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I have simple task where I need to check objects in one dictionary and if certain criteria met move to another. What I am asking if there is some good pattern where I can use language feature to achieve that. The straight approach is simple - use temporaty collection, first step determine canditates, second step do actual move. It is ok but it is not cool.

Current code

class Order
{
  public int ID;
  public bool IsReady;
}

Dictionary<int, Order> ActiveDictionary;
Dictionary<int, Order> ProcessedDictionary;

public Update()
{    
 // temporary list, uncool
 List<Order> processed = new List<Order>();


 // fist step
 foreach(Order ord in ActiveDictionary)
 {
  if(ord.IsReady)
  {
    processed.Add(ord);
  }
 }

 // ok now lets move
 foreach(Order ord in processed)
 {
  ActiveDictionary.Remove(ord.ID);
  ProcessedDictionary.Add(ord.ID, ord);
 }
}
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3 Answers 3

up vote 7 down vote accepted

There is nothing really wrong with the code you have.

As an exercise in alternatives, you could do something like...

ProcessedDictionary = ProcessedDictionary
    .Concat(
        ActiveDictionary.Where(kvp => kvp.Value.Ready)
    )
    .ToDictionary(kvp => kvp.Key, kvp => kvp.Value);

ActiveDictionary = ActiveDictionary.Where(kvp => !kvp.Value.Ready)
    .ToDictionary(kvp => kvp.Key, kvp => kvp.Value);
share|improve this answer
    
I have got a feeling you really want to use Where and not Select. I doubt the code compiles as it is now, since the input to ToDictionary is probably a bool value. –  Fredrik Mörk Dec 1 '10 at 12:27
    
@Fredrik ha! you're right, long day :) –  Rex M Dec 1 '10 at 12:27
    
...and there is my upvote :) –  Fredrik Mörk Dec 1 '10 at 12:28
    
@Fredrik still adjusting to the time difference... and your amazing early winter! –  Rex M Dec 1 '10 at 12:29
1  
@Captain yes, it would be. See my revised answer for how to handle that. –  Rex M Dec 1 '10 at 12:32

if Rex M's answer is not suitable (maybe you don't want to rebuild Dictionaries on each iteartion), then as small improvement I can suggest to replace

// temporary list, uncool
List<Order> processed = new List<Order>();

// fist step
foreach(Order ord in ActiveDictionary)
{
  if(ord.IsReady)
  {
     processed.Add(ord);
  }
}

to

var processed = ActiveDictionary.Where(x=>x.Value.Ready).ToArray();

and the rest of your code would be

foreach(var item in processed)
{
   ActiveDictionary.Remove(item.Key);
   ProcessedDictionary.Add(item.Key, item.Value);
}

UPD: As Ani commented, there is another alike solution:

var processed = ActiveDictionary.Values.Where(x=>x.Ready).ToArray();

foreach(var item in processed)
{
   ActiveDictionary.Remove(item);
   ProcessedDictionary.Add(item.Id, item);
}
share|improve this answer
    
I like this answer because the intent of the code is quite clear from reading it: "Find all elements like this and remove/add them from the dictionaries" –  mlibby Dec 1 '10 at 13:18
    
I like LINQ a lot. But sometimes it's just not the place for it. This answer is that case: old-good style with small mix of LINQ is much more readable fully-LINQ style. –  The_Smallest Dec 1 '10 at 13:22

try this

var keys = ActiveDictionary
    .Where(kv => kv.Value.Ready)
    .Select(kv => kv.Key).ToList();
keys.ForEach(k =>
        {
            ProcessedDictionary.Add(k, ActiveDictionary[k]);
            ActiveDictionary.Remove(k);
        });
share|improve this answer
    
If you don't do .Select(kv => kv.Key) then you won't need to search for value in ActiveDictionary (when you add items in Foreach). –  The_Smallest Dec 1 '10 at 12:43

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