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<root>
  <parent>
    <child>
     <name>John</name>
    </child>
    <child>
      <name>Ben</name>
    </child>
  </parent>
  <parent>
    <child>
     <name>John</name>
    </child>
    <child>
     <name>Mark</name>
    </child>
    <child>
      <name>Luke</name>
    </child>
 </parent>
</root>

I want unique child nodes only i.e. only one child node if there is more than one with the same name.

Such as:

John Ben Mark Luke

I have tried:

<xsl:for-each select="parent">
  <xsl:for-each select="child[name != preceding::name]">
    <xsl:value-of select="name"/>
  </xsl:for-each>
</xsl:for-each>

But I get:

Ben Mark Luke

?!

share|improve this question
    
Good question, +1. See my answer for an explanation and for a correct solution. :) –  Dimitre Novatchev Dec 1 '10 at 7:35

1 Answer 1

up vote 7 down vote accepted

Your problem is that you are using the != operator for comparison between a value and a node-set.

This is wrong -- always avoid using the != operator and always use the not() function and the = operator when one of the operands in the comparison is a node-set.

Below is a correct solution:

<xsl:stylesheet version="1.0"
 xmlns:xsl="http://www.w3.org/1999/XSL/Transform">
 <xsl:output omit-xml-declaration="yes" indent="yes"/>
 <xsl:strip-space elements="*"/>

 <xsl:template match="/*">
    <xsl:for-each select="parent">
      <xsl:for-each select="child[not(name = preceding::name)]">
        <xsl:value-of select="concat(name, ' ')"/>
      </xsl:for-each>
    </xsl:for-each>
 </xsl:template>
</xsl:stylesheet>

when this transformation is applied on the provided XML document:

<root>
  <parent>
    <child>
     <name>John</name>
    </child>
    <child>
      <name>Ben</name>
    </child>
  </parent>
  <parent>
    <child>
     <name>John</name>
    </child>
    <child>
     <name>Mark</name>
    </child>
    <child>
      <name>Luke</name>
    </child>
 </parent>
</root>

the wanted, correct result is produced:

John Ben Mark Luke 

Explanation: Here is how the W3C XPath 1.0 spec defines the semantics of the != operator:

"If one object to be compared is a node-set and the other is a string, then the comparison will be true if and only if there is a node in the node-set such that the result of performing the comparison on the string-value of the node and the other string is true."

This means that

's' != node-set

is always true if there is even only one node in node-set that isn't equal to 's'.

This isn't the semantics that is wanted.

On the other side,

not('s' = node-set()) 

is true only only if there isn't a node in node-set that is equal to 's'.

This is exactly the wanted comparison.

Do note: The grouping technique you have chosen is O(N^2) and should only be used on very small sets of values to be dedupped. If efficiency is needed, by all means use the Muenchian method for grouping (discussing or demo-ing this falls outside the scope of this question).

share|improve this answer
1  
Great explanation. +1 –  Daniel Haley Dec 1 '10 at 7:38
    
This works for small documents, but please note that it relies on comparing every single node to all nodes preceding it. If your document is an actual, lengthy document, the time to execute this will rise drastically. –  LaustN Dec 1 '10 at 13:39
    
@LaustN: Of course, I am not supporting this O(N^2) technique, just answering the concrete question. When efficiency is required, use the Muenchian method. I just edited my answer with a final note saying this. –  Dimitre Novatchev Dec 1 '10 at 13:53
    
the document is v. small –  markmnl Dec 7 '10 at 15:40
    
@Mrk-Mnl: For small documents this is OK. If you prefer to know and use two different methods for grouping (one for small and one for big documents) this is OK. Most people prefer to actively use only one grouping method, regardless of document size -- the Muenchian method for grouping. –  Dimitre Novatchev Dec 7 '10 at 20:51

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