Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

How to put the height of a div that contains other with absolute position?

<html>
<head>
<style type="text/css">
.a{

}
.b{
position:relative;
}
.c{
position:absolute;
}
</style>
</head>

<body>

<div class="a">
<div class="b">
<div class="c">
   ESTO ES LO QUE CONTIENE EL DIV<br/>
   ESTO ES LO QUE CONTIENE EL DIV<br/>
   ESTO ES LO QUE CONTIENE EL DIV<br/>
   ESTO ES LO QUE CONTIENE EL DIV<br/>
</div>
</div>
</div>


</body>

</html>

The height of the div class "a" is zero

share|improve this question
    
Why does c need to be positioned absolutely? If you change its position (i.e. modify its top and left styles), are you expecting a and b to change in size and/or position? –  Emmett Dec 1 '10 at 15:17

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

An absolutely positioned element does not take up any space in the layout, meaning that <div class='a'> won't expand to wrap it.

The only way you could possibly do this is to measure the height of .c via javascript and then set height of .a explicitly -- the downside, of course, is requiring javascript to do so.

Depending on where you are trying to position .c you may want to consider using a float instead, which CAN be wrapped.

share|improve this answer
    
Sounds like floating elements is what he needs indeed. Using JS is going to be big headache... –  Shadow Wizard Dec 1 '10 at 15:23

it will not matter if you give DIV B a height smaller than DIV C , because DIV C can over lap its container.

sorry if I didn't get the question right

share|improve this answer

A <div> or any other block-container will automatically grow vertically according to the content, but once you position:absolute any <div>, you are removing it from its parent content and no longer makes its parent expands.

You might want to try to float the <div class="c"> instead of absolutely position it. That way the div will continue to be part of its parent content, though you would have to set the <div class="a"> to overflow:auto in order to make it expand on floated elements.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.