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How do I assign incremental names in a list?

>>> ccList
['az <az@example.com>', 'cc777 <cc777@example.com>', 'user11 <user11@example.com>']
>>> for i in range(len(ccList)):
    mailTuple = parseaddr(ccList[i])
    cc = mailTuple[0]
    print cc

az
cc777
user11
>>> 
>>> for i in range(3):
    name = "name"+str(i)
    print name

name0
name1
name2
>>>

I was trying to end up with

name0 = az
name1 = cc77
name2 = user11

so that I can refer to these names later. How can I do this? Basically, I don't understand how to write this:

>>> for i in range(len(ccList)):
    mailTuple = parseaddr(ccList[i])
    cc = mailTuple[0]
    "name"+str(i) = cc
    ....

Of course, this does not work. Thanks!

Update

Thanks to everyone with great answers! I think this list solution by Thomas K will work in this case; except that I could not solve how to print if cc recipients are other than 3:

>>> ccNames = []

>>> for i in range(len(ccList)):
    mailTuple = parseaddr(ccList[i])
    cc = mailTuple[0]
    ccNames.append(cc)

>>> "sender attached %s ccs which are %s, %s, and %s" % (len(ccNames), ccNames[0], ccNames[1], ccNames[2])
'sender attached 3 ccs which are az, cc777, and user11'
>>>

So how do I fix the code so that if there are other than 3 ccs, it still prints all cc recipients?

share|improve this question
3  
What's wrong with just using the index for the list, tuple, etc.? –  Rafe Kettler Dec 1 '10 at 0:35
4  
Why is name1 better than the usual name[1]? –  Thomas K Dec 1 '10 at 0:35
1  
Look up the python dictionary or 'dict' structure. It's great for doing key-value pair stuff like this. –  DGH Dec 1 '10 at 0:38

5 Answers 5

up vote 2 down vote accepted

As others have commented, you really don't want to create new names for this. You want to have a list, just like the list that your input consists of. Then you can index into it the same way you indexed into the original.

Creating a list with just the names is this easy:

nameList = [parseaddr(cc)[0] for cc in ccList]

Regarding the update, this should do the trick:

>>> ccNames = [parseaddr(cc)[0] for cc in ccList]
>>> "sender attached %s ccs which are %s, and %s" % (len(ccNames), ', '.join(ccNames[:-1]), ccNames[-1])
'sender attached 3 ccs which are az, cc777, and user11'

We take all of the names except the last, and join them up into a single string with ', ' in between each adjacent pair. Then we substitute that into our final format string, putting the last name at the end (this allows us to handle the "and" neatly).

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the answer. I will go with the list if I can solve the string formatting for any given number of ccs as I mentioned in the Update. Thanks again. –  Zeynel Dec 1 '10 at 1:21
1  
@Zeynel I updated in response. You'll have to handle the special case of less than 3 names, though. I assume you want slightly different formatting for each of those cases (0, 1 or 2 names)... think about it :) –  Karl Knechtel Dec 1 '10 at 1:40

If you really want to refer to the names as name0, name1, etc. I would suggest using a dictionary:

names = {}
for i in range(len(ccList)):
  mailTuple = parseaddr(ccList[i])
  cc = mailTuple[0]
  names["name"+str(i)] = cc

Then you can access name0 with names["name0"], names["name1"], etc. This is a much safer option than mucking with exec / the locals dictionary as some other answers suggest.

Although the best solution, in my opinion, is to simply use a list as you use for mailTuple.

names = []
for i in range(len(ccList)):
  mailTuple = parseaddr(ccList[i])
  names.append(mailTuple[0])

As a side note, you should consider a better name for mailTuple as it isn't even a tuple. A suggestion from me is to simply name it mails.

share|improve this answer
    
The list code won't quite work: you can't assign to an element that doesn't exist. You'll need names.append(... on the last line. –  Thomas K Dec 1 '10 at 1:01
    
@Thomas Doh! Of course, fixed! –  marcog Dec 1 '10 at 1:05

Unless there's some obvious reason not to, simply use a list:

names = []
for i in range(len(ccList)):
    mailTuple = parseaddr(ccList[i])
    names.append(mailTuple[0])

names[0]  # az
names[1]  # cc77

There's a briefer way to make the list, too:

names = [parseaddr(ccaddr)[0] for ccaddr in ccList]
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the answer. I added an update to format the list elements with string formatting so that it handles any given number of cc recipients. Any suggestions? –  Zeynel Dec 1 '10 at 1:18
    
@Zeynel: Karl Knechtel's solution looks good to me. –  Thomas K Dec 1 '10 at 10:17

Try:

for i in range(len(ccList)):
    mailTuple = parseaddr(ccList[i])
    cc = mailTuple[0]
    exec("name%d=cc"%i)
share|improve this answer
    
This looks like it will work, but please don't! Python has real data structures, and we should use them. Creating new variable names on the fly is how some dynamic languages expect you to work, but it's extremely un-Pythonic. –  Karl Knechtel Dec 1 '10 at 0:48
    
... but please don't do it this way, ever! –  Chris Morgan Dec 1 '10 at 0:53
    
@Karl Knechtel: Agreed. Using a list is the right way to do it. –  Kabie Dec 1 '10 at 0:54

You can add to the dict returned from vars():

for i in range(len(ccList)):
    mailTuple = parseaddr(ccList[i])
    cc = mailTuple[0]
    vars()["name"+str(i)] = cc

Once you do this, variables should exist with your desired names.

share|improve this answer
    
I'd strongly encourage steering clear of modifying the locals dictionary, unless you absolutely must. And I see no reason to do so here. A separate dictionary is much more sane and works just as well. Afterall, when you read the values you're also going to be looping so won't be using print name0 or the likes. –  marcog Dec 1 '10 at 0:44
1  
-1 because, while you're managing precisely what the question specifies, it's almost certainly more helpful to point to a sane alternative. I'll undo it if it turns out there's a good reason why it's needed. –  Thomas K Dec 1 '10 at 0:49
    
... but please don't do it this way, ever! –  Chris Morgan Dec 1 '10 at 0:54

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