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is it possible to save (to a png) an individual subplot in a matplotlib figure? Lets say I have

import pylab as p
ax1 = subplot(121)
ax2 = subplot(122)
ax.plot([1,2,3],[4,5,6])
ax.plot([3,4,5],[7,8,9])

Is it possible to save each of the two subplots to different files or at least copy them separately to a new figure to save them?

I am using version 1.0.0 of matplotlib on RHEL 5.

Thanks,

Robert

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up vote 31 down vote accepted

While @Eli is quite correct that there usually isn't much of a need to do it, it is possible. savefig takes a bbox_inches argument that can be used to selectively save only a portion of a figure to an image.

Here's a quick example:

import matplotlib.pyplot as plt
import matplotlib as mpl
import numpy as np

# Make an example plot with two subplots...
fig = plt.figure()
ax1 = fig.add_subplot(2,1,1)
ax1.plot(range(10), 'b-')

ax2 = fig.add_subplot(2,1,2)
ax2.plot(range(20), 'r^')

# Save the full figure...
fig.savefig('full_figure.png')

# Save just the portion _inside_ the second axis's boundaries
extent = ax2.get_window_extent().transformed(fig.dpi_scale_trans.inverted())
fig.savefig('ax2_figure.png', bbox_inches=extent)

# Pad the saved area by 10% in the x-direction and 20% in the y-direction
fig.savefig('ax2_figure_expanded.png', bbox_inches=extent.expanded(1.1, 1.2))

The full figure: Full Example Figure


Area inside the second subplot: Inside second subplot


Area around the second subplot padded by 10% in the x-direction and 20% in the y-direction: Full second subplot

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3  
+1: Wow! I wish I had come across these methods while trying to learn more about Matplotlib! It would be great if the official documentation directed interested readers to these useful corners of Matplotlib, and if the presentation of the relevant concepts were more structured. :) – EOL Dec 1 '10 at 21:54
    
Thanks a lot, that is what I was looking for! – Robert Franke Dec 1 '10 at 23:00
    
A day you don't learn something new is a bad day... Well done ++ – Eli Bendersky Dec 2 '10 at 4:55

Applying the full_extent() function in an answer by @Joe 3 years later from here, you can get exactly what the OP was looking for. Alternatively, you can use Axes.get_tightbbox() which gives a little tighter bounding box

import matplotlib.pyplot as plt
import matplotlib as mpl
import numpy as np
from matplotlib.transforms import Bbox

def full_extent(ax, pad=0.0):
    """Get the full extent of an axes, including axes labels, tick labels, and
    titles."""
    # For text objects, we need to draw the figure first, otherwise the extents
    # are undefined.
    ax.figure.canvas.draw()
    items = ax.get_xticklabels() + ax.get_yticklabels() 
#    items += [ax, ax.title, ax.xaxis.label, ax.yaxis.label]
    items += [ax, ax.title]
    bbox = Bbox.union([item.get_window_extent() for item in items])

    return bbox.expanded(1.0 + pad, 1.0 + pad)

# Make an example plot with two subplots...
fig = plt.figure()
ax1 = fig.add_subplot(2,1,1)
ax1.plot(range(10), 'b-')

ax2 = fig.add_subplot(2,1,2)
ax2.plot(range(20), 'r^')

# Save the full figure...
fig.savefig('full_figure.png')

# Save just the portion _inside_ the second axis's boundaries
extent = full_extent(ax2).transformed(fig.dpi_scale_trans.inverted())
# Alternatively,
# extent = ax.get_tightbbox(fig.canvas.renderer).transformed(fig.dpi_scale_trans.inverted())
fig.savefig('ax2_figure.png', bbox_inches=extent)

I'd post a pic but I lack the reputation points

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This answer can be extended to include the text labels by adding items += [ax.get_xaxis().get_label(), ax.get_yaxis().get_label()]. They were cut off before I added that. – Erotemic Nov 17 '15 at 17:27

AFAIU, subplots and figures (the objects matplotlib allows you to save) are on different API "levels". You create a Figure, plot on it (or divide it into subplots and plot on each one), and then one of the things you can do with it is call savefig to save it.

So why do you think you need to save a subtplot? Just create a fresh figure, plot on it what you meant to plot on the subplot, and save it.

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1  
Sure, one doesn't strictly need this but I have a bunch of plots, influenced by the same parameters that I change interactively. The easiest way to check all the plots at once is to have them as subplots of a single figure – Robert Franke Dec 1 '10 at 22:54

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