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I'm using javamail to send emails to a list of recipients, but don't want them to be able to see who else received the email. I also don't want to send it using BCC since then the user doesn't even see themselves in the TO list. I thought this code would do it, but it shows all the recipients in the TO list. Other than creating a loop and sending the emails one at a time, is there another way to do this?

(NOTE: recipients[] is a string array containing the email addresses.)

javax.mail.internet.InternetAddress[] addressTo = new javax.mail.internet.InternetAddress[recipients.length];

for (int i = 0; i < recipients.length; i++)
{
    addressTo[i] = new javax.mail.internet.InternetAddress(recipients[i]);
}

msg.setRecipients(javax.mail.Message.RecipientType.TO, addressTo); 
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7 Answers 7

No, there isn't a way to do this with email.

You have to explicitly build and send an email iterating by each of your recipients, one of them as the sole member of your addressTo array.

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3  
+1 People on a mailing list expect to see the mailing list address in the "to" header. People subscribed for "special promotional offers" emails don't care what is in the "to" header. If you want to keep it personal, then you're not getting it. People can sense when an email is copy/paste mass send BS. If you're doing it right your message content will contain at least one $username variable and then you have to send it 1 by 1. –  Tim Bender Dec 1 '10 at 0:30
    
That's how I felt about BCC, it looks less personal when there is nothing in the TO box. So I was hoping to stay away from that. –  Don Dec 1 '10 at 18:22
    
This answer is incorrect. See my answer from June 29 2012. –  Maxy-B Jun 29 '12 at 20:49
    
@TimBender: a user seeing the mailing list address in the "To:" header despite the message having been delivered to the user's address, is exactly what the OP is trying to do. What do you think a mailing list daemon does? –  Maxy-B Jun 30 '12 at 15:45
1  
lol @Maxy-B, it definitely doesn't place each recipient's address individually in the "To:" header before delivery such that each recipient only sees their own address. –  Tim Bender Jul 3 '12 at 21:02

Perfect program for sending mail to multiple users with attachments.

package home.test.source;

import javax.activation.DataHandler;
import javax.activation.DataSource;
import javax.activation.FileDataSource;
import javax.mail.Authenticator;
import javax.mail.BodyPart;
import javax.mail.Multipart;
import javax.mail.PasswordAuthentication;
import javax.mail.Session;
import javax.mail.Transport;
import javax.mail.internet.InternetAddress;
import javax.mail.internet.MimeBodyPart;
import javax.mail.internet.MimeMessage;
import javax.mail.internet.MimeMessage.RecipientType;
import javax.mail.internet.MimeMultipart;

import java.util.Properties;

class tester {
    @SuppressWarnings("static-access")
    public static void main(String args[]) {
        Properties props = new Properties();
        props.put("mail.smtp.host", "smtp.gmail.com");
        props.put("mail.stmp.user", "abc@gmail.com");          
        //If you want you use TLS 
        props.put("mail.smtp.auth", "true");

        props.put("mail.smtp.starttls.enable", "true");
        props.put("mail.smtp.password", "password");
        // If you want to use SSL
        props.put("mail.smtp.socketFactory.port", "465");
        props.put("mail.smtp.socketFactory.class",
                   "javax.net.ssl.SSLSocketFactory");
        props.put("mail.smtp.auth", "true");
        props.put("mail.smtp.port", "465");
        Session session = Session.getDefaultInstance(props, new Authenticator() {
            @Override
            protected PasswordAuthentication getPasswordAuthentication() {
                String username = "abc@gmail.com";
                String password = "password";
                return new PasswordAuthentication(username,password); 
            }
        });
        String[] to = {"test1@gmail.com","test2@yahoo.in","test3@gmail.com","test4@gmail.com"};
        String from = "abc@gmail.com";
        String subject = "Testing...";
        MimeMessage msg = new MimeMessage(session);
        try {
            msg.setFrom(new InternetAddress(from));
            InternetAddress[] addressTo = new InternetAddress[to.length];
            for (int i = 0; i < to.length; i++)
            {
                addressTo[i] = new InternetAddress(to[i]);
            }
            msg.setRecipients(RecipientType.TO, addressTo); 
            // msg.setRecipient(MimeMessage.RecipientType.TO, new InternetAddress(to));
            msg.setSubject(subject);
            // msg.setText("JAVA is the BEST");

