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String p="1,234";
Double d=Double.valueOf(p); 
System.out.println(d);

return a error.

what the besy way to get 1.234 ?

better than: p=p.replaceAll(",",".");

thanks a lot :)

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3  
In my experience, replaceAll(), as you suggested, is the best way to do this. It doesn't depend on the current locale, it's simple, and it works. –  Joonas Pulakka Dec 1 '10 at 11:07

6 Answers 6

up vote 48 down vote accepted

Use java.text.NumberFormat:

    NumberFormat format = NumberFormat.getInstance(Locale.FRANCE);
    Number number = format.parse("1,234");
    double d = number.doubleValue();
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3  
This only works if the current default locale happens to use a comma as a decimal separator. –  Joonas Pulakka Dec 1 '10 at 11:05
3  
To further mess things up, some locales use comma as a thousands separator, in which case "1,234" would parse to 1234.0 instead of throwing an error. –  Joonas Pulakka Dec 1 '10 at 11:11
    
Some European locales such as FRANCE, GERMANY and ITALY use comma as a decimal separator, so you could explicitly use them, rather than relying on the default. –  dogbane Dec 1 '10 at 11:14
3  
The problem with NumberFormat is that it will silently ignore invalid characters. So if you try to parse "1,23abc" it will happily return 1.23 without indicating to you that the passed-in String contained non-parsable characters. In some situations that might actually be desirable, but I don't think it's usually the desired behavior. –  E-Riz Jan 17 '13 at 19:37
    
for TURKEY, you should use NumberFormat.getInstance(new Locale(tr_TR)) –  Günay Gültekin Jul 27 '13 at 9:45

You can use this (the French locale has , for decimal separator)

NumberFormat nf = NumberFormat.getInstance(Locale.FRANCE);
nf.parse(p);

Or you can use java.text.DecimalFormat and set the appropriate symbols:

DecimalFormat df = new DecimalFormat();
DecimalFormatSymbols symbols = new DecimalFormatSymbols();
symbols.setDecimalSeparator(',');
symbols.setGroupingSeparator(' ');
df.setDecimalFormatSymbols(symbols);
df.parse(p);
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As E-Riz points out, NumberFormat.parse(String) parse "1,23abc" as 1.23. To take the entire input we can use:

public double parseDecimal(String input) throws NullPointerException, ParseException{
  if(input == null){
    throw new NullPointerException();
  }

  input = input.trim();

  NumberFormat numberFormat = NumberFormat.getNumberInstance(Locale.FRANCE);
  ParsePosition parsePosition = new ParsePosition(0);
  Number number = numberFormat.parse(input, parsePosition);

  if(parsePosition.getIndex() != input.length()){
    throw new ParseException("Invalid input", parsePosition.getIndex());
  }

  return number.doubleValue();
}
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You of course need to use the correct locale. This question will help.

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This is the static method I use in my own code:

public static double sGetDecimalStringAnyLocaleAsDouble (String value) {

    Locale theLocale = Locale.getDefault();
    NumberFormat numberFormat = DecimalFormat.getInstance(theLocale);
    Number theNumber;
    try {
        theNumber = numberFormat.parse(value);
        return theNumber.doubleValue();
    } catch (ParseException e) {
        SKLogger.sAssert(SKCommon.class,  false);

        String valueWithDot = value.replaceAll(",",".");
        return Double.valueOf(valueWithDot);
    }
}
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If you don't know the correct Locale and the string can have a thousand separator this could be a last resort:

    doubleStrIn = doubleStrIn.replaceAll("[^\\d,\\.]++", "");
    if (doubleStrIn.matches(".+\\.\\d+,\\d+$"))
        return Double.parseDouble(doubleStrIn.replaceAll("\\.", "").replaceAll(",", "."));
    if (doubleStrIn.matches(".+,\\d+\\.\\d+$"))
        return Double.parseDouble(doubleStrIn.replaceAll(",", ""));
    return Double.parseDouble(doubleStrIn.replaceAll(",", "."));

Be aware: this will happily parse strings like "R 1 52.43,2" to "15243.2".

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