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I recently ran across the problem, that I wanted a function to work on both doubles and integers and wondered, why there is no common interface for all number types (containing arithmetic operators and comparisons).

It would make writing functions like Math.Min (which exist in a gazillion overloads) way more convinient.

Would introducing an additional interface be a breaking change?

Edit: I think about using this like

public T Add<T>(T a, T b) where T: INumber
{
    return a+b;
}

or

public T Range<T>(T x, T min, T max) where T:INumber
{
    return Max(x, Min(x, max), min);
}
share|improve this question
    
@Saeed: Thats the point. =) My Add method up there is just a simple example. In my case, I am doing some basic statistical analysis on a given array of numbers, and dont care if they are int, double, decimal or BigIntegers, as long as I can add them. (and don't have to write this methods in many overloads) – Jens Dec 1 '10 at 8:41
up vote 5 down vote accepted

If you want to do such kind of "generic" arithmetics your option in a strongly-typed language such as C# are quite limited. Marc Gravell described the problem as follows:

.NET 2.0 introduced generics into the .NET world, which opened the door for many elegant solutions to existing problems. Generic constraints can be used to restrict the type-arguments to known interfaces etc, to ensure access to functionality - or for simple equality/inequality tests the Comparer<T>.Default and EqualityComparer<T>.Default singletons implement IComparer<T> and IEqualityComparer<T> respectively (allowing us to sort elements for instance, without having to know anything about the "T" in question).

With all this, though, there is still a big gap when it comes to operators. Because operators are declared as static methods, there is no IMath<T> or similar equivalent interface that all the numeric types implement; and indeed, the flexibility of operators would make this very hard to do in a meaningful way. Worse: many of the operators on primitive types don't even exist as operators; instead there are direct IL methods. To make the situation even more complex, Nullable<> demands the concept of "lifted operators", where the inner "T" describes the operators applicable to the nullable type - but this is implemented as a language feature, and is not provided by the runtime (making reflection even more fun).

However, C# 4.0 introduced the dynamic keyword which you can use to choose the correct overload at runtime:

using System;

public class Program
{
    static dynamic Min(dynamic a, dynamic b)
    {
        return Math.Min(a, b);        
    }

    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        int i = Min(3, 4);
        double d = Min(3.0, 4.0);
    }
}

You should be aware that this removes type-safety and you might get exceptions at runtime if the dynamic runtime cannot find a suitable overload to call, e.g. because you mixed types.

If you want to get type-safety you might want to have a look at the classes available in the MiscUtil library providing generic operators for basic operations.

Please note that if you are only after specific operations you actually might use the interfaces that the built-in types already implement. For example, a type-safe generic Min function could look like this:

public static T Min<T>(params T[] values) where T : IComparable<T>
{
    T min = values[0];
    foreach (var item in values.Skip(1))
    {
        if (item.CompareTo(min) < 0)
            min = item;
    }
    return min;
}
share|improve this answer
    
Your generalization is good approach, but it doesn't support for example specific Add method, It just useful for Comparable actions, not for all possible actions in numbers, and dynamic is not good approach because of its speed. – Saeed Amiri Dec 1 '10 at 10:18

i.e How to do 2 + 2.35? return 4 or 4.35 or 4.349999? how interface understand what's the appropriated output? You can write your extension method and use overloading to solve this for your problem, but if we want to have interface for all purpose how long will be interface size and finding useful function is difficult, Also interface adds some overhead and numbers are usually basis of calculation so need fast way.

I think write an extension class is better in your case:

public static class ExtensionNumbers
{
    public static T Range<T>(this T input, T min, T max) where T : class 
    {
        return input.Max(input.Min(max), min);
    }

    public static T Min<T>(this T input, params T[] param) where T : class
    {
        return null;
    }

    private static T Max<T>(this T input, params T[] number) where T : class 
    {
        return null;
    }      

}

I used where T : class just to be compile

share|improve this answer
    
I does not need to in my understanding. See my edited question. T there is either int, or double, but not both, isn't it? – Jens Dec 1 '10 at 8:33
    
I think all operators are available for all numbers, and adding interface just adds some overhead, interface is usefull for managing something numbers are managed in developer mind before learning programming. – Saeed Amiri Dec 1 '10 at 8:44
    
Ahh.. I see what you mean now... and interface like Public INumber Add(INumber a, INumber b); would indeed lead to the problem you describe... let me think about that =) – Jens Dec 1 '10 at 9:05
    
How would those extension methods be used? They won't be available on the built-in types such as int or double. – Dirk Vollmar Dec 1 '10 at 9:46
    
@0xA3, I didn't write full code, see my suggestion I wrote use overloading and I write T for generalizing not for detail, aka you can write public static int Min<int>(this int input, params int[] param) and public static double Min<double>(this double input, params double[] param) instead of using inheritance and boxing. – Saeed Amiri Dec 1 '10 at 10:13

Well, you can't define operators in interfaces anyway and structs (although they support interfaces) wouldn't work well through interface implementations, as this would require boxing and unboxing, which of course would be a big performance hit when performing mathmatical operations purely through interface implementations.

