relatively new to WPF (worked on it for 6 months in 2007 and then the past three weeks for a project). Maybe it is just the learning curve. Thanks for pointing out the storyboard.Completed event. –  sondlerd Nov 30 '10 at 21:09
    
@sondlerd: As long as it gets things done, I don't mind doing it in code. In fact, in this case I think doing in code is more clear than in xaml. –  Kai Wang Nov 30 '10 at 21:16

Here is my work around. This fades a control in and back out again. Instead of playing around with the Visibility, I handled it by playing only with the Opacity.

Thanks to Kane from this post for the orginal code: Fade any control using a WPF animation

Storyboard storyboard = new Storyboard();
TimeSpan duration = TimeSpan.FromMilliseconds(500); //

DoubleAnimation fadeInAnimation = new DoubleAnimation() 
    { From = 0.0, To = 1.0, Duration = new Duration(duration) };

DoubleAnimation fadeOutAnimation = new DoubleAnimation()
    { From = 1.0, To = 0.0, Duration = new Duration(duration) };
fadeOutAnimation.BeginTime = TimeSpan.FromSeconds(5);

Storyboard.SetTargetName(fadeInAnimation, element.Name);
Storyboard.SetTargetProperty(fadeInAnimation, new PropertyPath("Opacity", 1));
storyboard.Children.Add(fadeInAnimation);
storyboard.Begin(element);

Storyboard.SetTargetName(fadeOutAnimation, element.Name);
Storyboard.SetTargetProperty(fadeOutAnimation, new PropertyPath("Opacity", 0));
storyboard.Children.Add(fadeOutAnimation);
storyboard.Begin(element);
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I tried this option, and it worked for me, thank you! –  GrayFox374 Feb 26 '13 at 16:00

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