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When user logs into facebook using the popup displayed by FB.login() call, JS SDK plants to my domain a cookie containing oauth access_token in plain text. Then, this cookie is being sent to my server with every subsequent request - and it's pretty obvious that not every request uses https.

Isn't this a security problem? If so, then how to solve it?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

An attacker, who is able to sniff the network traffic (e. g. a wireless lan), can read the cookie. And pretend to be the person it was created for.

This is not really an issue because the same attack works on the facebook pages itself: Only the username/password - authentication is done via https. All following pages use unencrypted http, which contain the cookie.

There is an easy-to-use Firefox extension which allows steeling of cookies, if you are able to sniff the network traffic: http://codebutler.com/firesheep

PS: stackoverflow.com is vulnerable, too.

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Thank you. I was so concerned about FB cookie that I overlooked that any other cookie can be hijacked as well, which makes my concern irrelevant as there is my more serious one in the garden! –  Tomasz Zielinski Dec 1 '10 at 12:12
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It isn't a problem because you can verify the authenticity of the cookie. Facebook includes a value called sig with each cookie. I won't go into full details, but basically, you append your API secret to the cookie, remove the sig value, hash the cookie value and verify that the hash matches the sig. Because you and Facebook are the only ones that know the value of the API secret you can be sure that the cookie wasn't tampered with.

The other side of the things, the user viewing the contents of the cookie, doesnt matter either. The cookie only contains an access token associated with that user. If the user tries to tamper with the cookie the only thing that will happen is they will make the cookie invalid. And their access token only gets them access to their own account anyway.

The most important thing is verifying the cookie is authentic. Many people dont do this and do cause huge security issues. For example, the cookie contains the facebook user id. Say I get that user Id then ask my user for their credit card. If I store that credit card with that user ID, but dont validate the cookie, anyone could come in and change the user id value in there cookie and get access to private data. However, if I verify the cookie with the API secret, I would know if the cookie was tampered with.

Here is how we validate the cookie in my Facebook C# SDK (http://facebooksdk.codeplex.com):

        /// <summary>
        /// Validates a session_version=3 style session object.
        /// </summary>
        /// <param name="session">The session to validate.</param>
        protected override void ValidateSessionObject(FacebookSession session)
        {
            if (session == null)
            {
                return;
            }

            var signature = this.GenerateSignature(session);
            if (session.Signature == signature.ToString())
            {
                return;
            }

            session = null;
        }

        /// <summary>
        /// Generates a MD5 signature for the facebook session.
        /// </summary>
        /// <param name="session">The session to generate a signature.</param>
        /// <returns>An MD5 signature.</returns>
        /// <exception cref="System.ArgumentNullException">If the session is null.</exception>
        /// <exception cref="System.InvalidOperationException">If there is a problem generating the hash.</exception>
        protected override string GenerateSignature(FacebookSession session)
        {
            var args = session.Dictionary;
            StringBuilder payload = new StringBuilder();
            var parts = (from a in args
                         orderby a.Key
                         where a.Key != "sig"
                         select string.Format(CultureInfo.InvariantCulture, "{0}={1}", a.Key, a.Value)).ToList();
            parts.ForEach((s) => { payload.Append(s); });
            payload.Append(this.ApiSecret);
            byte[] hash = null;
            using (var md5 = System.Security.Cryptography.MD5CryptoServiceProvider.Create())
            {
                if (md5 != null)
                {
                    hash = md5.ComputeHash(Encoding.UTF8.GetBytes(payload.ToString()));
                }
            }

            if (hash == null)
            {
                throw new InvalidOperationException("Hash is not valid.");
            }

            StringBuilder signature = new StringBuilder();
            for (int i = 0; i < hash.Length; i++)
            {
                signature.Append(hash[i].ToString("x2", CultureInfo.InvariantCulture));
            }

            return signature.ToString();
        }
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The attack is to copy the cookie of someone else and pretend to be the victim. So verification of it will confirm that it is a valid. –  Hendrik Brummermann Dec 1 '10 at 6:51
    
I meant what nhnb wrote, but I appreciate your answer as well. –  Tomasz Zielinski Dec 1 '10 at 12:09
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