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is it possible to create python executable targeted for linux, from mac os x?

PyInstaller seems to be at an early stage, and I don't know much else.

Thanks

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up vote 0 down vote accepted

There is tool that can be run on single OS and make you executables for different OSes. You will need to do the compilation for every OS on a (virtual)machine that have it installed. Fox OS X you can check py2app in http://undefined.org/python/

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py2app "converts python scripts into executable Mac OS X applications". The OP wants to make linux executables. – martineau Dec 1 '10 at 9:12
    
my mistake, I have misunderstood the question, but he will still need a linux (virtual)machine – Ilian Iliev Dec 1 '10 at 9:34

Do you really need a standalone executable? For most Linux distributions, the easier and more common way to distribute Python software is to just distribute the source.

Every major Linux distribution already has Python installed, and some have it installed by default.

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I am using additional modules not included within the standard installation. I am not sure if I am allowed to install them – Bob Dec 1 '10 at 8:24
    
You could include the modules with the source code. That in itself is not a good reason to make an executable. – mgiuca Dec 1 '10 at 8:35
1  
@Banana: "additional modules" and "your application" are hard to distinguish. The "additional modules" just make your application larger. If you can install your application, you can install these additional modules as part of it. – S.Lott Dec 1 '10 at 11:05

Dont know if available for OS X but take a look at cx_freeze

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