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We all know this is illegal and will throw a ConcurrentModificationException:

for (Item i : theList) {
 if (i.num == 123)
  foo(i); // foo modifies theList
}

But what about this?

for (Item i : theList) {
 if (i.num == 123) {
  foo(i); // foo modifies theList
  break;
 }
}

Because the loop is broken before theLists's iterator's next is called, there is no ConcurrentModificationException. But does that make it legal?

share|improve this question
    
The first one is not illegal - foo doesn't change list but the properties of one item from the list at most. foo(theList) would have a chance to do illegal structural changes to the list. –  Andreas_D Dec 1 '10 at 11:48
    
Actually it does change the list, it removes i. –  Bart van Heukelom Dec 1 '10 at 12:19
    
Show us the code for foo. –  Don Roby Dec 1 '10 at 13:25
    
It's too complex and deep to completely paste here. Just assume that somewhere down the line it results in theList.remove(i) being called. –  Bart van Heukelom Dec 1 '10 at 15:12

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

After thinking about it some more, I concluded that it has to be. The "solution" would be

for (Item i : theList) {
 if (i.num == 123) {
  theI = i;
  break;
 }
}
foo(theI);  // foo modifies theList

But in terms of how often next is called, that's exactly the same.

share|improve this answer
    
Again, you don't change "the list" (theList) but one element of the list which is allowed. –  Andreas_D Dec 1 '10 at 11:49

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