I would also highlight that when you cast a struct to its interface, the result object is a reference type (a boxed object) which you perform operations on, not the original struct itself:

interface IDoSomething
{
  void DoSomething();
}

struct MyStruct : IDoSomething
{
  public MyStruct(int age)
  {
    this.Age = age;
  }

  public int Age;

  pubblic void DoSomething()
  {
    Age++;
  }
}

public void DoSomething(IDoSomething something)
{
  something.DoSomething();
} 

When I pass in my instance of my struct, its boxed (becomes a reference type) which I perform my DoSomething operation on, but my original instance of my struct will not change.

share|improve this answer
    
It will actually work, as long as you 'cast' to an interface, the struct will be boxed. – leppie Dec 1 '10 at 8:38
    
See my answer, for what I mean. – leppie Dec 1 '10 at 8:40
    
I'm casting to an interface when I call the DoSomething(ISomething something) method. – Matthew Abbott Dec 1 '10 at 8:40
    
You actually update a temporary value in that case, but it is subsequently discarded. – leppie Dec 1 '10 at 8:43
    
@leppie lol, that's the issue; we aren't actually performing the operation on the original struct but the temporary boxed object – Matthew Abbott Dec 1 '10 at 8:45

Going with Matthew's answer, do notice the difference between the 3 invocations.

void DoSomething(ref MyStruct something)
{
  something.DoSomething();
} 

static void Main(string[] args)
{
  var s = new MyStruct(10);
  var i = (IDoSomething)s;

  DoSomething(s); // will not modify s
  DoSomething(i); // will modify i
  DoSomething(ref s); // will modify s, but with no reassignment

}
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks! I've never thought of that. Numeric types already implement a number of interfaces. Is my "proposed" INumber any different from them or does this problem exist today? – Jens Dec 1 '10 at 8:54

It isn't as simple as introducing an interface, as the operators available are different per type, and are not always even homogeneous (i.e. DateTime + TimeSpan => DateTime, DateTime - DateTime => TimeSpan).

At the techincal level, there may be lot of boxing etc involved here, plus regular operators are static.

Actually, for Min / Max, Comparer<T>.Default.Compare(x,y) does pretty much everything you would hope.

For other operators: in .NET 4.0 dynamic is of great help here:

T x = ..., y = ...;
T sum = (dynamic)x + (dynamic)y;

but otherwise "MiscUtil" has generic support for operators via the Operator class, i.e.

T x = ..., y = ...;
T sum = Operator.Add(x, y); // actually Add<T>
share|improve this answer

The problem is that in the architecture of how numbers are stored different number types are treated fundimentaly differently. For starters your verbiage is wrong and interfaces won't work, but what I think your getting at is you want numerics to be loosely typed.

Just for a start as to why you wouldn't want to do this consider Integer types are a one to one mapping on the range of values they can represent while floating point types have a persision and and exponent component since there are infantly many floating point numbers. The language developers would have to make some very fundamental and potentially error causing assumptions in the language design.

Take a look at this article about floating point math for more info.

share|improve this answer
1  
Nope, I don't want numbers loosly typed. That would be horrible. =) I just don't want to write my Range method (Range(x,min,max) = Max(Min(x,max),min)) for all 16 or so numeric types. – Jens Dec 1 '10 at 8:37

That's the main characteristic of a "strongly-typed language". This is something that avoids billions of mistakes a minute. Of course we want int to be totally different as double.

share|improve this answer
1  
Having different classes implement a common interface still leaves everything strongly type. C# uses a lot of interfaces in many places. My question is more of: Why is this obvious one missing? – Jens Dec 1 '10 at 8:35
    
As you answered yourself, templates allow you to do the same thing on similar objects. If Math.Min is so overloaded, it is just to avoid using templates, and maybe set micro-optimization for special types. – Aurélien Ribon Dec 1 '10 at 8:47
1  
Note that C# doesn't have templates. It has generics, which is something different. – Dirk Vollmar Dec 1 '10 at 9:12

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