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I know the number of lines of code is completely arbitrary and a horrible metric. Even so, after a long day I like to click a little button and see that my pet project grew by 10%. (Or if I spent the day refactoring yet again it slimmed down by 10%, woohoo!)

I've used two line counters that can analyze code from CodeProject in the past, but they only handle .cs files, completely dismissing my extensive work in .aspx, .asmx, .js, .css, etc.

Has anyone used a line counter that could parse all the text files usually found on a typical ASP.NET site?

Update

CMS recommended CLOC, which was indeed exactly what I was looking for. Here's my output for the curious. It even counted my MSBuild script!

C:\Web>cloc-1.06.exe --exclude-dir=.svn,bin,images AST
     474 text files.
     474 unique files.
   28254 files ignored.

http://cloc.sourceforge.net v 1.06  T=70.0 s (6.3 files/s, 737.7 lines/s)
-------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Language          files     blank   comment      code    scale   3rd gen. equiv
-------------------------------------------------------------------------------
C#                  332      4670      9666     21255 x   1.36 =       28906.80
ASP.Net              91        58         0      4053 x   1.29 =        5228.37
Javascript            9      1262      2112      4011 x   1.48 =        5936.28
CSS                   5       193        42      1665 x   1.00 =        1665.00
MSBuild scripts       1         0         7      1413 x   1.90 =        2684.70
HTML                  2       126         5       429 x   1.90 =         815.10
XML                   1         0         0       392 x   1.90 =         744.80
PHP                   1        21        13       249 x   3.50 =         871.50
-------------------------------------------------------------------------------
SUM:                442      6330     11845     33467 x   1.40 =       46852.55
-------------------------------------------------------------------------------
share|improve this question
    
Actually, I don't think LOC is a terrible metric. Of course, it is not the ONE METRIC TO RULE THEM ALL; however, it gives you an idea of scale. For instance, Minix 3 was written in less than 10,000 lines while Windows XP, I believe a few hundred million lines. :) –  BobbyShaftoe Jan 11 '09 at 0:38
    
If you refactor your code, remove a bunch of cruft, and your line count goes down, do you feel better or worse at the end of the day? –  tvanfosson Jan 11 '09 at 0:41

2 Answers 2

up vote 6 down vote accepted

Give a look to CLOC

Check the output:

-------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Language          files     blank   comment      code    scale   3rd gen. equiv
-------------------------------------------------------------------------------
ASP.Net              21       290         0      3424 x   1.29 =        4416.96
XML                   1         0         0        26 x   1.90 =          49.40
DOS Batch             1         1         0         8 x   0.63 =           5.04
C#                    1         0         0         4 x   1.36 =           5.44
-------------------------------------------------------------------------------
SUM:                 24       291         0      3462 x   1.29 =        4476.84
-------------------------------------------------------------------------------

You can check also other code counters:

share|improve this answer
    
CLOC was exactly what I was looking for, I've added my output above. –  DavGarcia Jan 11 '09 at 4:16

You might be able to get the same level of satisfaction from counting passing unit tests. While this number, too, can be misleading, at least the unit tests (if not simply done to increase your count) have some valid bearing on the quality of your code.

share|improve this answer
    
While a good point, this does not answer the question. –  Andrew Hare Jan 11 '09 at 0:46
    
+1 - doesn't answer the exact question, but does speak to the sentiment behind it, that is, getting some numerical satisfaction after a day of coding. –  Ian Varley Jan 11 '09 at 1:16
    
+1 - Trust me, I do get that same level of satisfaction from all my new little NUnit tests turning green. –  DavGarcia Jan 11 '09 at 4:15

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