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I encountered the following Ruby code:

class MyClass
    attr_accessor :items
    ...
    def each
        @items.each{|item| yield item}
    end
    ...
end

What does the each method do? In particular, I don't understand what yield does.

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Yields......... –  Boris Stitnicky Nov 1 at 11:44

5 Answers 5

up vote 21 down vote accepted

This is an example fleshing out your sample code:

class MyClass
  attr_accessor :items

  def initialize(ary=[])
    @items = ary
  end

  def each
    @items.each do |item| 
      yield item
    end
  end
end

my_class = MyClass.new(%w[a b c d])
my_class.each do |y|
  puts y
end
# >> a
# >> b
# >> c
# >> d

each loops over a collection. In this case it's looping over each item in the @items array, initialized/created when I did the new(%w[a b c d]) statement.

yield item in the MyClass.each method passes item to the block attached to my_class.each. The item being yielded is assigned to the local y.

Does that help?

Now, here's a bit more about how each works. Using the same class definition, here's some code:

my_class = MyClass.new(%w[a b c d])

# This points to the `each` Enumerator/method of the @items array in your instance via
#  the accessor you defined, not the method "each" you've defined.
my_class_iterator = my_class.items.each # => #<Enumerator: ["a", "b", "c", "d"]:each>

# get the next item on the array
my_class_iterator.next # => "a"

# get the next item on the array
my_class_iterator.next # => "b"

# get the next item on the array
my_class_iterator.next # => "c"

# get the next item on the array
my_class_iterator.next # => "d"

# get the next item on the array
my_class_iterator.next # => 
# ~> -:21:in `next': iteration reached an end (StopIteration)
# ~>    from -:21:in `<main>'

Notice that on the last next the iterator fell off the end of the array. This is the potential pitfall for NOT using a block because if you don't know how many elements are in the array you can ask for too many items and get an exception.

Using each with a block will iterate over the @items receiver and stop when it reaches the last item, avoiding the error, and keeping things nice and clean.

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Thank you very much! –  Misha Moroshko Dec 1 '10 at 11:31

A Ruby method that receives a code block invokes it by calling it with the yield keyword. It can be used to iterate over a list but it is not a iterator like what you find in other some other languages.

Here is a good explanation that explains it better than I would ever be able to.

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Thank you for the link! –  Misha Moroshko Dec 1 '10 at 11:31
1  
fwiw - I found this page to give a simpler explanation of {code}yield{code} specifically –  JoeyC Oct 31 '13 at 6:46
    
The link doesn't work :( –  ashish173 Dec 3 at 20:45

When you write a method that takes a block, you can use the yield keyword to execute the block.

As an example, each could have been implemented in the Array class like this:

class Array
  def each
    i = 0
    while i < self.size
      yield( self[i] )
      i = i + 1
    end
  end
end

MyClass#each takes a block. It executes that block once for each item in the instance's items array, passing the current item as an argument.

It might be used like this:

instance = MyClass.new
instance.items = [1, 2, 3, 4, 5]
instance.each do |item|
  puts item
end
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Thank you very much! –  Misha Moroshko Dec 1 '10 at 11:32

The net effect is that calling .each on an instance of MyClass is the same as calling .each on the .items of that instance.

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As cpm said its taking the block and executing it

def my_method
  yield
end


my_method do
  puts "Testing yield"
end

Testing yield
=> nil 
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