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in my SQL Server 2005 database I have a column RMA_Number with datatype char(10) in table RMA.

The value is an increasing number with the format RMA0002511. What is the fastest way to get the highest number to increment it on inserting?

My first approach was:

SELECT     TOP (1) RMA_Number
FROM         RMA
WHERE     (RMA_generated = 1)
ORDER BY Creation_Date DESC

But this was error-prone because it was somehow possible that a higher RMA_Number has an earlier creation date. As a workaround, sorting by the primary key works:

SELECT     TOP (1) RMA_Number
FROM         RMA
WHERE     (RMA_generated = 1)
ORDER BY idRMA DESC

But maybe this is also a possible source of error.

Logically the best way would be to ORDER BY RMA_Number DESC.

But because I was not sure if this gives always the correct result and thought that sorting a char column could get slow if the number of records increase, I chose to order by the Date column.

So,

  1. is it a good idea to order by a char(10)-column (performance and accuracy)?
  2. would it be better to SELECT MAX( RMA_Number ) FROM RMA to get the highest number(perf. and accuracy)
  3. should I stick on using the primary key to order by if the first two points are wrong or should I use an int column and format the number in the application?

EDIT:

I think I must clarify something that I haven't mentioned. The RMA_Number is not generated on every insert. So maybe there are many records without a number. Martin uses the primary key to build the number. That would be a problem, because the gaps would be too big.

Thank you in advance.

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Does it matter if gaps occasionally show up in the values? For example, would it be OK to have RMA0002511 and RMA0002513, but no RMA0002512? –  Jeffrey L Whitledge Dec 1 '10 at 14:39
    
That would be no problem. Actually that happens if i delete an older record. –  Tim Schmelter Dec 1 '10 at 14:45
    
Since gaps are OK, I would recommend an identity column as in @Martin's answer. –  Jeffrey L Whitledge Dec 1 '10 at 14:51
    
I think i must clarify something that i haven't mentioned. The RMA_Number is not generated on every insert. So there might be many records without a number. Martin uses the primary key to build the number. That would be a problem, because the gaps would be too big. –  Tim Schmelter Dec 1 '10 at 15:01
    
@Tim Schmelter - What distinguishes between a record with an RMA_Number and a record without? Are any other values inserted at that time? Wouldn't it be better to put all of those things into a separate table with a foreign key to the RMA table? It could be that proper normalization of your data will solve this problem. –  Jeffrey L Whitledge Dec 1 '10 at 15:20

2 Answers 2

up vote 7 down vote accepted

The fastest and safest (for concurrency) way would be to not store the RMA000... prefix at all.

Just create an integer identity column and add the prefix on via a computed column.

create table #RMA
(
id int identity(2511,1) primary key,
RMA_Number as 'RMA' + RIGHT('000000' + CAST(id as varchar(7)),7)
)

insert into #RMA
default values

select * from #RMA

Or following the new info that not all records have an RMA_Number you could use this approach for a non blocking, efficient, and concurrency safe solution.

CREATE TABLE dbo.Sequence(
 val int IDENTITY (2511, 2) /*Seed this at 1 + whatever your current max value is*/
 )

GO

/*Call this procedure to get allocated the next sequence number to use*/     
CREATE PROC dbo.GetSequence
@val AS int OUTPUT
AS
BEGIN TRAN
    SAVE TRAN S1
    INSERT INTO dbo.Sequence DEFAULT VALUES
    SET @val=SCOPE_IDENTITY()
    ROLLBACK TRAN S1 /*Rolls back just as far as the save point to prevent the 
                       sequence table filling up. The id allocated won't be reused*/
COMMIT TRAN
share|improve this answer
    
Why would this be faster? Are INTs faster than strings? Are smaller data fields faster than larger ones? Even if it's indexed properly? –  Brad Dec 1 '10 at 14:39
2  
@Brad. Yes int comparisons are faster than strings. If it's indexed then this cost might be paid at insert time rather than look up time though (at least for the particular case of finding the max value). Using identity is also faster than a homemade concurrency safe solution is likely to be as it is a non blocking solution. –  Martin Smith Dec 1 '10 at 14:46
    
@Martin, thanks for the clarification. I like the IDENTITY solution. When we developed ours we had to (why? I don't know) use an alpha-numeric ID. –  Brad Dec 1 '10 at 14:49
    
@Martin: I think i must clarify something that i haven't mentioned. The RMA_Number is not generated on every insert. So there might be many records without a number. You use the primary key to build the number. That would be a problem, because the gaps would be too big. –  Tim Schmelter Dec 1 '10 at 15:02
    
@Tim - See my edit. –  Martin Smith Dec 1 '10 at 15:15

First off, you're looking at a serious race-condition.

When we needed this on a project we worked with, we had a separate table with the current value stored in it and a function to generate the next one. We implemented locking to keep multiple calls to get the next number. As I recall, this was because we had to use alpha-numeric identity numbers (the function took care of the complex incrementing of that).

However, I like @Martin's solution best: use and IDENTITY field. You can either drop the prefix, as he suggests, or you can simply drop it from the column and append it back on when SELECTing from the table.

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I think this would be an overkill, but i was aware of the risk. I chose to create a unique constraint on this column and catch that exception in the application. If it is caught, i will start a new try to generate a unique number in a loop (max 10 tries). Thank you anyway. –  Tim Schmelter Dec 1 '10 at 14:43
    
@Tim, yes, it depends on the concurrency of your system. We were developing a POS system with 100+ terminals capable of simultaneous transactions. –  Brad Dec 1 '10 at 14:47
    
Only a few people(maximum of ~10) will use the application simultaneously, so i think that the risk of always(10 times) getting the wrong highest number is low. –  Tim Schmelter Dec 1 '10 at 14:50
1  
Catch/Retry is the wrong way to do it and it'll come back and bite you (or the poor sod who inherits the code) very nastily. Martin's way is right. Make the effort to do it and someone will be grateful later. –  smirkingman Dec 1 '10 at 15:07
1  
@Tim: The first time a user sees this they are going to think something horrible went wrong and start all over wasting company time and they are probably going to talk to their boss using it as an excuse to slack off. Eventually your boss will ask WTF and tell you to fix it. Writing wrong code at the outset is a bad idea no matter the risk. never mind that it sets you up to look bad. –  Chris Lively Dec 1 '10 at 15:22

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