            // Create the message part 
            BodyPart messageBodyPart = new MimeBodyPart();

            // Fill the message
            messageBodyPart.setText("This is message body");

            // Create a multipar message
            Multipart multipart = new MimeMultipart();

            // Set text message part
            multipart.addBodyPart(messageBodyPart);

            // Part two is attachment
            messageBodyPart = new MimeBodyPart();
            String filename = "file.txt";
            DataSource source = new FileDataSource(filename);
            messageBodyPart.setDataHandler(new DataHandler(source));
            messageBodyPart.setFileName(filename);
            multipart.addBodyPart(messageBodyPart);

            // Send the complete message parts
            msg.setContent(multipart );

            Transport transport = session.getTransport("smtp");
            transport.send(msg);
            System.out.println("E-mail sent !");
        }
        catch(Exception exc) {
            System.out.println(exc);
        }
    }
}
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4  
This does not answer the OP's question, and in fact does exactly what he said he doesn't want (every recipient visible in the "To:" header). –  Maxy-B Jun 29 '12 at 20:52

The SMTP protocol doesn't care who's listed in the message and the recipients specified on the RCPT TO command are only used to figure out who to transport the message to. There's nothing stopping you from building the RFC822 message with the To header as you've defined above and then writing a custom SMTP client that send your particular message out but with a different set of recipients. And just because you can send the message doesn't mean a spam filter along the way is going to notice the wonky recipient headers and block the message.

In my experience, JavaMail's SMTP client is really good at sending basic messages without any of the mail tricks you often seen used by mailing list providers and spammers. Those companies spend a lot of effort to make sure they can send messages the way they want but they also are in a constant fight to make sure they're messages are treated as legit email.

Short answer: I'd resort to BCC and if this is for marketing purposes, consider using a company that specializes in this kind of thing.

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+1. If the "To" header is omitted, then many mail clients will say something like "Undisclosed Recipients" in the "To" field in the client. Also, I think it's awesome that my upvote made your rep become 822! –  Jeremy Heiler Apr 7 '12 at 22:43
    
+1 -- and note that the JavaMail API is capable of setting the RCPT TO recipients independently of the message headers. See my answer. –  Maxy-B Jun 29 '12 at 20:50

What's holding you back from sending mails one by one? I don't know javamail specifically, but I've done lots of email automation before and I can't imagine there'd be any other way.

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I was thinking about performance. This will allow the user to input up to 25 addresses and it would have to send all of them before refreshing the page. Also not sure how many people might be using it concurrently. –  Don Dec 1 '10 at 18:20

Why are you concerned about the recipient not seeing his own address? He already knows his his own address, so why is it an issue? BCC was designed to handle exactly the problem you describe. It's been around for decades & sounds like a perfect fit.

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Because I read about issues with BCC, that there are ways to see in the headers, etc. Also that some email providers can only handle a few addresses in BCC. –  Don Dec 1 '10 at 18:17

According to the documentation for javax.mail.Transport:

public static void send(Message msg,
                        Address[] addresses)
                 throws MessagingException

Send the message to the specified addresses, ignoring any recipients specified
in the message itself.

So you should be able to put the actual delivery addresses (RCPT TO addresses) in the array argument to Transport.send, while putting whatever you want the recipients to see in the message headers via Message.setRecipient, MIMEMessage.addHeader, etc.

If you want different sets of users to see different things, you will have to construct and send a separate message for each set.

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1  
The OP wants each individual addressee to see ONLY their address in the TO header. If the OP were to follow your advice, the set size for the number of recipients of each email would always be 1. At the end of the day, there is no way to send one single bulk email that looks different for every recipient. –  Tim Bender Jul 2 '12 at 18:27

Actually, we don't have to manually create InternetAddress objects for Multi Recepients. InternetAddress api provides a parse() method to do this for us. Sample code for this is as below,

msg.setRecipients(Message.RecipientType.TO,  InternetAddress.parse(toAddress));

Here parse method creates multiple InternetAddress objects if toAddress contains multiple email addresses seperated by ,(comma).

Check for below API for more details.

http://docs.oracle.com/javaee/6/api/javax/mail/internet/InternetAddress.html#parse(java.lang.String)

Happy Coding. :)

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