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I have a superclass Shape, and classes Triangle, Square, etc extend Shape. I have 2 issues highlighted in the code below.

public class Shape {
 public static Shape createShapeFromXML(String xml) {
  String type = parse(xml);
  if (type.equals("Triangle") {
   Triangle.createShapeFromXML(xml);
  } else if (...) {
   // ...
  }
 }
}

public class Triangle extends Shape {
 public static Triangle createShapeFromXML(String xml) {
  // 1. Not compilable. Has to return Shape, not Triangle
  // 2. I want to hide this method. It should only be callable from superclass Shape
  ....
 }
}

public static void main(String[] args) {
 String xml = ...
 Shape s = Shape.createShapeFromXML(xml);
}

Any advice on how I would fix or redesign this? Thanks.

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3 Answers 3

up vote 6 down vote accepted

why don't you keep the one static method in the superclass, and have it return the appropriate Shape subclass? The signature would stay the same because Triangles have an is-a relationship to Shape.

You could make the method on the superclass private to get the access restriction you want...

Another approach would be to use the Factory pattern. You could have a ShapeFactory... This is a good idea because creating the xml parsing is not a concern of the Shape classes. Separate your concerns. The wikipedia link is good at describing the pattern, but you might want a simpler example. See this.

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1  
Specifically, I think this qualifies as an example of an Abstract Factory. I don't really know why the GoF classified them as two separate patterns. –  Karl Knechtel Dec 1 '10 at 3:24
    
+1 to factory pattern. That is no Shape class responsibility fopr object creation –  Petro Semeniuk Dec 1 '10 at 3:28
    
@Karl: The basic difference between FactoryMethod and AbstractFactory is that the FactoryMethod is called from inside the class hierarchy (the abstract base class), whereas the AbstractFactory is used from the outside. (The GoFBook tries to hint at this fact by saying that FactoryMethod is "class based", whereas AbstractFactory is "object based".) - From JavaRanch FAQs. –  Adeel Ansari Dec 1 '10 at 3:30
    
Thanks, I'll take a look at Factories. –  David Oliver Dec 1 '10 at 3:33
    
+1 this separation of concerns is what a Factory is meant for –  orangepips Dec 1 '10 at 3:46

// 2. I want to hide this method. It should only be callable from superclass Shape

You can make the Shape method final in order to lock down the implementation. Even your overloaded method that returns a subclass type (Triangle in your example) would be flagged by the compiler.

public static final Shape createShapeFromXML(String xml) { ... }

EDIT:

in response to the conversation in the comments, for evidence I provide the following:

public class Shape {
   public static final Shape createShapeFromXML(String xml) {
      if (xml.equals("Triangle")) {//removed parse for demo compliation
         return Triangle.createShapeFromXML(xml);
      } else {
         return new Shape();
      }
   }
}

public class Triangle extends Shape{
   public static Triangle createShapeFromXML(String xml) {
      return new Triangle();
   }
} 

trying to compile the above will result in a compiler error:

mybox:src akf$ javac Triangle.java
Triangle.java:3: createShapeFromXML(java.lang.String) in Triangle cannot override createShapeFromXML(java.lang.String) in Shape; overridden method is static final
     public static Triangle createShapeFromXML(String xml) {
                                ^
1 error

This can be explained using the JLS by referencing two sections:

from 8.4.6.2 Hiding (by Class Methods):

If a class declares a static method, then the declaration of that method is said to hide any and all methods with the same signature in the superclasses and superinterfaces of the class that would otherwise be accessible to code in the class.

and then from 8.4.3.3 final Methods:

A method can be declared final to prevent subclasses from overriding or hiding it. It is a compile-time error to attempt to override or hide a final method.

Putting the two together, adding final to the signature of a static method will protect that method from being hidden by subclasses. It will enforce compile-time checking.

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Static methods can't be overridden, so final would literally do nothing. –  ColinD Dec 1 '10 at 4:14
    
It is legal, and perhaps 'hidden' would be a better term than overridden. Because final prohibits methods with the same signatures to be implemented in subclasses, the compiler will flag the method hiding as well. –  akf Dec 1 '10 at 4:18
    
@afk: It won't, actually. –  ColinD Dec 1 '10 at 4:21
    
hmmm. Have you tried it? –  akf Dec 1 '10 at 4:35
    
@akf: Yes. final prevents overriding a method in a subclass, but as I said... static methods cannot be overridden, so final is meaningless on them. –  ColinD Dec 1 '10 at 5:04

To make your code compile you need to declare public static Shape createShapeFromXML(String xml) in the Triangle class.


public class Shape {

    public static void main(String[] args) {
            String xml = "Triangle";
            Shape s = Shape.createShapeFromXML(xml);
            System.out.println(s.toString());
    }

    public static Shape createShapeFromXML(String xml) {
       Shape aShape = null;

       if (xml.equals("Triangle")) {
         aShape = Triangle.createShapeFromXML(xml);
       }
       return aShape;
     }
 }

class Triangle extends Shape {

    public static Shape createShapeFromXML(String xml) {
         return new Triangle();
    }

    @Override
    public String toString() {
       return "Triangle";
    }
 }


The System.out.println(s.toString()); in the main method outputs "Triangle", this proves that a Triangle shape is being created.

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