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Why is iostream::eof inside a loop condition considered wrong?

I have the following piece of code:

ifstream f("x.txt");
string line;
while (f.good()) {
  getline(f, line);
  // Use line here.
}

But this reads the last line twice. Why does this happen and how do I fix it?

Something very similar happens with:

ifstream f("x.txt");
string line;
while (!f.eof()) {
  getline(f, line);
  // Use line here.
}
share|improve this question

marked as duplicate by FredOverflow, Xeo, sbi, R. Martinho Fernandes, Dori Nov 14 '11 at 8:29

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

    
How is this a duplicate? The other answer doesn't even mention looping with the good() function as the test. –  Jerry Jeremiah May 15 at 21:51

3 Answers 3

up vote 20 down vote accepted

You very, very rarely want to check bad, eof, and good. In particular for eof (as !stream.eof() is a common mistake), the stream currently being at EOF does not necessarily mean the last input operation failed; conversely, not being at EOF does not mean the last input was successful.

All of the stream state functions – fail, bad, eof, and good – tell you the current state of the stream rather than predicting the success of a future operation. Check the stream itself (which is equivalent to an inverted fail check) after the desired operation:

if (getline(stream, line)) {
  use(line);
}
else {
  handle_error();
}

if (stream >> foo >> bar) {
  use(foo, bar);
}
else {
  handle_error();
}

if (!(stream >> foo)) {  // operator! is overloaded for streams
  throw SomeException();
}
use(foo);

To read and process all lines:

for (std::string line; getline(stream, line);) {
  process(line);
}

Pointedly, good() is misnamed and is not equivalent to testing the stream itself (which the above examples do).

share|improve this answer
    
The part about checking eof is correct, but the suggestion to check the stream itself is a bit off. good() means none of eofbit, badbit, or failbit are set. fail() means either badbit or failbit is set. Checking the stream (either using the void* converstion, or operator !) is exactly the same as calling the fail() member function. –  KeithB Dec 1 '10 at 15:19
2  
@KeithB: You might notice I left fail out of the "should be rarely checked" group. A failed stream is what's important, and checking the stream itself is almost always more convenient than the equivalent fail(). Compare getline(stream, line) to !getline(stream, line).fail(). –  Fred Nurk Dec 1 '10 at 15:46

Just use

ifstream f("x.txt");
while (getline(f, line)) {
    // whatever
}

This is the idiomatic way to write such a loop. I've not been able to reproduce the error (on a Linux machine).

share|improve this answer
    
I've only just realised why that works: The last successful call to getline() might set eof, if the last line does not have a newline at the end. The fail bit is set only when there is an unsuccessful call to getline(). So we don't want to end the loop at eof, but we do want to end it at fail. –  Aaron McDaid May 19 '11 at 23:27
    
One more thing.. I had been doing while(f.peek() != EOF) { ... }. I think this is correct? But I'll use your answer in future. –  Aaron McDaid May 19 '11 at 23:34

It didn't read the last line twice but because it failed to read when it reached eof, your string line has the value it had previously.

That is because f is no longer "good" when it has read EOF, not when it is about to read it.

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