Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Morning mr. Stackoverflow.

Is it possible to .animate between 2 img ? Like, change the img src & fade to the new img src?

Html

<img class="classimg" src="images/example.png" />

My pseudo jquery/javascript code:

On Click
    Animate .classimg height 50 width 100 opacity 1, 600
    Animate .classimg height 200 width 450, 400
    Animate .classimg change img src to url(images/example_with_green.png), 700

Thank you for your affort - and a good 1st dec!

share|improve this question
add comment

3 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

As Robert said what you can do is this:

<script type="text/javascript">

        $(function () {
            // find the div.fade elements and hook the hover event
            $('div.fade').hover(function() {
                // on hovering over find the element we want to fade *up*
                var fade = $('> div', this);

                // if the element is currently being animated (to fadeOut)...
                if (fade.is(':animated')) {
                    // ...stop the current animation, and fade it to 1 from current position
                    fade.stop().fadeTo(1000, 1);
                } else {
                    fade.fadeIn(1000);
                }
            }, function () {
                var fade = $('> div', this);
                if (fade.is(':animated')) {
                    fade.stop().fadeTo(1000, 0);
                } else {
                    fade.fadeOut(1000);
                }
            });
        });

    </script>

And the HTML:

    <div class="fade">
            <img src="logo.png" alt="Who we are" />
            <div>
                <img src="logoalt.png" alt="Who we are" />
    </div>
</div>
share|improve this answer
    
What about the CSS on this? Wouldn't '.fade > div' need to be "display: none; position: relative; opacity: 0" in order for them to animate over top of each other? –  bafromca Apr 18 '12 at 19:16
add comment

This is not possible with just a single HTML img element. What you can do is animate/fade to overlaid images. Fade one in and the other one out.

jQuery animate() function can only animate dimensional CSS styles. To also allow colour animations, you have to use jQuery UI effects. But nothing like two image sources is supported out of the box.

Put all images in the same DIV container like this:

<div style="position:relative;">
    <img src="..." style="position:absolute;" />
    <img src="..." style="position:absolute;display:none;" />
    <img src="..." style="position:absolute;display:none;" />
    <img src="..." style="position:absolute;display:none;" />
    <img src="..." style="position:absolute;display:none;" />
</div>

and then cycle through these images and do animations as appropriate.

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you for the description. I saw some issuese that JQuery cant naturaly animate the background-color, borders - are their other things that JQuery do not native support? . ) –  Tomkay Dec 1 '10 at 8:10
    
@Mr. Freeman: That's why I said you should use jQuery UI animations in these special animations. jQuery animate() animated dimensional styles only. border-width being one of them. But not border-color of course. –  Robert Koritnik Dec 1 '10 at 8:34
add comment

You could make a single background (containing both images), and animate the background position. Here's the demo (and the article here, if you're interested).

share|improve this answer
    
Using sprites won't allow fading, like the OP asked. –  Valentin Flachsel Dec 1 '10 at 8:05
1  
with fade? I don't think so. Fades in the example you linked are just gradients. Impossible to do with two images 300px size. You would have to create all frames of fade animation. The idea is cool, but not for this purpose. –  naugtur Dec 1 '10 at 8:14
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.