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Let's say I have an entity that looks like this:

public class Album()
{
    public DateTime LastUpdated { get; set; }
    public List<Picture> Pictures { get; set; }
}

What I want to do is create a LastActivity property that will return the latest date of the activity. This is easy enough for the Pictures collection:

public DateTime LastActivity
{
    get { return Pictures.Max(x => x.LastUpdated); }
}

However, I also want to consider the LastUpdated property on the Album entity as well. I could use this code:

public DateTime LastActivity
{
    get { return Pictures.Max(x => x.LastUpdated) > this.LastUpdated
              ? Pictures.Max(x => x.LastUpdated)
              : this.LastUpdated) };
}

But this is bad because it will do the Max() transformation twice. Is there a better way of writing this code?

Answer

This is the solution I came up with, based on the accepted answer:

public virtual DateTime LastActivity
{
    get
    {
        var max = Pictures.Any() ? Pictures.Max(x => x.LastUpdated) : DateTime.MinValue;
        return max > this.LastUpdated ? max : this.LastUpdated;
    }
}

The thing to watch out for is that if you do a Max() on an empty collection, you'll get an exception, so you have to check to see if there's anything in the collection first.

share|improve this question
    
@mcl solution performs at about 35% faster then yours. But it's surprising that the compiler cannot optimize the above call. It actually creates separate delegate for each Pictures.Max call... weird. Sometimes it can optimize but sometimes it can't. In this particular case I wonder why it can't ... –  user44298 Nov 30 '10 at 20:58

9 Answers 9

up vote 7 down vote accepted

Just store the max in a variable rather that performing the calculation twice.

public DateTime LastActivity
{
    get 
    { 
        var max = Pictures.Max(x => x.LastUpdated);
        return max > this.LastUpdated
          ? max
          : this.LastUpdated 
    };
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks. I was hoping there'd be some .NET method to handle it, but sometimes the naive method is the best. –  Daniel T. Nov 30 '10 at 20:58

Just assign the picture dates maximum to a local variable and then do the comparison you've already written.

share|improve this answer
public DateTime LastActivity
{
    get
    {
        var picturesMax = Pictures.Max(x => x.LastUpdated);
        return picturesMax > this.LastUpdated
          ? picturesMax
          : this.LastUpdated)
    };
}
share|improve this answer

How about this?

public DateTime LastActivity 
{ 
    get 
    {
         DateTime lastPicture = Pictures.Max(x => x.LastUpdated);
         return lastPicture > this.LastUpdated ? lastPicture : this.LastUpdated;
     }
} 
share|improve this answer

I use the following in a framework library...

public static T Maximum<T>(params T[] values) 
    where T : struct, IComparable<T>
{
    var rV = values[0];
    foreach (var v in values.Where
        (v => v.CompareTo(rV) > 0))
        rV = v;
    return rV;
}

In client code I can simply write

var maxVal = lib.Maximum(Value1, Value2, .... , ValueN);

share|improve this answer

Just store the max value in a temporary:

public DateTime LastActivity
{
    get {
        DateTime maxLastUpdated = Pictures.Max(x => x.LastUpdated);
        return maxLastUpdated > this.LastUpdated
            ? maxLastUpdated
            : this.LastUpdated) };
}
share|improve this answer
public DateTime LastActivity
{         
    get { return Pictures.Select(x => x.LastUpdated).Concat(new DateTime[] { this.LastUpdated }).Max();
}
share|improve this answer

To keep it LINQy...

public DateTime LastActivity
{
    get 
    { 
         return Pictures.Any(x => x.LastUpdated > this.LastUpdated) 
                ? Pictures.Max(x => x.LastUpdated) 
                : this.LastUpdated; 
    }
}

Update(s): added the default LastUpdated to be returned if the LINQ expression returns no results, and corrected for the OP's comment.

share|improve this answer
    
Unfortunately, Max() on an empty collection will throw an exception, not return null. –  Daniel T. Nov 30 '10 at 20:56
    
Ugh, you're right! My mistake. Corrected. Back to ternary-operator land... –  Dan J Nov 30 '10 at 22:27

This is fairly straightforward and should take an empty Pictures collection in its stride:

public DateTime LastActivity
{
    get
    {
        return Pictures.Aggregate(LastUpdated,
                            (a, x) => x.LastUpdated > a ? x.LastUpdated : a);
    }
}
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