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I am working on socket chat application, i.e I want to chat with multiple clients at a time. I have written the folllowing program. The server accepts multiple clients, but I am able to chat with only latest client. I am not able chat with previous client, can someone explain to me why?

/* tcpserver.c */

#include <sys/types.h>
#include <sys/socket.h>
#include <netinet/in.h>
#include <arpa/inet.h>
#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <unistd.h>
#include <errno.h>
#include <string.h>
#include <pthread.h>

void *thread(int *);

int main()
{
        int sock, connected, true = 1,n=1; 
    pthread_t tid;
        struct sockaddr_in server_addr,client_addr;   
        int sin_size;

        if ((sock = socket(AF_INET, SOCK_STREAM, 0)) == -1) {
            perror("Socket");
            exit(1);
        }

        if (setsockopt(sock,SOL_SOCKET,SO_REUSEADDR,&true,sizeof(int)) == -1) {
            perror("Setsockopt");
            exit(1);
        }

        server_addr.sin_family = AF_INET;        
        server_addr.sin_port = htons(5000);    
        server_addr.sin_addr.s_addr = INADDR_ANY;
        bzero(&(server_addr.sin_zero),8);

        if (bind(sock, (struct sockaddr *)&server_addr, sizeof(struct sockaddr))
                                                                       == -1) {
            perror("Unable to bind");
            exit(1);
        }

        if (listen(sock, 5) == -1) {
            perror("Listen");
            exit(1);
        }

    printf("\nTCPServer Waiting for client on port 5000");
        fflush(stdout);


        while(n<=5)
        { 

            sin_size = sizeof(struct sockaddr_in);

            connected = accept(sock, (struct sockaddr *)&client_addr,&sin_size);

            printf("\n I got a connection from (%s , %d)",
                   inet_ntoa(client_addr.sin_addr),ntohs(client_addr.sin_port));
        pthread_create(&tid,NULL,thread,&connected);
        n++;
    }

      close(sock);
      return 0;
}


void *thread(int *nfd)
{
        char send_data [1024] , recv_data[1024];      
        int bytes_recieved;   
        while (1)
            {
              printf("\n SEND (q or Q to quit) : ");
              gets(send_data);

              if (strcmp(send_data , "q") == 0 || strcmp(send_data , "Q") == 0)
              {
                send(*nfd, send_data,strlen(send_data), 0);
                close(nfd);
                break;
              }

              else
                 send(*nfd, send_data,strlen(send_data), 0); 

              bytes_recieved = recv(*nfd,recv_data,1024,0);

              recv_data[bytes_recieved] = '\0';

              if (strcmp(recv_data , "q") == 0 || strcmp(recv_data , "Q") == 0)
              {
                close(*nfd);
                break;
              }

              else
              printf("\n RECIEVED DATA = %s " , recv_data);
              fflush(stdout);
            }

}







/* tcpclient.c */

#include <sys/socket.h>
#include <sys/types.h>
#include <netinet/in.h>
#include <netdb.h>
#include <stdio.h>
#include <string.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <unistd.h>
#include <errno.h>


int main()

{

        int sock, bytes_recieved; 
        char send_data[1024],recv_data[1024];
        struct hostent *host;
        struct sockaddr_in server_addr; 

        host = gethostbyname("127.0.0.1");

        if ((sock = socket(AF_INET, SOCK_STREAM, 0)) == -1) {
            perror("Socket");
            exit(1);
        }

        server_addr.sin_family = AF_INET;    
        server_addr.sin_port = htons(5000);  
        server_addr.sin_addr = *((struct in_addr *)host->h_addr);
        bzero(&(server_addr.sin_zero),8);

        if (connect(sock, (struct sockaddr *)&server_addr,
                    sizeof(struct sockaddr)) == -1)
        {
            perror("Connect");
            exit(1);
        }

        while(1)
        {

          bytes_recieved=recv(sock,recv_data,1024,0);
          recv_data[bytes_recieved] = '\0';

          if (strcmp(recv_data , "q") == 0 || strcmp(recv_data , "Q") == 0)
          {
           close(sock);
           break;
          }

          else
           printf("\nRecieved data = %s " , recv_data);

           printf("\nSEND (q or Q to quit) : ");
           gets(send_data);

          if (strcmp(send_data , "q") != 0 && strcmp(send_data , "Q") != 0)
           send(sock,send_data,strlen(send_data), 0);

          else
          {
           send(sock,send_data,strlen(send_data), 0);  
           close(sock);
           break;
          }

        }  
return 0;
}
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3 Answers 3

Other post will help you debug the current error. This advice will hopefully save you time and patience if you decide to expand the project instead of a basic server - client model.

The advice is: Don't use threads. Poll() takes a lot of resources. Use select().

Threads should be used when you really need to use them. John Ousterhout illustrated this a long time ago and for some reason I always remember it when people are lost debugging basic thread behaviour.

alt text

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This is a trick question, right?

You're passing the address of "connected" to the thread, not the value. As soon as a new connection comes in the value gets overwritten and you end up with two threads talking to the same connection.

Incidentally, why are you using multi-threading? poll() is a better solution. You should easily be able to build a server that handles multiple clients with a single thread. It really isn't difficult.

Also if you want a true multi-person chat application, look into multi-casting. It means you only need to write a message once, not multiple times, once per socket. I haven't done any multi-casting myself, so can't tell you any more than that.

share|improve this answer
    
I'm trying so hard not to give you a full code review lest I hurt your feelings, but you do realise that the server won't see what any client types until it has sent something to that client? Also that when you type you have multiple threads (potentially) all reading from stdin simultaneously. I shudder to think what will happen there. I'm guessing that when you type something on the server end only one client (chosen according to thread scheduling) will receive the data. –  AlastairG Dec 1 '10 at 11:52
    
Also why do you put newlines at the start of the printf statements? Putting them on the end usually has the effect of flushing stdout to the terminal. –  AlastairG Dec 1 '10 at 11:53
    
May I add that indentation, placement of braces, as well as whitespace and other things are a complete mess? –  Ivo Wetzel Dec 1 '10 at 12:24

(Not really an answer:) You should only use multiple threads when you want to force a multi-processor machine into using its different processors simultaneously. For instance, when drawing a complicated mathematical graph, you may well split the graph into several parts so each processor can calculate a different part of it simulatenously. Many may disagree but if you need to multi-thread because you want to unblock I/O you're doing it wrong.

Here, you want to multi-thread simply because you want to unblock I/O. One simpler way is to fork() the server into child processes that perform a simple write of the message to their designated sockets.
A better way is multi-casting as mentioned by Alastair. But multi-casting can also be done poorly. This is a good text on it

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