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I'm now trying to improve a winform application's performance by make it multi-threaded. Currently the class looks like:

public class MainClass
{
   List<DataItem> data; //thousands of DataItem, but each is independent

   //and a lot of non-thread-safe variables here,variable1 variable2 ...

   public void Go()
   {
      data.ForEach(item => DealWithDataItem(item));
   }

   public void DealWithDataItem(DataItem item)
   {
      //costs really long time here
      Step1(item);
      Step2(item); //and a lot of StepN(item)
   }

   public void StepN(DataItem item)
   {
      //variable1 = blabla
      //variable2 = blabla ..etc
   }
}

I want to use ThreadPool for each DataItem.

data.ForEach(item => ThreadPool.QueueUserWorkItem( s => DealWithDataItem(item) ));

But so many non-thread-safe variables! I can't declare them in some method, because it's shared between StepN methods. And it's quite hard to make them all thread-safe! Am I doing anything wrong? Any good solutions? Thanks!

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isn't backgroundworker suffice? –  Srinivas Reddy Thatiparthy Dec 1 '10 at 11:18
1  
It really depends on what you do with your variables1..n do they sum values? Do you read? Write? You need to be much more specific about the usage of those variables. There are different solutions for different usage patterns. –  Albin Sunnanbo Dec 1 '10 at 11:30
    
Don't quite understand. Is MainClass some kind of monitor for the overall progress of dealing with all DataItem progress (so you need them as a state for MainClass). If not, consider creating separate objects for each of your work. –  Przemek Kryger Dec 1 '10 at 11:33
1  
Before you go any further with this, it's important to know this: what makes Step1 and Step2 really slow? What sort of work are they doing? A lot of things that run slowly do so because they depend on slow things like the disk or network. Splitting the work across multiple threads often doesn't help in these scenarios. In general, the nature of the work is important when working out how to parallelize work - the bits you've elided with "blabla ..etc" are actually the most important bits - you've hidden the parts people need to see to answer your question. –  Ian Griffiths Dec 1 '10 at 11:41
    
You say the variables are shared between the StepN methods, but are they shared between different threads? If not, then the answers you’ve received will help, but if they are, then you have a bigger problem... –  Timwi Feb 26 '11 at 18:37

4 Answers 4

Try using ParallelEnumerable.AsParallel.

data.AsParallel.ForEach(DoWork);

It will automatically create threads depending on amount of processors / cores. The only problem, that it's included in Framework 4.0. More info about PLINQ. (And as andras commented: for framwork 3.5 it is available as stand-alone Reactive Extensions (Rx))

UPD: as 0xA3 said, refactoring code, making each item have it's own calc variables is strongly recommended. I suggest you to extract calculation logics to DataItem

Or create special class like "Calculator", which would be do all the work, so DataItem would only store data, and logics of calculations would be contained in Calculator class.

data.AsParallel.ForEach(x=> new Calculator().DoWork(x));

where Calculator class is something like this

class Calculator
{
   // variables here

  void DoWork(DataItem item)
  {
     Step1(item);
     Step2(item);
     // ...
     // StepN(item);
  }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Parallel.ForEach and many other things can be found for .NET 3.5 in the Rx Library. codeblog.theg2.net/2010/02/… –  Andras Vass Dec 1 '10 at 21:20
    
@andras Thanks, will update answer –  The_Smallest Dec 1 '10 at 21:23

Probably the best way would be to refactor your code, so that you get rid of all that fields shared between the different data items.

Change (or subclass) the DataItem class to contain all the relevant data and methods for manipulating a dataItem, so that your code changes to something like this:

public void DealWithDataItem(DataItem item)
{
    item.Step1(); // does not change the state of `this` 
                  // and only changes variables that are private to `item`
    item.Step2(); // and a lot of StepN(item)
}
share|improve this answer

Since each DataItem is independent, move the work into a new DataItem worker method, and let each instance deal with itself:

public class MainClass
{
    List<DataItem> data; //thousands of DataItem, but each is independent

    public void Go()
    {
        data.ForEach(item => ThreadPool.QueueUserWorkItem(s => s.DealWithSelf()));
    }
}

public class DataItem
{
    //and a lot of non-thread-safe variables here,variable1 variable2 ...

    void DealWithSelf()
    {
        //costs really long time here
        Step1(item);
        Step2(item); //and a lot of StepN(item)
    }

    public void StepN(DataItem item)
    {
        //variable1 = blabla
        //variable2 = blabla ..etc
    }
}
share|improve this answer

Is MainClass in your GUI thread? You should not be doing any data processing in your GUI thread; run MainClass in a separate thread.

How to do this? That depends entirely on the blabla stuff you have not shown us. Does MainClass need to return a result? Use BeginInvoke/EndInvoke. Do you need to update the GUI? Use BackgroundWorker. If you want a better answer you will have to give us more information.

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