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My problem is pretty simple - at least I hope it is. I am try to join two tables in MySQL and the perform a WHERE statement on a concatenated field to produce a result. Here is the sample query:

SELECT a.name, b.company, concat_ws(' ', a.company, b.name) as whole_name  
FROM users as a  
INNER JOIN company as b on a.company_id = b.company_id  
HAVING whole_name LIKE '%IBM John%'  
LIMIT 25

This query seems to still be pulling from the name column and will return no results. I've tried this by doing:

SELECT a.name, b.company, concat_ws(' ', a.company, b.name) as whole_name  
FROM users as a  
INNER JOIN company as b on a.company_id = b.company_id  
WHERE concat_ws(' ', a.company, b.name) LIKE '%IBM John%'  
LIMIT 25

And it still doesn't yield any results. The data is absolutely in the table. The company for John is IBM Computer Systems. The whole_name field would return 'IBM Computer Systems John Smith' but a query on '%IBM John%' return nothing.

Any help?

Thanks, Greg

share|improve this question

Need a % between IBM and John... it's looking for "IBM John" somewhere in the text... not IBM then John somewhere further along..

share|improve this answer
    
So for each search term, you need to break it up and add an '%' symbol? Such as '%IBM% %John%'? – gregavola Dec 1 '10 at 13:58
    
% is a wildcard, you can do '%IBM%John%' and it'll do it, if you want to enforce that they are in seperate words then '%IBM% %John%' looks for IBM, then a space somewhere after, and then John somewhere after that. '%IBM%John%' would also match if "IBMJohn" (i.e lack of space) is within the text. – Ben Dec 1 '10 at 14:16

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