Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

I am trying to run a buffer overflow example to run some code, but the problem is that when I try to run the code just to get a buffer overflow, Windows throws a prompt up stating "Program has stopped working, Windows is checking for a solution to the program. So when I try to make sure it just has a overflow by one byte. The program just runs, but doesn't pause the command window in order for me to see the segmentation fault error address. Which to my understanding I would need in order to change it and make it run my desired window as the passed parameter.Here is the simple program.

#define BUF_LEN 5

int main(int argc, char **argv)
{

char buf[BUF_LEN];

if (argc > 1)
{
 strcpy(buf, argv[1]);
}
 return 0;
 printf(buf);
 system("pause");
}
share|improve this question
    
What's the length of argv[1]? – zebrabox Dec 1 '10 at 0:11
    
I make it at least more than buff, for example buff is now 5 in this program, so I make it "AAAAAAAA" – Eric Dec 1 '10 at 0:21
up vote 1 down vote accepted

The problem lies with the fact that buffer overflow behavior is not standardized - your example may refer to an older version of Windows, which still printed an error address, or to a completely different operating system.

Additionally, not all buffer overflows cause the program to crash - it depends on what data is written where. For small buffer overflows, you may be overwriting only some other local variables or padding space, instead of anything essential for the program execution (like the function return address).

share|improve this answer
    
this actually answered the question – Eric May 31 '11 at 20:02

Segmentation faults are just one manifestation of undefined behaviour. There is really nothing that guarantees you that the OS will give you any information about what went wrong here.

You don't need the address in order to diagnose the segfault anyway. There is exactly one thing that can cause a buffer overflow here and you know exactly what it is: the strcpy() call.

Assuming you must use C, the fix is to use strncpy() instead.

share|improve this answer
    
I may be mistaken, but if I read the OP right, he intentionally wants to cause a buffer overflow for exercise purposes. – Lars Dec 1 '10 at 0:15
    
I know that strncpy() will prevent the buffer overflow. but I am trying to create an exmaple to show what I can make happen by causing one with some shellcode, but I assummed I need the seg fault address to do that – Eric Dec 1 '10 at 0:16
    
@Lars- you are correct – Eric Dec 1 '10 at 0:16
    
This doesnt answer my question at all but yet it has two votes? – Eric Dec 1 '10 at 0:34
    
@Eric: What part of "undefined behavior" didn't you understand? – Ira Baxter Mar 11 '11 at 4:03
#define BUF_LEN 5

int main(int argc, char **argv)
{

char buf[BUF_LEN];

if (argc > 1)
{
 strcpy(buf, argv[1]);
}

 printf(buf);
 system("pause");
 return 0;
}

return 0; goes in the end. Otherwise the program execution stops there.

share|improve this answer
    
thanks,now it prints the buf but it still runs into the same problem by not outputing an error address.. Isn't this what I should get – Eric Dec 1 '10 at 0:07
    
I dont think it is supposed to print an error address. more like a "SegFault" Thingy. – GeorgeAl Dec 1 '10 at 0:08
    
it doesnt print anything.. it prints the buf like there was no error, but when i press the any key to continue, it runs a Windows prompt load issue error I mentioned above and then closes – Eric Dec 1 '10 at 0:09
    
I make it at least more than buff, for example buff is now 5 in this program, so I make it "AAAAAAAA" – Eric Dec 1 '10 at 0:12
    
Well you just end up writing on memory you shouldn't, thats all, and its not good. nothing really bad will happen unless you overwrite something usefull. – GeorgeAl Dec 1 '10 at 0:17

On compiling use "gcc -fno-stack-protector -o out filename.c", because gcc contains inbuilt stack protector and u have to remove it. -fno-stack-protector will remove the protector function from gcc

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.